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Eleanor Ring says, "Elizabeth Hollen was a sister of Mrs [more]...
 ~NW Okie regarding Okie's story from Vol. 10 Iss. 13 titled UNTITLED

The old lodge does bring back memories. I remember the loft with the eight or ten bunk beds that were full bed size so that they slept four people; the huge fireplace and denim covered couches and the tether ball court outside. Those were great days!!
 ~Terry Smith regarding Okie's story from Vol. 10 Iss. 24 titled UNTITLED


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NW Okie's Ancestry Corner

Vol 7, Iss 14 NW Okie has been addicted to her family genealogy the past couple of weeks. I finally got her away from her computer last Sunday afternoon for a Sunday stroll through the pastures east of our adobe home in SW Colorado.

It was a bit warm that day (mid-60s). I finally found a cool spot to rest and catch my breathe underneath this tree that set upon a rocky hill. Okie just meandered nearby. I kept trying to get her to turn around and head back towards the adobe, BUT... she kept prodding forward.

Finally, after my tongue is stretched out a mile, panting in the shade, she decides we need to head back. It was a race! You should see me run when I am heading in the right direction towards MY distination.

I think Okie got lost. I know for a fact that she got tangled in a barbed-wire fence when she tried to step over it. That was a hilarious laugh for this Pug. Meanwhile, I finally reached my shady distination and was stretched, laying in wait by the shade of the pickup truck back at the homeplace when Oakie finally strolled back home.

Our journey this week takes us back to Virginia (Old Augusta County) in search of family roots and history & maps of the area back then. There are also some interesting stories in the Mailbag Corner: a list of 1925 Alva High Graduating Seniors; Ashley-Short Springs (Alfalfa County, OK) book for sale, compiled by Ila Wessels of Cherokee, Oklahoma; an update on Al Updegraff of Dodge City, Kansas; a story of the Cameron Family of Virginia; an inquiry about the Battle of Alva (OK); etc... View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


NW Okie's Journey

Vol 18, Iss 45 As seen on my weather-cam in Alva, Oklahoma, it looks like our Southwest Colorado Rocky snowstorm has reached into Northwestern Oklahoma on this Saturday (12/17/2016) with a bit of snow flurries and chilly temperatures. Don't worry, Oklahomans, wait three days and a change will come.

Found on Newspapers.com

The above image of "The Original Dutch Settlers of Long Island" was found in The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, dated 21 September 1858, Tuesday, page 1, with a letter to the Editor of the Brooklyn Eagle.

Dear Sir: I take the liberty of transmitting to you, for publication in the Eagle, a list of communicants in the Protestant Reformed churches of Brooklyn Flatbush, Flatlands, and New Utrecht, from September 6, 1677 to 1685, copied from the church records of Flatbush, in the handwriting of the Rev. Casparus Van Zuuren, who, during said period, was Pastor of the church in the above named towns. The original spelling of the record has been followed as nearly as possible. This list has probably never been published, and may prove interesting to some of your readers, especially those whose ancestors are to be found in it. Its publication will ensure its preservation, (of which it is worthy,) for the benefit of those who may hereafter engage in researches in the personal history of the early settlers of this county. ~ Teunis G. Bergen, Bay Ridge, August. 1858.

This week we continue our search for Electoral College and information concerning Electors. We have found some genealogy history of our CONOVER (COUWENHOVEN) family lineage that dates back to the mid-sixteen century and Amerfoort, Holland. Also, we found some interesting information concerning the "Boomers" waiting in line for "Run for Homes" in 1893.

I'm Still With Her & Bernie!
"Buckle-up, Buttercup!"
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NW Okie's Journey

Vol 18, Iss 29 Oklahoma - Well! We headed back to Northwest Oklahoma Wednesday morning. And would you believe, our SW Colorado monsoons must have been dragged behind us. Thursday morning, 5:30am there was thunder and a little bit of rain for a while and the temps were in the mid-90s. Suppose to continue tomorrow, Friday, too.

Calling All HURT Family Descendants
A few months ago I submitted my DNA to Ancestry.com, to check out my emigrants and their European makeup. I have found a connection of very high confidence to a possible HURT family 4th cousins. I need all my HURT family connections to check their genealogy records to check if there was a HURT connection that may have given up a baby boy born 7 September 1954 for adoption, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Stan Shockley was that baby boy who was adopted. Stan is searching for his Birth family. Stan wrote me a few weeks back saying he recently joined Ancestry and took the DNA test to help him learn about his birth family history. Stan Shockley mentioned that we are connected through my Maternal ancestor, Johann Hurt.

Stan was adopted at birth (7 September 1954, OKC, OK) and has no previous knowledge of his birth parents. Stan grew up on a cotton farm near Lubbock, TX. he graduated from Texas Tech in 1977. He operated a cotton farm from 1977 to 1986. He decided to leave farming after a major hailstorm in October, 1985. He married Connie Newsom Smith on June 13, 1980. They have 3 children and 6 grandchildren. We moved to the Houston area in 1990.

Stan inquired if any of Johann's children married a Native American? If you are a Ancestry.com member, click Stan Shockley's Ancestry profile and see if you can help him find his HURT birth family. Contact Stan Shockley on his Ancestry.com profile page is you can help him locate his HURT birth family.

Thanks for any help, light that you might be able to shine on finding Stan Shockley's birth family.

Good Night! Good Luck! We are stronger together! "Love conquers Hate!"
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NW Okie's Journey

Vol 18, Iss 28 Just a reminder to all out there, "We are all descendants of emigrants, immigrants, because of our European ancestors who fled Europe to seek a better life, free of religious persecution and economic oppression."

It takes researching our genealogy and the history of our ancestors to discover who we are; where we came from; and what our European emigrants went through to get to this new world (America). The more we research our European emigrants, we get a better understanding of the history and what was going on in Europe and England. That history gives us an understanding of why America became this great country where a person, no matter their race, gender, cultural or religious beliefs could feel free of persecution.

In Oren F. Morton's book, "A History of Highland County Virginia," published by the author in 1911, he stated this about our European Forefathers: "When in 1607 there was an actual beginning of those thirteen colonies which grew into the Untied States of America, Europe had not more than a third of her present (1911) population. Even England, then the foremost nation to import grain, was until 1775 feeding her people from her own soil and building her ships from her own forests. The number of people in Europe was in itself a matter of no importance in causing emigration to America. The prime causes for the settling of America were religious intolerance and economic oppression."

It was not a pleasure trip to cross the Atlantic. Back then the voyage often consumed more than a hundred days. The speed of the sailing vessel was no greater than that of a man afoot. When the winds were very contrary, the supply of water and provisions would fail, smallpox and other forms of disease were liable to cause havoc on the crowded, untidy ships, another peril facing the emigrants was being shipwrecked or captured by pirates.

Back then, even in the British Isles, any religious sect that found itself in power proceeded to persecute other sects with a bigotry and cruelty which we of this century find it very hard to comprehend. America back then was a wilderness where men who could not agree might still get beyond elbow touch with one another.

The Pilgrims came to Massachusetts; the Baptists to Rhode Island; the Quakers to Pennsylvania; the Episcopalians to New York; and the South, and the Presbyterians to the frontier. The two colonies enjoyed religious freedom from the start, and its acceptance by the others was only a question of time. Persecution was indeed brought to America, but never took deep root and was mild here to what it long continued to be for Europe back then.

Economic Oppression
The other prime cause for the emigrants to America was economic oppression. It was the long rule of the Roman Empire that made Europe thoroughly acquainted with despotism. It was when that empire went to pieces, the lawlessness of Western Europe became intolerable. There were no other recourse for the masses of the people, but to put themselves under the protection of military chieftains. They toiled for the support of the leader and his household and to follow him in war. They were known as the serfs, fillies, and lived in virtual slavery. The chieftains became the dukes and barons of the Middle Ages, who lived in castles, wore armor in battle, and boasted to their coats of arms. They were proud and overbearing, held labor in contempt, and despised the serfs on whose land they lived. Toward the peasants there was no thought of social equality or intermarriage.

This was feudalism, which gave way to new monarchies here and there out of the wreckage of the old empire. Eventually, this nobility would loose power, only to become nothing more than landlords, to whom the peasant paid rent instead of giving compulsory service. The lot of the peasant was still hard, although he was coming into a higher consciousness of his natural rights and was more disposed to act upon them.

In Europe the area of land was a fixed quantity. The arrogant landlords were virtually reducing the amount, inclosing large tracts, so they might hunt deer and pheasants. This inclosure with the growth of population made the rents too high for comfort. Poverty was spreading, the yeoman farmer, the natural backbone of society, was being crowded to the wall.

There was a perception that those who controlled the land controlled the government and determined the structure of society. Europe would remain aristocratic until land monopolies were overthrown, and this result would come only after a long and bitter struggle. Back then, the universal tendency of rent was to leave the toiler only enough to enable him to exist. It was rent that determined wages.

That is where America came into the picture with it's seemingly boundless amount of wild land. Back then wild land meant free land, free land meant ownership, and ownership meant relief from unjust rents. Free access to land meant that direct participation in government would be generally diffused. Or would it? It further meant that the resulting society would be democratic rather than aristocratic. It was seen that a higher and more general degree of well-being was possible than where privilege was in the saddle and riding rough-shod.

It was the desire for economic freedom that lured men to America even more than the desire for religious freedom. But a degree of land monopoly and of aristocratic thought and practice was the baggage brought from Europe. It was inevitable. Humanity does not progress by leaps but by steps.

Land could not be dependable course of income unless the owner rolled up his sleeves and went to work, though. To evade this necessity, the planter imported white, indentured servants and soon afterward was purchasing negro slaves.

Economic and religious opportunities were the two arms of the magnet that drew Europeans to America and made this country great.

Does any of this relate, give you an insight into what we are going through in the 21st century?

Good Night! Good Luck! We are stronger together! "Love conquers Hate!"
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NW Okie's Journey

Vol 18, Iss 20 Alva, OK - Last week we donated our time to our (C)Kouwenhoven genealogy, especially John A. Kouwenhoven [Kouwenhoven had several different spellings of its surname. Couwenhoven, Couvenhoven and Conover. ] The (C)Kouwenhoven surname could be found with "Van" in front of it. That's another story, though. And ... John (Janse, Jan) was a common family name used throughout the Kouwenhoven ancestry. As well as the name of Gerritt, which had various spellings, also: Garrett, Gerrett).

We have come across some more information about John Kouwenhoven. Such as, Dr. John B. Kouwenhoven was president of the Yonkers Academy of Medicine and owned a home in Dorset, Vermont, just 8 miles from Pawsley where English professor John A. Kouwenhoven lived and retired. Dr. John B.'s home was constructed of two homes he saved when he relocated them from the flood zone created by the planned Quabbin Reservoir in Massachusetts. Folks were so impressed by his efforts that he became involved in relocating other houses for clients of a non-medical venture he created to facilitate the moving of the structures.

WILLIAM B. KOUWENHOVEN (January 13, 1886 - November 10, 1975)
Dorset Vermont Chamber of Commerce. And, it seems a William B. Kouwenhoven is credited with the invention of the defibrillator and development of the method of CPR. The Virtual EMS Museum -- Johns Hopkins celebrates 50 years of CPR with the story of Drs. Kouwenhoven, Jude and Kinckerbocker. A heart stops, setting in motion the entire Chain of Survival- Early 911 Access, Early CPR, Early Defibrillation, and Early Advanced Care. It all starts with the three gentlemen on the right- Dr. James Jude, Dr. William Kuowenhoven and Dr. Guy Knickerbocker.

Dr. Kouwenhoven and Dr. Knickerbocker invent the defibrillator in 1957, discover the benefit of closed chest compression with Dr. James Jude in 1958, and adding Dr. Peter Safars' work with rescue breathing, create CardioPulmonary Resuscitation in 1960.

Kouwenhoven was born in Brooklyn, New York on January 13, 1886, graduated '06 with a degree in electrical engineering from Polytechnic University, and then joined the faculty of the Johns Hopkins University School of Engineering in 1914 as a professor of electrical engineering.

The first investigations were done on rats in 1928. They found that high voltage shocks from electrodes placed on the head and one extremity would stop breathing and the heart from pumping. They also tried to massage the chests of the rats, as recommended by a German physician, Dr. Boehn, but this only resulted in paralysis of the rats from crushed cervical spines. By 1933, their work on dogs showed that an alternating electrical current applied directly to the heart could restore the heartbeat but this method required opening the dog’s chest, which was difficult and less than desirable. In the late 1940s this method of open chest heart re-starting (defibrillation) became used on human patients quite regularly because it was the only option available to save patients’ lives.

Kouwenhoven concentrated on developing a method to shock the heart without opening the chest. His research was put on hold during World War II, but by 1957, Kouwenhoven and his team had perfected the defibrillator, consisting of a small box and two insulated cables with copper electrodes. Johns Hopkins Hospital immediately began using the device as a standard treatment for cardiac arrest.

Kouwenhoven and Knickerbocker worked with cardiac surgeon, James Jude to test this life sustaining theory on many patients for over a year before announcing the results of their discovery: Chest compressions could maintain 40% of a patient’s normal circulation when their heart had stopped beating. This was combined with mouth to mouth resuscitation to become universally known as Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or CPR. They also found that they could extend the time to successful defibrillation and survival of a dog to over an hour with external massage by way of chest compressions. The first documented, successful case of their method being used on a human patient, a 35 year old woman, was in July 1959. Recalled by Jude: "She was rather an obese female who … went into cardiac arrest as a result of flurothane anesthetic. This woman had no blood pressure, no pulse, and ordinarily we would have opened up her chest. Instead, since we weren’t in the operating room, we applied external cardiac massage. Her blood pressure and pulse came back at once. We didn’t have to open her chest. They went ahead and did the operation on her, and she recovered completely."

For his remarkable contributions to cardiology, in 1969 Kouwenhoven received the first-ever honorary Doctor of Medicine from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

The Quabbin House Tour
‘Quabbin Houses’ were buildings in the Swift River Valley that were moved or razed to allow for the creation of the Quabbin Reservoir in western Massachusetts.

Charles A. Wade, a builder from Dorset, Vermont, took advantage of the interest in colonial and early-nineteenth-century American history that flourished in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries as well as the inexpensive building supply of the Swift River Valley, and offered to find authentic New England houses and move them to the locations of the buyers’ choice.

Good Night! Good Luck!
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NW Okie's Journey

Vol 18, Iss 12 Alva, OK - Genealogy is a fascination for this NW Okie in many ways while searching for family surnames and the history behind them. What has always stirred my curiosity, where exactly did the WARWICK surname come from and is the Earl of Warwick have anything to do with the surnames of some WARWICK ancestors? I don't know the answer to the latter, but I include the history of Warwick's Castle and the Earl of Warwick in this week's edition.

Warwick Surname
Recorded as Warwick, Warick, Warrick and others, this is an English surname. It is locational but from any or all of the places called Warwick. These include the county of Warwickshire, or the county town of Warwick, or a small village in Cumberland. In all cases the origination of the place name is from the sh pre 7th Century word "wering", meaning a weir, with "wic", a dairy farm. The county is first recorded as Waerincwicscir in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles of 1016, but the county town is even earlier being recorded in the Saxon Chartulary of 737 a.d. as "Waerincgwican". It was not until the recording as Warwic appears in the Domesday Book of 1086 that we have a spelling that in any way resembles the modern form. The derivation of the place in Cumberland is slightly different being from the word "waroth" meaning a shore, and "wic", a dairy farm. The earliest recording of this place name is in the register of the Priory of Wetherhal of 1132, as "Warthwic". Early recordings include Richard Warwick who married Hester Thruxton at St. Mary's Aldermary, in the city of London in 1601. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Turchil de Waruuic, He was the Sheriff of Warwickshire, and dated 1086, in the Domesday Book of Warwickshire, during the reign of King William 1st, known as "The Conqueror", 1066 - 1087. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was sometimes known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

The Courts of Europe
In The Times Dispatch, Richmond, Virginia, dated 21 January 1909, Thursday, page 6, we came across this article entitled, "The Courts of Europe," by La Marquise de Fontenoy. Having to do with the eArl of Warwick claims descent from the King-maker.

Lord Warwick's boast on the subject of his lineage in the interview which he granted to Mrs. George Augustus Sala, and which, printed in a number of American papers, commences, "Yes, I am descended from the King-maker, Earl of Warwick," will be news to most students of history and genealogy, for there are no ties of blood between the house of Greville, of which the present Lord Warwick is the chief, and the King-maker is the chief, and the King-maker portrayed by Bulwer Lyton as "the last of the barons" in the novel of that name, and the only association between them is that of title and of the ownership of Warwick Castle.

The King-maker had no son, but two daughters, one of whom, Lady Anne Neville, after marrying Edward, Prince of Wales, the murdered son of Henry VI, became the consort of Richard III, of England. The other daughter, Lady Isabel, married the Duke of Clarence, who was drowned in a butt of Malmsey wine. By this marriage there were two children, a son and a daughter. The son inherited through his mother his grandfather's earldom of Warwick, and died without issue, a parliamentary attainder of his earldom of Warwick following his death, and being, therefore, of a posthumous character. The daughter, Margaret, Countess of Salisbury, who was beheaded in the Tower, had a daughter and four sons, one of whom was Cardinal Pole, Archbishop of Canterbury. AS the eldest brother of Cardinal Pole left a number of daughters, it might have been possible that, through some matrimonial alliance of their descendants with the house of Greville, the present Earl of Warwick could have boasted of descent, ever so indirect, of the King-maker. But, had the present Earl of Warwick, or any of the other four Earls of Warwick of the house of Greville, been able to discover a descent of this kind, we should undoubtedly have heard of it long ere this, and they would have taken the customary steps to secure a repeal of the attainder, all the more as the King-maker earldom of Warwick was a peerage descendable through the female as well as the male side of the house.

Unfortunately for Lord Warwick, his own wife has in her book, entitled "Warwick Castle and its Earls," demonstrated the fallacy of his pretensions to be a descendant of the "King-maker," for the volume in question shows, among other things, how it is that her husband had no connection whatsoever, directly or indirectly, with the peer known as "the last of the barons." The book is well worthy of study, for, leaving aside the many legends which are connected with Warwick Castle, it proves the historic pile, which is the bourne of so many American pilgrimages, to have been built by the daughter of Alfred the Great, and to have belonged in turn to the houses of Newburgh, of beauchamp, of Neville, of Dudley and of Greville; the house of Rich, which for 140 years enjoyed the possession of the earldom of Warwick, having never owned Warwick Castle.

Warwick Castle belonged to the Dudleys when it was visited by Queen Elizabeth, and among its most frequent guests was Amy Robert, wife of Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, and the heroine of Sir Walter Scott's novel of "Kenilworth." The Dudley Earl of Warwick played a considerable role in the opening up of this country. It was he who furnished Sir Martin Frobisher with the means of making all those discoveries in the northern part of this hemisphere which are commemorated, among other things, by what is now Frobisher's Bay, and by the so-called Countess of Warwick Island, north of Hudson Straits. This Lord and Lady Warwick may be said to have ruined themselves in efforts to explore, develop and colonize this country, and among their fellow-sufferers were Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, and Queen Elizabeth herself.

It was another of Queen Elizabeth's favorites, namely, Fluke Greville, who obtained from her successor, King James I., a grant of the then half-ruined Warwick cAstle and dependencies, being raised to the peerage as Lord Brooke. Stabbed and killed when already on his deathbed by a servant who was angered at finding that he had not been remembered in his master's will, the barony of Brooke and Warwick Castle, with all the other estates, passed, according to a special remainder of the peerage, to his cousin, Robert Greville, as second Lord Brooke, the eighth Lord Brooke and eighth of the Greville owners of Warwick castle being raised, first to the earldom of Brooke, and fifteen years later to the earldom of Warwick, on the death without issue of the last of the Earls of Warwick of the house of Rich. This was in 1758, and the present Lord Warwick is only the fifth earl of this creation.

The house of Rich may be said to have been founded by that rascally lord chancellor who gave evidence against Sir Thomas More, and who took a personal part in the torture os Anne Askew, among its most notable members having been Penelope Rich, who was the "stella" of Sir Philip Sydney, and Charlotte, Countess of Warwick, who married Addison. The house of Greville itself was founded by a merchant of London of the name of William Greville, who owned money to Richard II.

Good Night! Good Luck!
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NW Okie's Journey

Vol 16, Iss 27 Bayfield, CO - Besides walking along the Vallecito River at the Vallecito Campground, in southwest Colorado I have been engaged with some WARWICK, ECKARD and GWIN genealogy research. We have included some of that information here in this week's OkieLegacy Weekly Ezine/Tabloid.We also have some more information on World War I, 1914 Battle of Waterloo.

Are there any Alva High Goldbugs of 64, 65 & 66 out there? If you have not already registered for our 50th alumni Alva Goldbug Reunion 64, 65, 66, you need to mark your calendars for May 23, thru May 25, 2015, Alva, Oklahoma, and check out the website link above. See also: Alva Goldbug Reunion Newsletter

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NW Okie's Corner

Vol 15, Iss 34 Bayfield, CO - [Hurt sisters: Anna, Emma, Tillie and Mary.]

Things are beginning to settled in around here while I do some catching up on medical checkups and updating of our websites. Also heard via email from a distant HURT cousin, Melissa Prohaska from Omaha, Nebraska. I have since added the below information to my Paris/Hurt genealogy at ancestry.com (Paris Pioneers-Master file. The image on the left is just one of many HURT family photos that Melissa sent me.

Melissa says, "On my mother's father's side there is a HURT connection. I have the names of John Hurt and Anna Wallman as our great great grandparents, but didn't have much else about them except a list of all of their children and spouses. Nothing about when those two would have immigrated to America. My brother-in-law gets on their computer, and Googles something and comes up with your "ParisTimes website. This is where you start out saying you began your search for HURT relatives on Memorial Day 1997 in a cemetery by Chester, Oklahoma. I am reading your article about my relatives There is a serious omission in your infer, and it's about the part that connects us."

Melissa goes on to explain, "YOu list 7 children for Joseph and Anna and start with John who was born in 1880 in Nebraska, married Clara Kachel. According to my family tree, Joseph and Anna's first child was Anna Hurt who was born in 1880. My chart shows John was born in September 1882. My chart then goes on to match your info re: Joseph, Carrie, Mathilda, Emma, Mary and Lucy. Ann Hurt was my great grandma. She married Victor Shihan Sr. in 1896. They had 3 children: Victor Jr, Anna and Helen. Victor Jr was my grandfather. They all stayed in Nebraska. I know that Anna's brothers and sisters eventually settled in Oklahoma."

Anna Wallman and Joseph Hurt Family. They had 8 children, the oldest being Anna and youngest was Lucy.

Anna Hurt married Victor Shihan, Sr. They had 3 children: victor Jr., Anna Helen. Victor Jr. married Sylvia Tichy. Sylvia was 100% Czech. Victor and Sylvia Tichy had 7 children: Betty, Alice, Dorothy, Richard, Genevieve, Robert and Helen Ruth. Betty Shihan married Marlowe Olson, and they had 3 children: Melissa, Maria and Melora.

Melissa says, "The only relatives I have listed above my line that are still alive are Richard, Genevieve and Helen Ruth. They are 80, 79 and 73, and live in Lincoln or Omaha, Nebraska."

I am still updating our website at ParisTime Pioneers, adding Grandma, Grandpa, Uncle Bob's Legacy, Gene's Legacy and Vada's Diary to that site from the okielegacy.org"> OkieLegacy website. Until we get these pages done, some pages may show up with an unorganized formatting. We do have Gene and Vada's legacy pages updated, and are still working on Uncle Bob's, Grandma and Grandpa's pages.

We heard from a new HURT cousin this last week, and got to fill in some much needed genealogical blanks in our maternal HURT family genealogy.

Thanks Goodness for Obamacare, Medicare, Social Security and AARP!

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NW Okie's Corner

Vol 15, Iss 23 Bayfield, CO - Still looking into the the December, 1941 trial of Kenneth (George) Root, who was arrested for the shooting death of Donald Lee Benson (1919-1941), at a luncheon held at the Rose Hill school, near Alva, Oklahoma. Chronicling America newspapers online only go back to the 1920's. Is there someone out there that could do a lookup in the Wichita Beacon, dated 3 December 1941 (special edition) for the shooting death of Donald Lee Benson and the trial of George (Kenneth) Root (11 December 1941?

The only information that I have found online concerning this 1941 trial of Kenneth (George) Root (17 years of age) for shooting Donald Lee Benson (22 years of age), was on a genealogy site that mentioned a date of 4 December 1941, and Kenneth Root captured in Hardtner hills after shooting Donald Lee Benson, who died from wounds. On 11 December 1941, Kenneth (George) Root was charged with murder.

Donald Lee Benson was born March, 1919; died December 3, 1941. Benson was the son of Elza Albert Benson and Anna "Maude" (Highfill) Benson. In the 1920 Census taken January 17-19, says Donald was about 10 months old, living in Whitehorse, Woods County, Oklahoma. Donald was brother of: Clifford "Harold", Luella May, Rosetta "Faye", Alice Pearl, Eva "Joan", and Marian Jean Benson (Hatcher). He was buried in the Star Cemetery, Alva, Woods County, Oklahoma, USA.

Back in Vol. 7, Iss. 3, dated 1005-01-22, of The Okie Legacy, what we do know is Kenneth Root was dating Benson's sister back in December, 1941. A dinner at the Rose Hill school was the scene when Root shot Benson. What we do know was Kenneth Root was arrested by Sheriff Ken Greer, and charges were filed against Root by County Attorney Bill Gruber. The presiding judge was J. J. Gaiser, and the defense attorney for Kenneth Root was C. H. Mauntel.

We heard from Marian (Benson) Hatcher, who left a comment, "Kenneth Root shot my brother, Donald Benson. I think he got life, but was paroled after 7 years with the stipulation he never come to Oklahoma again. I have no current info but I do have bits of items about the killing and trial." Thanks to Marian Hatcher for the latest updates on the 1941 shooting. Look for Marian's information in this week's edition of The Okie Legacy.

Gateway To Oklahoma History

There is this great site online for viewing, searching old newspaper archives through the Oklahoma Historical Society, using their Gateway to Oklahoma History.

The Gateway is an online repository of Oklahoma history that you can browse through hundreds of thousands of newspaper pages dating from the 1840's to the 1920's. It provides free access to 81,776 issues and 613,515 pages of historical newspaper content.

We found some interesting articles of interest in the 1894, Norman Transcript, Norman, Oklahoma Territory, Vol. 06, No. 12, Ed. 1, Friday, 21 December 1894. We leave you with this little poem by the local Editor, O. W. Meacham:

Who Can Answer

When the fluffy, breezy bloomers
Are the universal go,
How will the tailors press the creases
Into them. I'd like to know?

When the baby's head is nodding,
And it wants to take a nap,
How can mamma lull her darling
In a bifucated lap.

When the chickens go a-grubbing
In the garden in the spring,
How can Bridget "shoo" the creatures
With no skirt to flop and fling.
-- Exchange.

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NW Okie's Corner

Vol 15, Iss 18 Bayfield, CO - Doing some genealogy searches along the lines, connections to my paternal MCGILL family, I ran across the CRAIGHEAD family, who would probably be considered "in-laws" in connection to my MCGILLs.

My ties to the Craighead family run through William Craighead (1778-1835). William had a son, Samuel Geddes Craighead (1814-1889), who married Nancy McGill (1814-1898) (my 2nd great grand aunt). Nancy McGill was the daughter of William Nathan McGill, Jr. (1783-1832) and Nancy Anne Luttrell (1787-1860). Nancy McGill had a brother David Milton MCGILL (1808-1850) (my 2nd great grandfather), also a son of William Nathan MCGILL Jr.

That brings us to my great grandfather, William Pearson MCGILL (1835-1918), son of David Milton McGill (1808-1850) and Nancy McKelvy Pearson (1816-1908). nancy Pearson was the daughter of Jacob Pearson (1789-1844) and Jane Douglas (3rd great grandparents). Jacob Pearson was the son of Abel A. Pearson and Elizabeth Doyle (my 4th great grandparents).

My grandfather, William "Bill" Jacob MCGILL (1880-1959) we have mentioned earlier, who married Constance Estella Warwick, and had two sons: Gene M MCGILL (1914-1986) and Robert Lee McGill (1916-1954).

My MCGILLs settled in Hamilton county, Tennessee, near a community called "Soddy." In 1969 Soddy and Daisy, Tennessee were combined into Soddy-Daisy, located north of Chattanooga, Tennessee on Highway 27, in a rapidly growing area of Hamilton County. Daisy, Tennessee was the site of Poe's Tavern, where the first courts of Hamilton county were held. Hasten Poe, a veteran of the war of 1812, erected the tavern. It stood at the intersection of two heavily traveled highways and was a noted stopping place. The tavern was torn down about 1915.

Soddy, Tennessee took its name from Soddy Creek which runs through the community. Soddy is a corruption of the Cherokee word "Sauta" which is a form of Echota. Rev. Able Pearson (I believe this Able Pearson to be my 4th great grandfather) organized the Mt. Bethel Presbyterian Church there in 1 December 1828 with the help of Benjamin Wallace, that helped establish the community of Soddy, TN. Col. William Clift, a large landowner and Hamilton county's first millionaire, was a pioneer citizen of this area and built his residence there in 1825.

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Duchess of Weaselskin

Vol 14, Iss 7 Bayfield, Colorado - Let us begin by wishing you all a "Happy Valentines Day" of Love and Peace throughout this Global World! We have not totaled the inches we have received up todate, but this weekend we received another 6 inches or more of accumulation. And it is still snowing on this Monday, February 13, 2012.

We hear it started to snow in northwest Oklahoma Sunday afternoon, 13 February 2012, with a dry snow. The weathermen kept changing the expected total of snow accumulation, but they first expected around 8 inches. So . . . how much snow did you receive and is it still snowing? Did Oklahoma get any icy snow mixtures in the central or eastern part of the state?

We are expecting another cold front of snow coming through southwest Colorado later and continuing through Tuesday or Wednesday.

We have been researching more on the Native Americans, especially the Keetoowahs (Cherokee) people. Some of that research appears and is featured in this week's Issue of The OkieLegacy Ezine. We also found the following "Ten Indian Commandments" by Shanti that we have included below:
The Ten Indian Commandments (Shanti)

  1. Remain close to the Great Spirit.
  2. Show great respect for your fellow beings.
  3. Give assistance and kindness wherever needed.
  4. Be truthful and honest at all times.
  5. Do what you know to be right.
  6. Look after the well being of mind and body.
  7. Treat the earth and all that dwell there on with respect.
  8. Take full responsibility for your actions.
  9. Dedicate a share of your efforts to the greater good.
  10. Work together for the benefit of all man kind.

The Duchess of Weaselskin knows of no known Native American bloodlines in NW Okie's ancestry, but that does not mean she does not have the heart, feelings for what the Native Americans suffered in the loss of their land and extinction of their bison.

If you are searching for your Indian and Native American roots, you might check out the Native American - Indian Genealogy at Access Genealogy for more Native American Records, Rolls, Indian Tribes, etc.

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Duchess & Sadie's Domain

Vol 12, Iss 32 Bayfield, Colorado - Hope you all are keeping cool, staying out of the Oklahoma heat during the "Dog Days of Summer."

This week we are sharing a photo of a panting pug, Sadie, taken 24 July 2010, out at the Fairvalley pond, in Northwest Oklahoma. Ain't she sweet posing and panting in the Oklahoma Summer heat. Thank goodness we are back in cool Colorado.

As a matter of fact, do not forget to hop over to NW Okie's Facebook Photo Album with updates of NW Okie's Eagle Totem sculpturing. You will notice that NW Okie blocked in legs and claws on our soaring eagle. AND -- those black tiger streaks (spalding) we are told are the after effects of treating the mildew with a clorox solution.

Do not forget to check out the feature concerning Talkington's disc of PDF files with twenty-eight old Anadarko telephone books. If you are searching for ancestors that lived in the Anadarko, Oklahoma area from 1903 to 1960, you might find this a very helpful research item to add to your genealogy library.

NW Okie says it is my bedtime, so I am going to hand this over to her to finally get this published for another week. Good Night and Good Luck! View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


Oakie & Duchess' SW Corner

Vol 6, Iss 52 HAPPY NEW YEAR 2005!

Since this is the last day of December, 2004, we thought perhaps we could catch many of you tonight before, after and/or at midnight to ring in the New Year for 2005. I guess you could say that this is a No frill or "vanilla" version of the OkieLegacy in Summary.

The Pilgrim Bard (Scott Cummins) says it best in his 1926 poem about New Years Eve & New Years:

"Another year its shuttle threads
The twelve month spool we all unwind;
Fate's calendar hangs o'er our heads,
Time's scythe is mowing close behind;
Yet enter we the glad New Year,
Filled with fond hope devoid of fear"
-- by The Pilgrim Bard (Scott Cummins)

We saw where last year at this time that our OkieLegacy visitor counter clocked a total of 200,000 visitors. I believe our counter today was something like 325,000 plus.

January 2004 -- Remember Fort Reno, Oklahoma? Fort Reno - fortreno.org - a military camp in 1874 -- was established as a military post in 1875 with construction of permanent buildings began in 1876. The Fort and Darlington Agency served the Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians across the Canadian River. Together they preserved the peace and directed the orderly transition of that part of Indian Territory from reservation to individual farms and ranches. Troops from Fort Reno supervised the first Great Land Run of 1889 that opened the Unassigned lands for settlement. Buffalo Soldiers of Fort Reno (Companies of the 9th & 10th U.S. Cavalry) were made up of Six black regiments, two of cavalry and four of infantry, and were authorized by congress in 1866 and stationed at Fort Reno. The name was given by the Indians to the black regiments for the color and texture of hair between the horns of the buffalo. The Buffalo Soldiers had the reputation for effective, consistent fighting against the lawless whites, Mexicans and Indians.

Then later in mid January we experienced the Red Hat Ladies (Okie Dokies) in Alva (Oklahoma). It was their monthly group gathering for dinner at the Alva Bowl Cafe. The ladies included in this "Red Hat Club" are: Barbara Case, Liz Stanaway, Ginny Hubbert, Eleanor Ring, Rose Elmore, Verla Vogts, Viola Marquette, Betty Cushenbery, Joan Nelson, Agnes Pemberton, Doris Marcus, Phyllis Devery, Leona Corbin, Dottie Gatz, Emily Rathgeber, Jane Gaskell, Jean Rose.

Also, in January we learned of another NW Oklahoma mystery of an abandoned boy in Waynoka between 1939 or 1940. Nancy Eddy was wondering, "If anyone had ever heard any stories about a small boy being abandoned in Waynoka, Oklahoma? I now live in Topeka, Kansas and just started doing some Genealogy work. My step-father, Jack Beaman, is from Waynoka. He was adopted about 1939 or 1940. He was abandoned by his father with last name Ray when Jack was about 3-years-old. We know they came from California and stayed at an apartment in Waynoka for about 2-months. One morning little Jack Ray woke-up and his dad was gone. He never heard or saw his father again. The people who owned the apartment had the last name of Beaman which they gave to Jack at age 13 or 16 when they adopted him, thus he became Jack Ray Beaman. Maybe there might be old registers around somewhere? I know at some point Jack went into the airforce, his social security number comes from Kansas. Even his own children don't remember anything. To them that was in the past. I don't know if I told you he was a twin. He also remembered that they (he and his dad) came from California and his mother was a concert piano player. Now... how hard would it be to find a concert piano player who gave birth to twin boys." -- Nancy Eddy -- Email: neddy1115@hotmail.com

January brought us a new connection via a descendant of Harry Short. Harry had played on the Austin Senators (South Texas League) baseball team at the same time as our grandfather (Wm J. "Bill" McGill) in 1906. The great-grandson of Harry Short was Andrew Short that had contacted us. This is what Andrew had written, "My name is Andrew Short. I believe my great-grandfather, Harry Short, was a teammate of Will McGill's on the 1906 Austin Senators. I wanted to send you a note to thank you for the wonderful website you have put up - oakielegacy.org - honoring among other things your grandfather, his life, and his baseball career. In trying to do some research on my family history, I found your website and with it a great deal of history about my great-grandfather as well. I was wondering if it would be okay for me to download a copy of the 1906 team photo (backside of photo with names of players) so that I might be able to add it to the documents I am collecting about our family history? There is a story in my family that, like Will, my great-grandfather at one time was called up to play with St. Louis in the Major Leagues. Although, for which St. Louis team I'm not sure. When he told his wife, she refused to move to St. Louis, thus ending Harry's Major League baseball career. He became a player/manager in the Texas leagues instead, in addition to other careers. I have at home some newspaper clippings and stories from various Texas newspapers in the early 1900s about Harry's baseball career. I will go back and review them to see if any of them mention Will McGill as well. If they do, I would be happy to copy them and send them along to you. In addition to playing baseball in Texas, I know that my great-grandfather and other relatives also lived for awhile in Oklahoma. Again, I simply wanted to thank you for all the hard work and effort you've put into your website. In doing so, you have allowed me to reclaim a piece of my family history. Best regards." -- Andrew H. Short

February 2004 -- We thought we had found the whereabouts of the old Woods County fountain that once graced the downtown courthouse square, but it was not the three-tiered big fountain after all. It turned out to be only the Dragon Head fountain that now resides in a prominent Albuquerque, New Mexico private courtyard. We found out from one of our readers, "It (Dragonhead fountain) was a drinking fountain that stood on the walk outside the west steps of the courthouse and adjacent to the goldfish pond. The fountain, pond and dragonhead drinking fountain were located on the westside of the old Woods County courthouse square in downtown Alva, Oklahoma. We do NOT know where the towering, three-tiered fountain that once graced our courthouse park is located today? Jim Barker sent us a picture of his brother and sister (Bill & Ruby) posing on the railing of the courthouse fountain.

The 75th Anniversary of the Great Race/Run of 1893 in Oklahoma Territory brought back memories when we shared tidbits from a local newspaper printed in Alva, September, 1968, commemorating the 75th Anniversary of the "Great Race of 1893. -- okielegacy.net/75thanniversary-1968.html

Remember when one of our readers sent us a doc-file of his father's memories during WWII when he was stationed at the prisoner-of-war camp in Alva, Oklahoma from September 28, 1944 to September 17, 1945. Memories of Cpt. Miles W. Kelly's Year in Alva... "After service in North Africa and Italy during World War II, my father, Dr. Miles William Kelly, was stationed at the prisoner-of-war camp in Alva, Oklahoma from September 28, 1944 to September 17, 1945. He was one of the medical officers at the facility. For the most part, this account is based on the letters that he wrote home to my mother. At least one local history, newspaper articles, and a small amount of government documents also added much to this narrative. Before relating his story, however, a few words must be said on the history of the prison camp itself. The following paragraphs are largely a paraphrase of a section of the camp in Alva, Oklahoma: The First 100 Years, 1886-1986 (1987) by Seekers of Oklahoma Heritage Association augmented by some of the government documents mentioned above. -- Bruce - Email: brucekelly@hotmail.com -- okielegacy.org/WWIIpowcamps/Alva Year.doc

Towards the end of February we learned from a 1939 news article in the Waynoka News, dated Thursday, June 15, 1939 about the biggest privately owned man-made lake in the state that was in the Dust Bowl of area of Oklahoma's Panhandle, on the 3200 acre farm of O. W. Tucker, in Cimarron County. It's dam was 45 feet high and would hold 900 acre feet of water and would irrigate 300 acres of alfalfa (started in 1937) through ditches running from both sides of the dam. The 1939 news article mentioned that C. T. Sturdevant was extension service engineer of Oklahoma A & M College back in 1939 and was assisted by someone called "Uncle Bill" Baker (Cimarron County agent) and Tucker's two sons when they made the original survey for the lake, dam.

Remember the link to the 1930's Dust Bowl Stories with excerpts from The Dust Bowl, Men, Dirt and Depression by Paul Bonnifield. The 1930's Dust Bowl was a term born in the hard times from the people who lived in the drought-stricken region during the great depression. The term was first used in a dispatch from Robert Geiger, an AP correspondent in Guymon, and within a few short hours the term was used all over the nation. The Dust Bowl Days, also known as the Dirty Thirties, took its toll on Cimarron County. The decade was full of extremes: blizzards, tornadoes, floods, droughts, and dirt storms. Early Thirties Economy -- In 1930 and 1931, the decade opened with unparalleled prosperity and growth. NATION'S BUSINESS magazine labeled the panhandles of Oklahoma and Texas as the most prosperous region. The Panhandle was a marked contrast to the long soup lines of the Eastern United States. -- www.ptsi.net/user/museum/dustbowl.html

April 2004 -- Alva was in the process of beginning another mural (Castle on the Hill) at 5th & Oklahoma Blvd. with local artists, Jim Richey, Warren Little and Rod Dunkin. They began by outlining the design for the Castle on the Hill mural at the corner of Fifth Street and Oklahoma Boulevard.

It was in April 2004 when K101 Radio Early Morning Show, 20 April 2004, talked about the OkieLegacy and the Ann Reynolds Story mysterious fiery death in 1956. -- okielegacy.org/mystery/annreynolds/index.html

May 2004 -- The artist, Don Gray, and the Alva Mural Society finished the Charles Morton Share Mural on the Professional building in downtown Alva, OK.

July 2004, Waynoka, Oklahoma celebrated seventy-five years (July 8, 1929) when transportation history was changed for travelers from the east and west coasts when a 2-day air and rail trip was established that would take them across America in 48 hours. Charles Lindbergh was an officer in Transcontinental Air Transport (TAT). TAT was the company that developed the service and selected Waynoka as the western terminus of the eastern division. It was a place where passengers would switch between trains and planes, morning and evening -- eating breakfast, dinner at the Harvey House. It began in June and continued into July when we made our move from Oklahoma to SW Colorado. This was one of those months that found us on the move between Oklahoma andColorado. Duchess' favorite spot outside was sitting, waiting by the pickup door for hints of our next journey.

September 2004, We received 1926, 1937 and 1938 Northwestern State Teachers College yearbooks that we began transcribing shortly afterwards (beginning with the 1926 yearbook). We are still transcribing on the '38 yearbook from Northwestern's College, in Alva. Check out our Old Albums -- OkieLegacy.net -- http://community.webshots.com/album/187403166kaVbcy

We did finish scanning the 1926 NSTC Ranger Album. We learned that 1926 was the first year of the Junior High School (7th, 8th, 9th grades) on the campus of Northwestern with Miss Ann K. Wilke as Director & Principal. The large room on the second floor of the Science Hall was formerly occupied by the library and had been assigned as a study hall for this department. October 2004 -- We started transcribing the 1937-38 Student Directory of Northwestern State Teachers' College and found our mother's name, address where she was living in '37 & '38 while going to College. We also recognize lots of other names listed in the student directory. We had started transcribing the 1937 Ranger album. By mid-October we were still transcribing the 1937 Ranger annual. -- okielegacy.net/NSTCRanger1937/index.html -- okielegacy.org/DOC files/StudentDirectory37-38.doc

We finished the transcribing of the 1937 Ranger yearbook, learning that the Northwestern Alumni Association was established in the spring of 1934? A banquet was held at the Presbyterian Church to organize an alumni organization to include the alumni back to 1921. In the spring of 1935 the alumni association enlarged the group to include the classes receiving degrees, diplomas each year from 1900 to 1937. In 1936 the alumni held its annual banquet in the Bell Hotel dining room, and included all the graduating classes from 1900 to the present day in the mid-1930s. They held their alumni banquets each spring and sponsored the biggest event of the year for Alva and Northwestern -- the annual Homecoming event.

Remember When Thelma DeGeer Lippincott celebrated her 100th year in June, 2004 and past away Oct. 28, 2004 as her family and friends gave celebration to her 100+ years.

November 2004 -- The latter part of November we were trying to find the descendants/families of the 1930s NSTC Students so we could return the original photos taken at Ellis Studio in Alva and Saunders Studio in Woodward, in NW Oklahoma during the 1930s. Most of them have a firstname signed on the photo while others might have a first and lastname. BUT there are two photos that had NO names on them - unknown male and unknown female. We hope someone out there can help us locate their descendants. We did find a couple of homes for a few of the photos. -- www.okielegacy.net/slideshow.htm

December 2004 -- We did have some success in finding a home for the Roberta Edwards and Reo McVicker 1930s photos with descendants of the Edwards and McVicker families.

Also, in December we found out that the 1st graduating class of Northwestern High School (NWHS) was 1937? It was located in the NEW Horace Mann building on Northwestern's College Campus. We found this little tidbit in the 1937 Ranger Album when she was reading about the Training School they had on the Northwestern State Teachers' College campus to train future teachers. You can read more about the Demonstration School & Class History of NWHS over at our NW OkieLegacy website - 1937 Ranger Album.

We didn't get started transcribing the 1938 Ranger yearbook until around mid-December. We also put the 1926, 1937 & 1938 Ranger yearbooks into a pdf file for your Christmas present to share with you all. You can now view them over at pbpartnersllc.org by clicking on the "Old Albums" link. We are still in the process of scanning the 1938 Ranger yearbook. -- pbpartnersllc.org/OldAlbums.html -- pbpartnersllc.org/pdf-files/Ranger-1926.pdf -- pbpartnersllc.org/pdf-files/Ranger-1937.pdf -- pbpartnersllc.org/pdf-files/Ranger-1938.pdf

Duchess and The OkieLegacy family would like to wish you all a Happy, Healthy and Prosperous New Year 2005. We thank you for sharing your Okie Legacies throughout the past year and hope to hear from you in 2005. See you next weekend and next year with our regular HTML format. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


Duchess' SW Corner.

Vol 6, Iss 51

'Twas the day after Christmas and all through the land...

These are the Answers to Knowledge Quiz from a couple of weeks ago. We met to put them in last weeks newsletter, but got a bit sidetrack and drawn back to 1938.

Oakie took the test and got 15 out of 27. How did you do? Oakie messed up on the Canadian coins -- missed one of the colors on the Campbell soup can -- missed #9 by one number (she said 87 instead of 88)... just to name a few. Here's the long awaited Answers:

1. Bottom;
2. 50;
3. Right;
4. Blue, red, white, yellow, black, & gold;
5. 1, 0;
6. Right;
7. 20;
8. Red;
9. 88;
10. Counter (north of the equator);
11. Towards bottom right;
12. 12 (no #1);
13. Left;
14. Clockwise as you look at it;
15. The Bluenose;
16. 8;
17. Left;
18. 5;
19. 6;
20. Bashful;
21. 8;
22. Ace of spades;
23. Left;
24. Loon;
25. * (asterick), # (pound sign);
26. 3;
27. Counter.

The Final Word for 2004, We want to take a moment to thank all of you for your time, attention, and loyalty during this past year and to wish you the best for the coming year. You and Your Okie Legacies are the reasons we are here, to share, preserve a little piece of the past. Help those genealogy enthusiasts that are searching through a needle in a haystack for the next piece of the puzzle and to connect one generation to the next. We love hearing, sharing your legacies and bit & pieces every week and hope to continue more of the same into 2005 and beyond.

Merry Christmas - Seasons Greetings - Happy New Year 2005! See Y'all next year with more Okie Legacies! ~~ Linda "oaKie" & Duchess ~~ View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


Duchess & Oakie's NW Corner

Vol 6, Iss 36 Bayfield, Colorado -

This is the REAL OkieLegacy Vol. VI, Iss. 36! And it "ain't" blank this week! Some of you jokingly wrote in about the "blank Iss. 36.". That was just a mere preview of things to come -- giving you the choice of what might be this week. That is our story and we are sticking to it.

Maybe Duchess wrote! Maybe she did NOT! Neither of us will ever tell! (LOL) Actually, we keyed the wrong issue file number into our mailing program when sending out last week's OkieLegacy. BUT like another newsperson wrote me, "So you write yours a week ahead of time?  Boy, I will never be able to catch up with you!"

September is here! Frances is battling the Floridians and east coast! thundershowers showed up today in SW Colorado mountains! AND the moon rising over the mountains up this way has been spectacular!

Paris Reunion 2004 -- We received our annual notice of the Paris' Family 69th Reunion this week. We just want to remind all those Paris' out there that the 69th Annual Paris Reunion at the Chester Community Bldg, in Chester, Oklahoma, Sunday, September 12, 2004. Y'all know where Chester is, don't you? It's west of Fairview -- North of Seiling -- South of Waynoka -- SE of Woodward. SEE MAP -- We don't know that we will be able to make it this year to the 69th Paris Reunion, 'cause we are still in Colorado. If you go, take and send me some pictures of the Paris' that made it this year. Thanks!

Ingersoll, OK - Old Gas/Grocery station, north side of nwy 64Recently we have been asked, "Does anyone remember the names of the old couple that ran the old gas station on the north side of the highway in Ingersoll, Oklahoma?" 

We sent out some inquiries to a few readers and found this answer as to the owners..."Raymond and Nettie Mantz." I am told that Glenn & Pauline Tucker owned "Tucker Supply" just down highway 64 just west of Mantz's and they were Tony Fox's grandparents.  . I hear that the gas/grocery store was "a hole in the wall" type operation where good friends met every weekend or so for a soda & visit. If you have any stories to share about Ingersoll and the gas/grocery station on the north side of highway 64, in Ingersoll, Oklahoma, we would love to hear from you and share your old photos, stories with everyone in the "OkieLegacy."

1904-07 El Reno Photography -- Is there anyone out there that might have some information concerning a photography company that was in El Reno, Oklahoma around 1904-07?

I did a search online for "1904 El Reno Oklahoma Photographers" and came up with the following web site - J. A. Shuck Photography from 1904 until his death in 1952. Can you help us and our Charlotte in the Mailbag Corner below?

I heard from someone this last week that wanted to know more about the "OkieLegacy." For those new to the group, Our Free online e-zine/newsletter goes out every Friday evening (sometimes early evening & sometimes after midnight, but just in time to greet you Saturday morning if that is when you check your email. It began with Oakie's Heart To Heart and evolved into The Okie Legacy. We love hearing from you all and sharing your inquiries / photos / family legacies. We are working on our sixth year sharing Okie Legacies with our readers - okielegacy.org, Vol6. We started it back in the Spring of 1998 (or was it 1999) as an uplifting weekly newsletter. It has gradually grown into a networking vehicle to preserve our Oklahoma history -- networking with other former, present Oklahomans (Okies) -- sharing and preserving our Okie Legacies, genealogy.

As we said it is a free weekly newsletter with a collection of Okie past & present histories gathered from people across the world.  This writer (Oakie & her side-kick Duchess) were born and raised around NW Oklahoma, Woods County, Alva.  You can read more About Us at okielegacy.org/aboutus.html

With the RNC winding down in NYC this Thursday, that ends another party convention to try and sway voters. NOW it is back to hurricane watch along the eastern coast of Florida. We believe they have climbed to "F" in the alphabet as hurricane "Frances" mounts it's attack on the Florida coast! You Floridians out there, hope you are battaning down your hatches and making tracks to higher ground. This too shall pass and things will start looking up soon.

Duchess' Pet Peeves...

I suppose we all have pet peeves that drive us bonkers at times, huh? One of this Pug's Pet Peeves is the scare, smear tactics of personal destruction -- negative ads that are making the rounds the last few months. As for this Pug, Oakie and I just ignore them and pay them NO mind. Because we know they are NOT reliable and are only out there to smear, degrade a candidate's reputation. I wonder what would happen IF we ALL boycotted those candidates who use scare, smear tactics, negative ads. Would that help send a message that they do NOT work -- getting things back to the issues that really count?

We hope you are NOT one of those voters that relies on scare, smear tactics and negative ads to tell you how to VOTE!

Here's to making America Stronger at Home! Respected in the World! Believe In America! We can do better!

See Y'all next weekend with more Okie Legacies! ~~ Linda "oaKie" & Duchess ~~

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NW Okie's Corner

Vol 11, Iss 38 The photo to the left is a picture of two football players with the following info on the backside: "Pillow Top, manufactured by The Harry M. Muller Co., Mfgs of Photo Pillow Tops, 411-413 Montrose Ave., Chicago, Ill." It also states, "Stick on back of photo, Size - 18x18; color - blue; copies - 1; Agents Name - Phillips; ship by mail; town & state - San Francisco, Cal.; remarks - Zenobia satin. The football has "Pug Ugly Twins" written on it. Is the writing on the backside of photo, at the bottom "(either 104 or P04) Kanis 148 CO?" What is the symbol on the shirt of the player on the left?

I do not know the year the photo was taken and do not know the names of the two football players. Maybe ? Someone out there doing genealogy & family research has seen this photo before and can help us identify the people and the date of the photograph. Thanks!

Here it is ? The crispness of a Rocky Mountain Fall is upon us! We have had reports to expect a freeze report here in SW Colorado moving into Tuesday. That Montana cold front is moving into our area. I love the cool, crispness of the Fall! AND ? It means it is that time of year to bring in my tender houseplants and disengage my outdoor waterfall feature, huh?

Perhaps many of our readers the last couple of weeks have had a slow turn at loading the "OkieLegacy eZine." I am here to tell you that it "ain't" your computer. It had/has something to do with the our server and the loading of the ASP pages. We are working to see what we need to do! Thanks for the following letting us know their problems with loading the OkieLegacy eZine/Tabloid!

John says, "For so many years we here in our home in Oregon have been eager and wait for our Okie Journal. However, this time it came it came in and would not allow us to open and read it. Tech looked at my computer and found nothing wrong at this end. Please send it again so we can see if it will open."

James says, "Hi Linda, Has anyone reported NOT being able to load the OkieLegacy?

"I click on either link and get the message, "Loading ? message with the spinning wheel." However, nothing happens with either link, tabloid or ezine. I am using a Mac PowerBook G4 and Mail/Safari. Just a question to see if it is me or is a bigger problem."

Have a cool, crisp Fall break in your neck of the woods!
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Happy 1st B-Day, Sadie Sadie...

Vol 8, Iss 16 Our Sweet, Snoozing Sadie Sadie, (pictured here) will be celebrating her first birthday, April 25, 2006, Tuesday. She is almost as smart as Duchess, but has a way to go ... yet!

For those of you we have not explained to so far, the reason for the second copy of last week's "The OkieLegacy Ezine" arriving in your "Inbox", Tuesday morning (4/18/2006) is because we were testing our database mailing list with our hosting server to see if we had the solution to our problem worked out. Yep! We think we are on the cyber-road again!

After finding the solutions to keep our hosting server from marking it as 'SPAM', we are back in business again. NOW ... our hosting server tells us our emails have a rating of 0.1 on the spam scale. If emails fall over a 5.0 rating, then it gets shoved to the 'SPAM' folder and not sent. WHEW! BUT... This is probably more than you ever wanted to know, huh?

NOW!... We are venturing onto another challenge & adventure for this NW Okie! LOL... That's just what this "Old" Lady needs! We have been setting up two NEW databases to make their appearance in the near future ("OkieLegacy Genealogy" and "OkieLegacy US History Collections").

We are still in the process of working out the bugs before we finally enter data and clean, organize data on our OkieLegacy website. How do you feel and what are your suggestions as to a more interactive, searchable database driven website? That is our plan for now, anyway. We will let you know when the debute shall take place.

Gas Prices Rising Again...
We heard this Saturday morning that Oklahoma gas prices went up another 2 cents this morning. Our Perry, Oklahoma informant says, "Independent stations went back to $2.779 while the branded one's went to $2.799 headed toward that 'magic' $3 they're predicting. I have a sinking feeling that we are seeing our lowest prices right now and that as vacation-time travel gets into full swing -- prices will soar higher again. We may yet see $4 or $5 per gallon."

Some have been stating, "Since it's 'the good old summertime,' I think I might have to get my motor-scooter running again. Perhaps I may even put some bicycles back together and see how much I can sell some of them for. I probably have 20 or more just gathering dust in my storage area. Those things don't even need the hay or oats that your horse would consume (and there's no 'exhaust' to be concerned about)."

Durango, Colorado's gas prices Friday were between $2.929 thru $3.029 for regular. BUT... Premium Plus was another 20-cents higher. Saturday in Bayfield, Colorado gas prices are surging ahead of Oklahoma's gas prices to over the $3.00 range. Bayfield's Conoco station had regular Gas at $3.029 and Premium Plus at $3.229.

For a second vehicle, we may have to retreat back to the horse and buggy days ... you know, the surrey with the fringe on top buggy. BUT... the hay, oats and upkeep on a horse probably wouldn't save any more money. We don't drag the streets or squares like those days of our youthful years, either. We need to do more cycling and walking, though!

Speaking of horses...
Cassie (5 year mare) had her 2006 colt April 17, 2006. NO! We have seen the NEW colts ... Yet! Here is a list of our other horses -- CLICK HERE We haven't laid eyes on either of them as yet! Cassie is back in NW Oklahoma at Clarks Quarterhorse Farm, East of Alva, Oklahoma, just East of the Dacoma Blacktop road. If you are driving out by Clarks Quarterhorses any time soon, we would love for you to stop and asked Bud or Lovina if you can take a picture of "Wagner's Cassie mare & NEW colt." Anyone out there looking for a good sweet quarterhorses? See Bud or Lovina Clark, P. O. Box 803, Alva, Oklahoma 73717!
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Genius Is 1% Inspiration

Vol 7, Iss 10 They say, "Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration." We can believe that! That one percent inspiration has had Wagner's oldest son (Michael) and Oakie laboring all this week with the NEW LOOK for The Okie Legacy and it's database-driven newsletter/ezine. Perhaps things will start to settle down for awhile before "Oakie" has anymore Inspirations! We couldn't have done it without you, Michael.

FYI... It was Thomas Alva Edison (1847-1931), Inventor, whom that quote was made. The source of the quote came from Edison's autobiography, Life of Thomas Edison (1932). Thomas Edison was a tireless tinkerer who loved to boast of his prodigious capacity for labor. Once ensconced as the "Wizard of Menlo Park" and regarded as America's resident genius, he strove to live up to his reputation as "a fiend of work." It is said that he drove himself and his staff to the point of exhaustion, sometimes working around the clock to meet a deadline. At his death Edison had 1,300 U.S. and foreign patents to his credit.

Sometimes this Precious Pug thinks Oakie's inspirations creates "a fiend for work" for those around her. BUT... we do try to take breaks now and then in the Spring-like mountain sunshine that has been coming out this week. I hear our next inspiration is to reorganize all our photos that we have online into their perspective categories on the OkieLegacy Photo Gallery. With Spring just around the corner, this Precious Pug may take a much needed break.

As we said a few days ago in our Notice of NEW Interactive Look, we will be adding the "Mailbag Corner" features for viewing during the week with Duchess & Oakie's SW Corner following on Saturday. After each feature there will be a "View Comments" and "Write Comments" link. If you have any information to add or share, don't be shy -- just Click on "Write Comments" and give us a tryout. BUT... keep your comments clean, decent. We do have the power to "delete" those "unwanted" comments.

Just Remember... With everyone's cooperation, consideration, understanding and decency, together we can do almost anything. We can share, preserve our knowledge, thoughts, history, genealogy -- connect with those thousands of miles away and around the World.

We would like to see this "Newsletter/Ezine" become an Interactive Forum that you can use to Connect -- Share your Genealogy, Legacies, Memories, Old Photos, & Knowledge of growing up in Oklahoma and other surround states. We also realize that some of you were born and raised in Oklahoma, but for some reason have moved with your families to other parts of the World -- with a longing to connect once again with memories of your past -- searching for your geneaology roots.

We appreciate those of you that have already replied, "I too would like to show my appreciation for the new format. There have been many times when I wanted to make a comment, now I can. Maybe too often." View/Write Comments (count 5)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


Looking Back - OkieLegacy Issues of 2007

Vol 9, Iss 52 We began January 2007 by switching from a PC to a Mac computer. AND... we are glad we did. If I ever buy another computer it will NOT be a PC! It will be a Mac!

AND... everyone knows that with the new Mac Operating System Leopard with built in Bootcamp, you can partition your Mac hard drive and install Microsoft Windows on one side of the hard drive and run Mac OS Leopard on the other with the intel core duo chip. I hear tell that Windows runs faster & better on a Mac computer. This ain't a paid advertisement! Just a former PC -- NOW a Mac Lover's observations!

The first week of January, 2007, Clayton, NM was getting drifting, flurries of snow that created one lane of traffic that continued up towards Walsenberg and northward towards Denver, Colorado.

Snow and ice reached as far as Pauls Valley, Oklahoma the second week of January 2007 and things were getting underway to celebrate Oklahoma's Centennial for their 1907 statehood, November 16, 2007, across Oklahoma.

Gasoline prices in Oklahoma during January were at $1.899 per gallon of regular unleaded gas.

We learned that there is a gentleman in Wales, United Kingdom, doing research on Oklahoma soldiers that might have fought in WWI for the British & Canadian forces. Mr. J. S. Clark was searching for information on J. H. Mondy, Pvt. and others who were in the Canadian army. With the help of our OkieLegacy readers, we found some relatives of Mondy's that are living in the Perry, Oklahoma area.

We learned that NWOSU's Lincoln Bust sculptor and creator was created in 1914 by Frank Ingels and he donated it during the Spring commencement of 1915 graduating class when his brother Roland Ingels graduated.

In Vol. 9, Iss. 5 of The OkieLegacy we learned a bit more about Woods county, Oklahoma Terriotry newspaper legacies with the information we retrieved from the Oklahoma Historical Society in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. There was also a list of Oklahoma WWI Soldiers that served and died in the British & Canadian forces 1914-1918.

In Vol. 9, Iss. 6 of The OkieLegacy we learned that the Old Miller Hotel in Waynoka, Oklahoma was owned by Wm. E. Miller and his wife, Cordelia, who came to Waynoka in the Run of '93. The Millers built the hotel on the north end of their property near the Santa Fe rail yards, expecting the town to build near there. However, the town was built nearer the train station, south of the rail yards about a half mile.

That was just the first few weeks of January, 2007. You can visit our Journal Archives & Volume 9 Archives for a more detailed look back at The Okielegacy Issues of 2007.

For those of you just now getting onboard with The OkieLegacy, a BIG Welcome is extended your way.

We have enjoyed hearing from many of you -- sharing your stories -- learning your legacies throughout the last nine years. We hope to see you next year, 2008, and share more family legacies, genealogy and stories with you. In 2008 we will be changing our weekend publishing of our FREE weekly OkieLegacy Ezine from Saturday to Sunday.
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An Answer For A Nephew

Vol 8, Iss 49 We received a surprise email from a nephew this week. He was inquiring about a MCGILL family tree. His mother (our baby sister, Amber) seems to think that Gene McGill paid a professional to draw-up a MCGILL Family Tree.

If he did, a lot of those alleged records were pirated, locked away from some of us during our parents probate estates. BUT... that's another story for another day. Most of you living in northwest Oklahoma have probably heard of the "McGill Probates from Hell"... haven't you?! Maybe someday we will expand a bit more, but not now.

We have no information about Gene having a family tree chart prepared, but we believe he did send off for a McGill coat of arms. AND... we do know that our Grandmother, Constance Estella Warwick McGill, did sufficient research to qualify as a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) around April 1, 1925, using her ancestor Captain David Gwin.

Awhile back when we were just beginning our family search, genealogy webpages, we scanned several coats of arms for our HULL, GWIN, WARWICK, McGILL families and placed them on our family website over at ParisTimes Genealogy.

There have been questions about Gene McGill and his involvement with the Masons & Shriners. We do know that Gene was a "32d degree Mason" and a member of the "India Shrine" in Oklahoma City, but that's all we know about his involvement with the Masons & Shriners. Perhaps the "India Shrine in Oklahoma City" would be the place for our nephew who is doing his own research to obtain more information about his grandfather's involvement with the Masons & Shriners.

Maybe someone out there could, would have more information than we have and could point him in the right direction.
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Edwards County, Kansas - Wayne Cemetery

Vol 8, Iss 44 We made it to Lewis, Kansas and found the Wayne Cemetery east of Lewis and went looking, walking through in search of the McGills buried there. We took some pictures of three grave markers for some McGill's we found: Benjamin & Harriet N. McGill (parents of Frank McGill) and Wilburita McGill, sibling of Frank McGill. Wilburita died in infancy.

When we were walking through the Wayne cemetery east of Lewis, Kansas looking for McGill's we noticed some TALLMAN surnames. We didn't figure them into our genealogy until we got to Alva and started looking through our family tree database. Our WARWICK side of the family had some TALLMAN surnames listed that married into the WARWICK's through Elizabeth WARWICK (Benjamin Tallman descendants. We are going to have to go back to Lewis, Kansas, Wayne cemetery and get some pictures of the TALLMAN surnames buried there to see if any of them match up.
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Paris, Hurt & Louthan Info

Vol 10, Iss 46 Since my ParisTimes Genealogy database had very few LOUTHAN family data, I did some genealogy research on how my PARIS, HURT and LOUTHAN's were possibly related.

Through my Ancestry.com account I found lots of LOUTHAN connections and information on Gilbert Shirley LOUTHAN.

It looks like John Cope LOUTHAN was the grandfather of Gilbert Shirley LOUTHAN through John's 2nd wife Mary Ann HALE.

Florence T. (LOUTHAN) PARIS' father was Robert Hiram & Belle Claircy (COKERHAM) LOUTHAN.

My Grandmother, Mary Barbara (HURT) PARIS had a sister Emma Jennie HURT who married Samuel Oscar LOUTHAN.

Mary Barbara (HURT) PARIS had a son, Leslie Martin PARIS that married Florence T. Louthan.

Anyway... Samuel Oscar and Robert Hiram Louthan were brothers through John Cope LOUTHAN's 1st wife, Jane HADDOW.

Samuel Oscar Louthan

As for Samuel Oscar Louthan, he was born 20 Aug. 1872, in Missouri and died 21 Dec. 1951, in Chester, Major, OK, and married Emma Jennie Hurt, born 28 Nov. 1890, Omaha, NE and died Sep. 1974, Chester, OK. Emma Hurt was a daughter of Joseph & Anna (Wallman) Hurt.

Anna Wallman, born 1869 in Czecoslovakia, died 1906 in Orion, Major County, OK.

Joseph and Anna (Wallman) Hurt had the following children: Emma Jennie (b. 28 Nov. 1890, NE), Edward "Joe" (b. 1884, NE), Carrie (b. 9 Apr. 1886, NE), Christine Tillie (b. 1889, NE), Mary Barbara (b. 6 Sep. 1893, NE), Eddie J. (b. 1894, NE), Anna (b. 1895, NE), Lucille Marie (b. 28 May 1899, Orion, OK)

Samuel Oscar & Emma Jennie (Hurt) Louthan had the following children: Annabelle Maude, Howard Raymond, Arthur, Lester Leroy, Floy Edwin, Lucille.

So... How do your PARIS, HURT & LOUTHAN surnames match up with mine?
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The Freedom Call Goes On-Line

Vol 9, Iss 12 Do you subscribe to The Freedom Call newspaper out of Freedom, Oklahoma? Do you live out of state with a computer and internet connection? The Freedom Call will soon be available on the Web. That is according to the front page article in The Call's March 22, 2007 issue.

As I was reading this week's Issue of The Freedom Call, Volume 86, Number 12, Thursday, March 22, 2007, one of the front page headlines read, The Freedom Call Soon To Be Available on Web. Subscriptions Go On Sale Next Week. Grab next week's "Freedom Call" for more details.

According to the editor (Donna Hodgson), "The Freedom Call is upgrading to the worldwide web and will be availble on-line, ready to read the same day the paper is mailed each week. Instantly, The Call's online subscribers will be able to catch up with news of their hometown paper."

The Call article mentioned that the on-line, one year subscription fee will be $25 with a free version of the weekly product available soon. We are told to watch next week's newspaper for the dates. The article goes on to state, "One-year subscription to the on-line paper will allow subscribers to look at the past three months' newspapers as well as the most current issue."

The front page article also says, "The Call and many other newspapers throughout Oklahoma have joined in a partnership with ColorMax located in Payneville, MN, and have taken advantage of a process that makes PDF files of the newspaper text searchable. Oklahoma Press Association, a statewide newspaper group, recently introduced OPEN (Oklahoma Press Electronic News) to newspapers throughout the state in an effort to make on-line subscriptions available. Numerous newspapers are taking advantage."

If subscribers want access to issues further back than three months, they will be required to pay an additional fee. It sounds like that eventually subscribers will be able to research previous Freedom Call files all the way back to 1906. This would be great for genealogy researchers. Way to go Freedom and The Freedom Call for making yourselves available on the World Wide Web! We wish you much success now and in the future!
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About The NW Okie

Vol 10, Iss 12
This is for those of you who have just recently joined us here or want to know more about the NW Okie, editor & publisher of The OkieLegacy. Who is that lady collecting Okie Legacies? AND... Why? You can read a short "bio" about me over at my ParisTimes Genealogy site.

It was 60 years ago, 11:35a.m., Alva General Hospital, a third (3rd) daughter was born to Vada Eileen (Paris) McGill (31 years) and Gene M. McGill (33 years). Linda Kay was a Winter baby weighing in at 6lbs-10oz. Her parents arrived just in the neck of time on that February, 1948 morning, at the Alva General hospital with 1-1/2 hrs to spare before Li'l Linda's arrival. My sister Dorthy gave me my name.

My Father... Gene McGill, was a flying farmer, bearded custom harvestor in the 1940's and a Democratic State Chairman in the 1960's.

Gene McGill was born December, 1914 and died June, 1986 on Father's Day. He was the oldest son of William Jacob McGill and Constance Estella (Warwick) McGill. Gene had a younger brother, Robert "Bob" McGill, that was born August, 1916 and died February 1954. My father got his pharmacist degree from OU in 1937.

My Mother... This photo taken of my mother, Vada Eileen Paris, was her high school graduation photo taken when she was 18 years of age.

Vada Paris was born November 11, 1916 and died July, 1992. She was the fourth child and oldest daughter of Ernest Claude Paris and Mary Barbara Hurt from around Chester (Tailholt), Oklahoma, Major County. Vada had six brothers and two sisters. I think only Uncle Sammy is alive, living in Sand Point, Idaho today. Vada was a homemaker who went back to school in the early fifties to get her teaching degree in Home Economics from Northwestern State Teachers College.

My Sisters & Me... This is a 1955 photo of two of my sisters and Me, in the backyard of 703 7th Street, Alva, OK. The photo shows Linda, Dorthy, and Amber perched on a picnic table in the backyard, of 703 7th Street, Alva, Oklahoma. The oldest sister (Connie Jean) is NOT pictured -- and not quite sure why?

Sweet Li'l Linda Kay was raised one of two middle daughters of the four McGill Sisters in the Gene & Vada Paris McGill family.

My life began sixty years ago, as one of the Baby Boomers and raised as a Democrat, in a Small, Rural Community located in Woods County in the NW Corner of Oklahoma.

My Schooling began at Horace Mann Elementary in Kindergarten and progressed thru Washington Elementary, Alva Jr. High, Alva High. I hated the little snobby, elite, cliques that formed during the Jr. High and High School years. I chose not to belong to any of them. I finished my college education at Northwestern State College in 1971 with a BA Degree in Art & Sociology.

A 1969 Mid-Summer, July Wedding united David M. Wagner & Linda Kay McGill after a year courtship during our time at Northwestern State College (NSC). In the Early-Fall of 1970 our oldest Son, Michael, started our family while we were living, working, and finishing College at NSC in Alva, Oklahoma. (It was back in the mid 1960's during the days of the Viet Nam War, Peace, Love, and Hippies.. [Although, I never was a Hippie.]

In the Early-Summer (June) of 1973 David, Linda and son (Michael) were blessed with their second son, Robert. David was working for Kerr-MaGee Research & Engineering in OKC -- we were living in Edmond, OK, USA. In (or about 1975) David got a job with Exxon Engineering, Baytown, TX and the four of us became Texas-Okies for five or six years before we moved back to Alva, OK about 1980.

I love to listen to music of the "'40's" and "Rock-n-Roll Oldies" of the 50's, 60's, 70's! I also like a little of the "Classical, Jazz, Blues, Soul and Country!" One of my favorite Radio stations back in my earlier childhood was KOMA. You could find this transistor sister walking around Alva with her transistor radio tuned to KOMA radio station.
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Patronymics, Naming of Dutch Children In New Netherland

Vol 18, Iss 45 In searching through genealogy information we came across this interesting little tidbit of the naming of Dutch children in New Netherland. In the 1600s and 1700s, if you were looking for the parent of a person, the patronymic would tell you the father's given name, but not the last name being used. It was in the 1700, surnames became fairly firmly established so things got easier.

Spelling of names changed greatly as time passed. What you see in print may not be the spelling that the person used for their own named, if they could spell. The spelling that was recorded was mainly the result of the education, experiences, and language spoken by the person recording the information.

Let us begin with "Patronymics," which was a system of naming children, existed in New Netherland (later known as New York State) in the 1600s. This system was outlawed sometime after the British took control of New Netherland in 1664 and then again in 1674. Patronymics was a system of naming used before surnames were used. Each succeeding generation had a new 'surname,' so to speak.

Have you ever run into to following in searching your Dutch ancestors? If a man named Jacob had a son Hendrick who had a son Samuel who had a son Dirck, the full names of these men were based not he names of their fathers. We might not know the full name of Jacob, but the rest we can know. They were Hendrick Jacobse, Samuel Hendricks and Dirck Samuelse. The ending of the name could vary in the written record. Sometimes Jacobse appeared as Jacobsen or Jacobsz. Daughters took the name of their father also, but supposedly with a different ending (dr), but mostly with the same endings that the sons had.

This patronymic naming system worked fine in rural areas in Europe. There was probably only one "Samuel, son of Hendrick" in a surrounding area of farms. But this system presented problems in the cities, where it became very confusing just who you meant. There were too many people with exactly the same name. Cities in some western European countries required surnames, while at the same time patronymics were allowed to flourish in the countryside.

When the European immigrants from various countries arrived in New Netherland in the 1600s, there was a mix of naming systems. Some immigrants already had a surname, but a great number did not. As the population grew, as a practical matter surnames would have eventually been needed by everyone. The British just speeded up the process by requiring them.

Surnames
As to surnames, when people were required to take a surname, they had to invent it. Many of them decided that they were from a certain European village so they would call themselves something like 'from Beuren.' The Dutch word for 'from' is 'Van.' And so now we know the origin of the name 'Van Buren' (from Beuren). Other people might decide that they were from the mountains or from a wooded region, and create a surname from those Dutch terms.

A child born aboard ship in a storm got the name of 'Storm Bradt.' later he was known as 'Storm Van der Zee,' giving rise to that surname. Van der Zee means "from the sea.' There were a lot of Dutch names beginning with Van, as you know. Denmark didn't require surnames until about 1850-1860.

Naming of Dutch Children In New Netherland
Dutch parents in New Netherland/New York generally named their first two sons and first two daughters after their own parents (the grandparents of the children). If on of those children died, very often the next child born of that sex was given the same name. The idea was that the fathers and mothers of the married couple needed to be honored. If two children had the same name in a Dutch family, it was almost always true that the first one died (Germans, on the other hand, not uncommonly had more than one child by the same name in a family).

There was a tendency for the first Dutch son to be named after its paternal grandfather and the first daughter after its maternal grandmother, but there was no reliable consistency in the pattern of which grandparent got honored first. Sometimes, using baptism records we can assemble an entire family unit, but we have no idea who the parents of the married couple were. To help find those parents, look at the names of the first two sons in the family (for example 'Cornelius' and 'Garrett' were sons of Albert), and then look in the index of the records of the same church (or each church, if the children were baptized in more than one church). If a Cornelius or Garrett was listed, check all baptisms for the man. If one of the baptisms is for an Albert, there was a good chance that you have found the father of the Albert that interests you. If the mother of Albert in the baptism has the same name as one of Albert's first two daughters, there is much less doubt that you have the right baptism record for Albert. If the records from that church don't help, expand you search to nearby churches, primarily of the same religion. Using the names of the children in this manner was one of the best methods of finding the parents of a person i the early days of the state.

And if you get stuck and cannot find the parents of this Albert, look for the parents of his wife instead. If you can find them, and if their names match two of the children of Albert, then you know the family is using the Dutch pattern of naming. That makes it highly likely that two other children will have the names of Albert's parents. But, if the wife's parents' names were not among the children, either you don't have all of the children, or they were not using the naming pattern. If the latter was true, determining the parents of Albert would not be easy. Although in some Dutch lines this pattern of naming children may not have been used.
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NW Okie's Corner

Vol 14, Iss 53 Bayfield, Colorado - On this last day of 2012 December 31st, here in Southwest Colorado, we are experiencing a fresh coat of snow that seems to be getting heavier and heavier as the day progresses. You can barely see the mountain tops across the way here at the north end of the Vallecito Reservoir, North of Bayfield, Colorado. When we have our UStream - Okielegacy up and broadcasting, you can view a piece of Southwest Colorado weather.

We always love hearing how our website has helped others searching for their genealogy legacies. We heard from Desiree Kirby Rahman, who stumbled onto our Prairie Pioneer News website, when she was looking for some information on Alva's "Castle on the Hill." Her interest in Alva and northwest Oklahoma extends several generation.

Desiree's great grandmother, Olive Ruth Littlefield Whitehead, attended when NWOSU was a Normal School. Her family legend says she was in the first class. Desiree's grandmother, Sarah Ann Whitehead Ackley, attended the Teachers' College and later graduated from the State College along with Desiree's father, Robert Kirby, in 1959. Her mother Ruth Ann Ackley Kirby graduated in 1966 or 1967 and later got a Master's degree from the State University.

Another interesting tidbit I found while reading through Oren F. Morton's, "History of Rockbridge County, Virginia," the mention that a William Warwick, who had married Elizabeth Dunlap, had four children (Jean, Martha, John and Jacob). Jean and Martha were killed by the Indians about 1759. John settled in Kentucky in 1784. Jacob was an extensive owner of realty and livestock in Pocahontas. The widow of William Warwick married Andrew Sitlington of Bath.

I was glancing, searching through the old newspaper at Chronicling America, and found an interesting little news tidbit that I have never heard before about my grandpa William J. McGill. The article on page four of The Mathews Journal, dated 14 November 1907, mentioned in the first paragraph under the heading "The Field of Sport: "McGill, the new pitcher of the St. Louis Browns, is studying for the ministry and won't play baseball on Sunday."

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NW Okie's Corner

Vol 14, Iss 51 Bayfield, Colorado - It was one week to go before Christmas Eve, and all through the house, some took a movie break, while the cat chased the mouse. Oh! Shucks! That is not quite right, but what the hey! We went dashing to town through the snow. What can I say!

We did go to an early Sunday afternoon matinee to see Spielberg's movie, Lincoln. The movie takes place in early January, 1865 with the House of Representatives debating the passage of the 13th Amendment, abolishing slavery, and ends with the assassination of Lincoln, on April 14, 1865, when John Wilkes Booth, a famous actor and Confederate sympathizer, fatally shot President Abraham Lincoln at Ford's Theatre in Washington.

I found myself comparing the Republicans and Democrats of 1865 to the two parties of today (21st century). There was a complete about face, switch of what each believed in back during the Civil War as the Republicans were what the Democrats are today, and vice versa.

Our next step was visiting the Chronicling America old newspapers dating back to January, 1865, for bits of news from that time period. We will include some of those stories in this week's OkieLegacy Ezine and future Ezine's to come.

Besides checking into some history of the 13th amendment, we have been doing some splitting family genealogy files for our Maternal, Paternal and Husband's ancestry, updating our Paris Pioneers Genealogy, where you can view our PARIS, MCGILL and WAGNER ancestry pioneers.

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NW Okie's Corner

Vol 14, Iss 49 Bayfield, Colorado - Gerald McLaughlin sent us this old 1807 map of the Virginia area that we wanted to share with those of you interested in Virginia's history and genealogy research. Hope you find it helpful and informing. I have also been busy doing some cleaning up of my familytree files and splitting my maternal and paternal files to separate files.

I heard from Carolyn Harman Scott, a descendant of Jacob Warwick and Mary Vance, last week concerning the Warwick's DNA Surname Project (Y-DNA Classic Chart), and what is going on with it. They have all of 9 donors on the male side and maybe 4 on the female side.

Carolyn also says, "DNA is a vey useful tool especially in trying to prove or disprove connections. It can point in a direction to look so you don't spend time on a dead end. They are very conclusive if there hasn't been a 'postman' involved. Then it gets interesting. Cost depends on how many markers tested. There are sales, and good ones at that, a couple times of year. For our purposes the minimum of 12 markers right now would suffice and that is pretty reasonable. One right now. You are correct in that what we are really looking for is a male to do the test. I found a William Massie Warwick to do a test which would be on Jacob Warwick/Mary Vance line."

check this out this LINK for more information on the Familytree DNA. Familytreedna is the oldest and has the largest data base. Ancestry had to complicate the picture by getting into the field. The problem with this is that they test for different markers so comparing the results is difficult.

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NW Okie's Corner

Vol 14, Iss 46 Bayfield, CO - I found this family history on the internet that mentions my Hull, Hohl, Diefenbach, Dyer, Kiester, Keister, paternal ancestors. It shows the timeline, chronological historical and genealogical research notes recorded while researching the paternal ancestors, descendants and collateral lines of David William BIRD (1901- ) Including the families of BIRD, BYRD, BIRT, BORDT, CALLAHAN, CURRY, DIEFENBACH, DYER, HULL, HOHL, KEISTER, KIESTER, RIDER, RYDER, RADER, READER, STEUART, STEWART, USHER, WENDEROTH, WINTEROTT. Compiled by: BILL DECOURSEY, New Brighton, MN 55112.

Timeline

  • 1750 - The first Negro slave known to be in the vicinity of present Highland County, Virginia was a girl or young woman purchased for Ann Jane USHER by her guardian about 1750. It is very possible that this slave is the one whom Mrs Loftus PULLIN (nee USHER) set free by her will in 1805. Oren F. Morton, A HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA (1979), p.99, 211.
  • 1750c. Andrew BIRD, Sr. died about 1750 at Smith Creek, Shenandoah Co., VA. See LDS St. George Temple Record #20325; DAUGHTERS OF AMERICAN COLONIST LINEAGE BOOK, (1939).
  • 1750 - Mrs. Betty Jean Clifford wrote in 1975 that a RIDER family, German in origin, came into the Shenandoah Valley from Penna. about 1750 under the spelling READER.
  • 1750 - James STUART patented, in 1750, 300 acres on Stuart's Creek. The land was sold by Robert STUART, in 1800, to Richard MATHEWS, and by him, 1802, to Joseph KINCAID. Oren F. Morton ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.32.
  • 1751 - James STUART was constable in Augusta (later Bath) County, Virginia in 1751. Oren F. Morton ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.54.
  • 1751 - David STEWART was Sheriff of Augusta Co., Virginia, 21 Nov 1751. He married in Wales the widow of John PAUL (died 1745 in Scotland). David STUART, an adult, was baptized by Mr. CRAIG, 21 Jan 1747. Col. David STEUART is said to have lost his life by drowning in the Shenandoah River. Waddell, ANNALS OF AUGUSTA COUNTY, VIRGINIA, pp.366-379,192.
  • 1752 - Philemon BIRD of Middlesex and Richmond County, Va died, 7 Jan 1752. He married Mary LEE, and had children, John born, 4 Feb 1739, Joanna, Philemon 1745, Abner 1735, Damarias 1737, Mary Anne, and Elizabeth. See WILLIAM AND MARY QUARTERLY , v.7,p191 and V.13,p.131.
  • 1752 - Charles STUART and Frances WASHINGTON were married, 23 February 1752, at Orange County, Virginia. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.17, p.19.
  • 1752 - Peter Thomas HULL and Susanna (DIEFFENBACH) HULL settled on land bought from Christopher and Ludwig FRANCISCO, on Cub's Run, Rockingham County, Virginia, on 2 July 1752. This land was part of the Jacob STOVER tracts. Augusta County Deed Bk.3,pp.129-134; Deed Bk.4, p.406; RECORDS OF AUGUSTA COUNTY, VIRGINIA , v.III, p.305. The FRANCISCO family had located in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania with other Germans and Swiss as early as 1709, purchased land from Jacob STOVER in 1738, and later settled in Bath Co., Virginia.

    When Jacob STOVER died in 1740, his property was disposed of to Jacob CASTLE, Ludowick FRANCISCO, John BAUMGARDNER and others. (A Catharine DIEFFENBACH married a BAUMGARTNER and moved to Staunton, Va.)

    During the years 1751 and 1752, Jacob STOVER also sold 470 acres of land in Augusta County to Thomas LEWIS, eldest son of the pioneer, John LEWIS, and brother to Gen. Andrew and Col. Charles LEWIS. Christopher and Ludwig FRANCISCUS sold land to Thomas LEWIS, Gabriel JONES, Peter HULL, Nicholas TROUT, Patrick WILSON, Nicholas NULL, Valentine PENCE and Maurice POUND. In Feb. 1751, Henry FRANCISCUS bought of James WOOD, William RUSSELL, and William GREEN, 310 acres of land on the north and south forks of the south branch of the Potomac (near present Moorefield, West Virginia).

    VIRGINIA MAGAZINE OF HISTORY , v.30,p.181; Smith, Elmer Lewis et.al., THE PENNSYLVANIA GERMANS OF THE SHENANDOAH VALLEY , pp.46-55,passim; John Walter Wayland, THE GERMAN ELEMENT of the SHENANDOAH VALLEY of VIRGINIA (1907 - reprinted 1978), pp.54-56.
  • 1752 - Charles STUART and Susanna GRIGSBY were married, 9 Nov. 1752, at King George County, Virginia.
  • 1752 - James STUART and Elizabeth IRBY were married, 29 Nov. 1752, at Brunswick Co., Virginia.
  • 1753 - Part of the tract on the Shenandoah River, purchased by Peter HULL in 1752, was delivered to Nicholas TROUT on 3 January 1753. Nicholas TROUT was a friend and neighbor of Peter HULL. Not long after this land transaction between HULL and TROUT, they were (as it is told) having a friendly conversation, during which TROUT playfully pulled a gun from HULL's hand, pulling the muzzle toward him. According to witnesses and court records, the gun accidentally discharged, instantly killing TROUT. An inquest was held, and Peter HULL (an influential person in the settlement) was found blameless. The gun was found guilty. From the Original Petitions and Papers filed in Augusta County Court - 1753 - 54, Part I , we find the following: "Inquisition on the body of Nicholas TROUT, 17 July 1753. - Jurors do say that the said Nicholas TROUT, in simplicity, without malice, playing with Peter HULL and seizing a gun in said HULL's hands and pulling its' muzzle towards him 'she' accidentally went off without any act or knowledge of the said HULL and discharged herself with a ball and two great shots into ye breast of said TROUT, of which he died immediately on ye spot, and quit ye gun wherewith ye same was done was entirely in fault for not keeping her bounds, but going off without force or consent." In teste: Peter SCHOLL, Coroner; John STEVENSON, Ledwick FRANCISCO, John MacMICHEL, James BRUSTER, Thomas WATS, Thomas CRAWFORD, Patrick MILICAN, John WILSON, Jacob HARMAN, Niclas NOLL, Hennery DALY, Jacob NICHOLAS. - Augusta County, Virginia Court Records, v.I, p.440.
  • 1753 - "Prior to the year 1754, settlers had established themselves on the South Fork of the Potomac (in present Pendleton, Co., Virginia). The first settler (though not permanent) on the river and in the county as well, was Abraham BURNER, a trader who built a cabin post below Brandywine across the river from the mouth of Hawse's Run." Note: Abraham BURNER, son of the pioneer settler, married to Mary HULL (1760-1840), daughter of Peter Thomas HULL. A. D. Lough, "An account of the Indian Massacre at Fort Seybert" (Franklin, Virginia Newspaper Article, ca.1920s).
  • 1753 - Frederick KEISTER came from Germany to the South Fork of the Potomac in Rockingham County, Va. (now Pendleton Co., Va.) about 1753. Morton, Oren F., HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA , pp.325-326,357,360.
  • 1753 - Caspar WINTEROTH and his wife Margaretha WINTEROTT, sold by deed, "Addition to Wolf Pit", 50 Acres and all improvements, to John Philip STRIDER, on 7 June 1753. Annapolis Hall of Records, LGD 1742-1745, pp.270-272; Carpenter, Vern A., WENDEROTH FAMILIES (1987), p.6.
  • 1753 - William EASTHAM and Frances BIRD were married, (bond) 23 June 1753, at Middlesex Co., Virginia. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.8, p.9.
  • 1753 - In 1753, Valentine SEVIER and his wife, Joanna, sold to Andrew BIRD, 184 acres of land "Between Limestone Ridge and Smiths Creek; corner Andrew BIRD's survey, Robert MILSAP's survey," etc. J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.144-146; Chalkey, v.III, p.315.
  • 1754 - A different family of BYRD's lived in the area of Bath Co., VA contemporaneously with our John BIRD who married Susanna WINTROW. This line of BYRD's may have came from Cheshire, England. John BYRD, the pioneer, was perhaps great-grandson to William BYRD, who came to Henrico, 1674 and grandson to the only brother of Col. William BYRD of Westover (1674-1744), founder of Richmond, Virginia. See Oren F. Morton's, HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA, pp.354-355; Wright, Louis B. and Tinling, Marion, THE GREAT AMERICAN GENTLEMAN (1963).

    This other John BYRD purchased from Adam DICKENSON, in 1754, 215 acres of land on Jackson's River and an adjoining tract of 317 acres to William DEAN. William DEAN sold his tract, in 1765, to his brother, John DEAN. John BYRD was constable at Augusta (later Bath) County, Virginia in 1755. Col. John DICKENSON (1731-1799), married, ca.1758, to Martha USHER, daughter of Edward and --?-- (PERRY) USHER. John DICKENSON was the only son of Adam DICKENSON who, in 1754, sold tracts on the Jackson River to John BYRD and to William DEAN.

    According to Oren F. Morton, "John BYRD, a brother-in-law to John and William DEAN, was killed by Indians two years after his purchase on Jackson's River in 1754. Of the wife and six children who were carried away, John, Jr., is the only one we know to have returned. The family were trying to escape to Fort Dinwiddie. The son became so Indianized that it was quite a while before he could reconcile himself to the ways of his own people. He was a favorite with the red men, and made at least one attempt to go back to them. His wife was a HAMILTON. There were seven children, but Andrew H. BIRD, whose wife was Elizabeth CAPITO, was the only son to stay in Bath. He was twice its sheriff. A sister, two years older than John, Jr., remained with the Indians. Another sister was Sarah, born in 1743. She does not seem to have been carried away, and chose John DEAN as guardian." Morton, Oren F., ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA, pp.28,54,190,192. Also Morton, Oren F., HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA , pp.354-355.
  • 1754 - Loftus PULLIN (son of Loftus PULLIN?) married Ann Jenny USHER, daughter of Edward and --?-- (PERRY) USHER. A petition of 1754 condemns the selling by ordinaries of large quantities of liquor at extravagant rates, whereby money is drained out of the country. The signers expressed their intention of making their own liquor so as to keep their money in the home neighborhood. Among the signers of the petition were Joseph BELL and Loftus PULLEN. Loftus PULLEN patented 321 acres on the Bullpasture between ESTILL and BODKIN, in 1758. Two years later, he sold 240 acres to James SHAW. Oren F. Morton ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.32,52,168.
  • 1755 - British General BRADDOCK led his army to a crushing defeat against the French and their Indian allies at Fort Duquesne (present Pittsburgh, PA), in 1755. The entire frontier was left defenseless and exposed to Indian depredation. The red warriors, flushed with triumph at their easy victory against the British proceeded to assault the frontier with fire and tomahawk. The area of Bath County, Virginia suffered severely. "Fort Dickinson and Fort Lewis were both assaulted. In September 1756, thirteen persons were killed around Fort Dinwiddie, including John BYRD, James MAYSE, James MONTGOMERY, George KINKEAD, and Nicholas CARPENTER. At least two others were wounded; and twenty-eight, mostly children, were carried away. Among those captured by the Indians were Mrs. BYRD and six children, Mrs. KINKEAD and three children, and five children of Joseph CARPENTER. Oren F. Morton, A HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA (1911 - reprinted 1979), pp.74-85; ENCYCLOPEDIA AMERICANA (International Edition, 1965), v.4, pp.383-384.
  • 1755 - Frederick KEISTER (1730-1814) married, ca.1755, to Hannah, daughter of Roger and Hannah (BRITTON?) DYER. The village of Brandywine stands on a part of the original KEISTER homestead. Cleek, Geo. W., EARLY WESTERN AUGUSTA PIONEERS , pp.350,351,385-387; Morton, Oren F., HISTORY OF PENDLETON COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA , pp.239-241.
  • 1755 - William STEUART (1732c.-1797) married, before 1757, to Margaret USHER, daughter of Edward USHER. They had children: James STEUART; Edward STEUART married Mary CALLAHAN; John STEUART married Hannah HICKLIN; William STEUART married Virginia GWIN; Usher STEUART; Mary STEUART married Charles CALLAHAN; and Jane STEUART married James HICKLIN.

    Morton credits William STEUART (1732c.-1797) as being the earliest teacher in what is now Highland County, Virginia, "having taught quite regularly from the time of his arrival about 1755. He appears to have been well educated, especially in the mathematics. Oren F. Morton, A HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA (1911, reprinted 1979), p.150.
  • 1755 - A James STEWART served as Captain of the second column of the Augusta Militia, under Col. John DICKENSON, in 1755. Hennings Statutues. Among the list of Officers who were present in action on the banks of the Monongahela River, on 9 July, 1755, was Captain STEWART of the Virginia troops. Six Hundred men were killed or wounded. Florence Smith Dickerson's, THE JAMES STEART FAMILY , p.27.
  • 1755 - On 27 Nov. 1755, the Vestry of Augusta Parish met, and designated processioners (to report before March 1st next) as follows: biz., "John HARRISON, Jr., and Daniel SMITH, in Capt. Daniel HARRISON's company. Thomas MOORE and David ROBINSON, in Capt. Ephraim LOVE's company, and to head of Brock's Gap. Matthew PATTON and William DYER, on South Fork of the Branch of Potowmack, Jacob PETERS and Henry FRANCISCO, on Mill Creek and Shelton's tract," etc. J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.182.
  • 1756 - John BYRD of Jackson's River, Augusta Co., Virginia was killed by Indians 14 Sept. 1756. His wife and 6 children were captured and made prisoners.

    Mrs. BYRD and her children were captured while fleeing to Fort Dinwiddie on the lower Jackson's River. According to Morton, "There is no further account of the mother and four of the children. The oldest, then a girl of ten years, is said to have married an Indian. The only one to return was John BYRD, Jr. who was eight years old when carried away. When he was returned, now a boy of sixteen, he was wearing a gold chain fastened to punctures in his nose and ears. His bravery put him in high favor with his captors. They had him climb trees to drive bears out of them, but took care that he was not harmed. The only time he took fright was when he heard a gun and knew a bear was making for him. The Indians were greatly attached to the boy and intended making him a chief. He made two attempts to return to them, but was prevented, and became ancestor of the BYRDS of Bath and Highland Counties." Oren F. Morton, A HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA (1979), pp-81-82; See also: VIRGINIA MAGAZINE , v.2,pp.399-402; Morton, Oren F., ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.82.
  • 1756 - A list of returns in the Augusta Parish Vestry Book, 1756, includes the names of David RALSTON, Valentine SEVIER, Andrew BIRD, Moses BIRD, John Joseph and Robert CRAVENS, Thomas MOORE, et.al. J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.182; Chalkey, v.II, pp.442-4.
  • 1757 - James STEWART, son of William and Margaret (USHER) STEUART, was born, 2 January 1757, in Augusta County (later Bath Co.), Virginia. See Pension #S6159.
  • 1757 - "In 1757, one of the major atrocities of the Indians took place at Cartmell's Gap, two miles from the Blue Ridge in the Shenandoah Valley. The road swung here and went through Stanton Courthouse." Florence Smith Dickerson's, THE JAMES STEWART FAMILY , p.27.
  • In the summer of 1757, James STUART ("probably brother-in-law to Ralph LAVERTY") and John MOORE were killed in Indian Attacks on Fort Dinwiddie on the Cowpasture River. Among the captives who were carried away in this raid were James STUART, Jr., Mrs. MOORE and her children. Morton, Oren F., ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.83,200; Oren F. Morton, A HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA (1979), p.81; Lyman C. Draper, THE PRESTON REGISTER , p.154-157; Florence Smith Dickerson's, THE JAMES STEWART FAMILY , p.53.

    In VIRGINIA WILLS AND ADMINISTRATIONS (1632-1800) Torrence -- Virginia State Library, we find James STEWART absent from Augusta Co., Virginia, after his death in 1757, and again in 1758.
  • 1757 - Roger DYER of Augusta County, Virginia in his will dated 24 Feb 1757 (proved 21 Mar 1759) mentions his wife Hanna DYER; sons James DYER (under 21 years of age) and William DYER, daughters Hanna GESTER (KIESTER), Hester PATTON, and Sarah HASE; and a Grandson, Roger DYER, son of William DYER. To his daughter Hanna (DYER) KIESTER he bequeathed "a certain tract of land lying in Hampshire County containing 427 acres". Witnesses to the Will of Roger DYER were William MILLER, Adam RIDER, and William GIBSON. Will Book 2, page 301; Sara G. Clark, "The Pattons, A Pioneer Family in Kentucky," REGISTER OF THE KENTUCKY STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY , pp.137-138; Cleek, Geo. W., EARLY WESTERN AUGUSTA PIONEERS , pp.350-352;
  • 1757 - Adam RIDER was a witness to the Will of Roger DYER of Augusta Co., Virginia on 24 Feb 1757. On 16 May 1759 Adam RIDER further proved the will and it was probated. Augusta County Will Book 2, page 301.
  • 1757 - A John BIRD was killed in the Indian Wars in 1757. VIRGINIA MAGAZINE , v.2,p.402. This John BIRD had a son John who lived in Bath Co., and married a HAMILTON. He was a contemporary of our John BIRD, but this was a different family. See also: Oren Morton's ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY , P.190; Oren Morton's HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY , pp354-355.
  • 1757 - Abraham BIRD (1737-1820) married, 1757, probably in Shenandoah Co., Virginia, to Rachel ZEIGLER. He served as Legislator and held the rank of Lieutenant in the Shenandoah County, Virginia Militia in 1776. He was a Colonel in 1778. He was a representative of Dunmore County in the Virginia Constitutional Convention in 1776 and represented both Dunmore and Shenandoah counties in the Virginia House of Delegates for 11 sessions from 1776 to 1796. Abraham and Rachel (ZEIGLER) BIRD had children: Magdalene married Reuben ALLEN; Elizabeth m. Thomas JONES; Catherine m. John THOMAS; Margaret m. Joseph HAWKINS; Mary m. Reuben MOORE; Andrew BIRD m. Mary HOLKER; Mark BIRD m. Sarah GORDON; Abraham BIRD m. Catharine FRY; and George BIRD m. Hannah ALLEN. A ROSTER OF REVOLUTIONARY ANCESTORS OF THE INDIANA DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION , v.1, p.52; D.A.R. #562622.
  • 1757 - George HULL (1757-1852), son of Peter Thomas and Susannah Margaret (DIEFENBACH) HULL, was born 15 Oct 1757. He was a soldier in the American Revolution. See Virkus's ABRIDGED COMPENDIUM OF AMERICAN GENEALOGY , v.1,p.565, v.5,p.159, v.7,p.196.
  • 1758 - In 1758 George Washington was "commander-in-chief of the Virginia troops, consisting of two regiments, one led by himself and the other by Colonel BYRD." Waddell,nANNALS OF AUGUSTA COUNTY, VIRGINIA (1886), p.103.
  • 1758c- Col. John DICKENSON (1731-1799), married, ca.1758, to Martha USHER, daughter of Edward and --?-- (PERRY) USHER. John DICKENSON was the only son of Adam DICKENSON. At the age of 22, John DICKENSON was a captain of horse, and during the next 25 years he saw very much military service on the frontier. He was appointed Overseer of roads in Augusta County in 1754. In 1756, he was appointed a Justice of Augusta County, but in 1779 he declined further service. In 1763, he was granted a tavern license. After being wounded in at least two skirmishes with the Indians, he was severely wounded in the shoulder at the battle of Point Pleasant, and for this injury he was granted a pension of 50 pounds per year. In 1777, with the rank of colonel, he returned to Point Pleasant at the head of a regiment of militia.

    Colonel DICKENSON was a large holder of real estate, owning land on the Greenbrier and even in North Carolina. John and Martha (USHER) DICKENSON had children: Mary married Samuel SHREWSBURY; Martha married John SHREWSBURY; Nancy; Adam; Jean; and John. The only grandson in the male line to finish his days in Bath County was John Usher Dickenson, who returned about 1850 and was the first proprietor of the hotel at Millboro. Oren F. Morton ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.38-39,53,60.
  • 1758 - Roger DYER died 28 Apr 1758 at Fort Seybert. His son, William DYER, was also killed in the same Indian massacre. Another son, James and a daughter, were captured by the Indians. James escaped after two years, and a year later negotiated the release of his sister. It is not clear whether there was one or two sisters captured and released. The "Sarah DYER" who was married to Peter HAWES at the time of the Indian raid may have been the "Mary DYER" who later married Robert DAVIS or Mary DYER may have been a daughter of William DYER and grand-daughter of Roger DYER.
  • 1758 - Fort Seybert "was in the northern part of the present county of Highland, then Augusta. There the inhabitants of the surrounding country had taken shelter from the Indians. Between thirty and forty persons of both sexes and all ages were in the enclosure. No Indians having yet appeared, a youth named James DYER and his sister went outside one day for some purpose, and had not proceeded far before they came in view of forty or fifty Shawnees going toward the fort. Hurrying back to provided for their own safety and give the alarm, they were overtaken and captured. The place was incapable of withstanding a vigorous assault, and the garrison was poorly supplied with ammunition. Captain SEYBERT, therefore, determined to surrender, and did so in spite of the opposition of some of the people. The gate was thrown open, and the money and other stipulated articles were handed over to the Indians. Thereupon, one of the most ruthless tragedies of Indian warfare was perpetrated. The inmates of the fort were arranged in two rows and nearly all of them were tomahawked. A few, spared from caprice or some other cause, were carried off into captivity. Young DYER was the only captive who ever returned. He was taken to Logstown, thence to the Muskingum, and thence to Chilicothe, where he remained a prisoner nearly two years. Accompanying the Indians to Fort Pitt, he there concealed himself in a hovel, and after two years more returned." Waddell, ANNALS OF AUGUSTA COUNTY, VIRGINIA (1886), pp.102-103. See also Morton, Oren F., HISTORY OF PENDLETON COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA , pp.39-51; A. D. Lough, "An account of the Indian Massacre at Fort Seybert" (Franklin, Virginia Newspaper Article, ca.1920's); Sara G. Clark, "The Pattons, A Pioneer Family in Kentucky," REGISTER OF THE KENTUCKY STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, pp.131-151.

    Mr. Dale BOWMAN of Plattsmouth, Nebraska, a descendant of Roger DYER visited the site of the Fort Seybert Massacre in 1986 and was disturbed that no marker had been placed at the site. With the help of BOWMAN and other DYER descendants, a bronzed plate was placed on the wall surrounding the common grave site. It reads as follows: "Grave site of 17 Victims of the Fort Seybert Massacre April 28, 1758. Known Names Cpt. Jacob Seybert & Wife. Roger Dyer, Wallace Boy, William Dyer, Henry Haus, John Regger & Wife.
  • 1758 - James and Sarah DYER were taken captive by the Indians, 28 April 1758, and held in captivity for about three years. Cleek, Geo. W., EARLY WESTERN AUGUSTA PIONEERS, p.351; Morton, Oren F., HISTORY OF PENDLETON COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA , p.89; Wayland, John W., HISTORY OF ROCKINGHAM COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.444; J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.207- James Samuel CURRY married 6 Oct 1880 to Mollie J. HARMAN. Mollie HARMAN was the daughter of George and Susan (SMITH) HARMAN, both born in Pendleton County, West Va.. "Her great-great-grandfather was Captain Robert DAVIS, who led the whites in pursuit of the Indians after the massacre of Fort Sibert. Mary DYER, then twelve years of age, was among those made captive, and she remained with the Indians three years. On her return she became the wife of Captain DAVIS, and she was the great-great-grandmother of Mrs. James Samuel CURRY." ROCKINGHAM COUNTY, VIRGINIA PERSONALS (1884), "Dr. James Samuel CURRY", p.14.
  • 1758 - Peter HULL and wife, Susanna Margaret, on 13 May 1758, sold to Charles RUSH, two hundred and ten acres of the larger tract HULL had purchased of FRANCISCO in 1752. - Records of Augusta County, VA, v.III, p.351; Deed Book 20, p.8, Staunton, VA.
  • 1758c. Arnold CUSTER died in Augusta County, Va. ca.1758. He bought land in the Gap of the North Mountain on Sorando 1754. His son, Conrad CUSTER, age 18, chose Abraham BIRD as guardian. Conrad CUSTER died ca.1829 in Bourbon Co., Kentucky. - Info from Harold T. Smutz, Webster Groves, Missouri.
  • 1758 - Hannah KEISTER, daughter of Frederick and Hannah (DYER) KEISTER, was born ca.1758. She married George HULL (1757-1852), son of Peter Thomas HULL and Margaret Susanna (DIEFENBACH) HULL.
  • 1758 - On 17 August 1758, Daniel HARRISON and Matthew PATTON signed Margaret DYER's bond as administratrix of William DYER. Will Book 2, pp.233,264; J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.208.
  • 1758 - William MOORE and Betsey BIRD were married, 21 Aug. 1758, at Norfolk Co., Virginia.
  • 1758 - John CURRY and Jane STRIBLING were married, 20 Sept. 1758, at Stafford County, Virginia.
  • 1759 - Edward STEUART (1759-1844), son of William and Margaret (USHER) STEUART, was born in February 1759. He married, 1786, to Mary CALLAHAN, daughter of Charles CALLAGHAN. Pension File #W6170.
  • 1759 - George WILSON sold, in 1759, a 150 acre tract on the Cowpasture River at Shaw's Fork, to William STEUART. The same year he sold an adjoining tract to James SHAW. SHAW sold to James BODKIN, 1766, and BODKIN, in 1794, sold to James STEUART. Rockingham Co., Virginia Land Records; SIM's INDEX ; Oren F. Morton ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , pp.32-33. "William STEUART, a young Scotchman, had a thrilling experience in reaching these mountains. Being well educated, he expected to follow a profession. The ship on which he took passage was captured by Spanish pirates, and the crew killed. He was the only passenger and was put on the South Atlantic shore with no clothing save a piece of canvas and without his chest full of books. Thence he drifted northward to the Augusta colony, doing at first manual labor. His soft hands and intellectual air brought him a welcome invitation to teach school, and he followed this calling the rest of his life. But downcast at the loss of his beloved library, he was content to spend his days in the frontier wilderness. STEUART settled just below the mouth of Shaw's Fork. In marrying Margaret USHER (daughter of Edward USHER) he became brother-in-law to Loftus PULLIN." Morton, Oren F., HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA , pp.71-72,252,338-340.
  • 1759 - The French were defeated at Fort Duquense (site of present Pittsburg, Penna.) in 1759. The Indians, now deprived of French support, paused in their raids in the Shenandoah Valley.
  • 1759 - "At a Court held for Augusta County, May the 16, 1759: This last will and testament of Roger DYER dec'd. being this day further proved by the oath of Adam HIDER (RIDER?), another of the witnesses thereto, was admitted to record, and on the motion of Hannah DYER, the executrix, therein named who made oath according to law certificate is granted for her for obtaining a probate in due form; she having with Abraham SMITH & Ephraim LOVER, her securities, catered into and acknowledged their bond." Sara G. Clark, "The Pattons, A Pioneer Family in Kentucky," REGISTER OF THE KENTUCKY STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY , pp.139-140.
  • 1759 - "The settlement of Roger DYER's estate in 1759, recorded at Staunton, Va., shows that in 1757 or 1758 he furnished Robert SCOTT with provisions. Roger DYER lived on the South Branch of the Potomac in either present Hardy or Hampshire County, West Va." VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE , v.30,p.399.
  • 1759 - Hopewell furnace, on French creek, Berks Co., PA was built 1759 by William BIRD, for whom 'Birdsboro' was named. His son, Mark BIRD, succeeded him. Egle, William Henry, NOTES AND QUERIES , (1893) 4th series, v.I, p.134.
  • 1759 - Anthony LOGAN and Agnes CURRY were married, 9 Dec. 1759, at Goochland Co., Virginia.
  • 1760 - John CRAVENS, son of Robert and Mary (HARRISON) CRAVENS married sometime between 1758 and 1762, Margaret (HIATT) DYER, widow of William DYER. On 15 Sept. 1758, Henry SMITH signed Thomas FULTON's bond as security for Margaret DYER. Following her marriage to John CRAVENS the latter assigned the bond to his father Robert. (Augusta County Judgments, Oct. 1765, Henry SMITH vs. Samuel COWDEN.) In 1762, "John CRAVENS and Margaret his wife, late Margaret DYER administratrix of William DYER, deceased," brought a bill of complaint vs. Charles WILSON, regarding payment of a bond of WILSON to DYER, dated 24 December 1752. (Augusta Court Judgments A, 1762.) Margaret (HIATT) DYER-CRAVENS was the daughter of John and Margaret HIATT. The HIATTS were Quakers, and are said to have come from the British Isles. J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.261,267,342.
  • 1760c- William RIDER (1730c.-1819) married about 1760. He had children: William J. RIDER m. 1786 Mary BRISCOE; James RIDER m. 1798 Sarah CHESTNUT; Richard RIDER m. 1796 Agnes KILPATRICK; John RIDER m. (1) Susanna CURRY, m. (2) Susan STOUT; Elizabeth RIDER m. 1798 Adam BIRD; Sarah RIDER m. 1807 Joseph HUTTON; and Thomas RIDER m. 1812 Rebecca MATHENY.
  • 1760 - In 1760, Anne (LAFFERTY) STEWART, widow of James STEWART (killed by the Shawnee Indians in 1757), placed her son, James STEWART (age 17?) under the guardianship of of Thomas THOMPSON, of Delaware, but THOMPSON later was himself killed by the redman, and in 1762, young James was placed under the guardianship of John HAMILTON, by his own choice, under the court Justices of Augusta County, Virginia. - Florence Smith Dickerson's, THE JAMES STEWART FAMILY , p.53.
  • 1761 - On 2 Jan 1761, various settlers in Augusta Co. presented a "petition for a road from Adam READER's Mines to Isaac ROBERTSON's from thence to widow WRIGHT's Mill, from thence to Thomas HARRISON's in the Great Road to the Court House." Cornelius RUDDELL was appointed Surveyor of Highways from REEDER's Mines. Chalkey, Lyman, CHRONICLES OF THE SCOTCH-IRISH SETTLEMENT IN VIRGINIA , v.I,pp.152,429,489. Some signers of the above petition were from families that had resided earlier in Sussex County, Delaware. Harrison, J. Houston, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), pp.7,223-224,passim.
  • 1761 - John STUART purchased, 1761, from Robert AMBERCROMBIE, 320 acres of land on the east side of Jackson's River above the mouth of Falling Spring Run in the "Lewis Land Grant" in Bath County, Virginia. He sold this land the same year to William MANN. Oren F. Morton, ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA (1917 - Reprinted 1978), p.28.
  • 1761 - William STEUART purchased, 1761, from William SPROWL, 168 acres of land on the Cowpasture River. Oren F. Morton ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.31.
  • 1761 - "James STEWART had married Ann LAFFERTY in Ireland, she a member of the Irish gentry." Florence Smith Dickerson's, THE JAMES STEWART FAMILY , p.27. "The will book of the court, 1761, fo.215, Ann STEWART, as widow of James STEWART was receiving rental from lands in Kilcoskan, Dublin Co., Ireland. Perogative Court of Ireland. Thomas LEACH and James SHIEL -- Witnesses." HISTORICAL MAGAZINE OF VIRGINIA , Vol.21 (1913), p.372.
  • 1761 - The following certificate was recorded, 6 June 1761, in Liber G, p.20, Frederick County Circuit Court, to wit: "Provincial Court April term 1753. I hereby certify that Casparus WINERROTH came into Court and was in due form Naturalized pursuant to and act of Parliament in that case made and provided. In testimony whereof I have here unto set my hand and affixed th seal of the said Court, 27 day of April Anno Domini 1753 - R. Burdis [clerk]."
  • 1761 - Anna Marie Catherine WINTEROTH, b. 1737 married, 23 July 1761, at Frederick, Md. to John Philip JAZOB.
  • 1762 "Know ye: John HAMILTON and Robert STEWART, of Augusta County, held and firmly bound to Silas HART, William PRESTON, John POAGE, John ARCHER -- Justices, in the sum of fifty pounds, as guardians of James STUART, son of James STUART, deceased." February 1762--Court Record; Florence Smith Dickerson's, THE JAMES STEWART FAMILY , p.53.
  • 1762 - On 14 Apr 1762, Abraham BIRD acquired 235 acres at Brock's Gap adjoining land owned by Conrod LAMB in Rockingham Co., VA.
  • 1762 - Frederick KEISTER received his certificate of naturalization, May 18, 1762. Chalkey, Lyman, RECORDS OF AUGUSTA COUNTY, VIRGINIA , v.1,p.97.
  • 1762 - Philemon BIRD and Mary LEE were married, 2 November 1762, at Middlesex Co., Virginia. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.7, p.3.
  • 1762 - Andrew BIRD, Abraham BIRD, and Benjamin HARRISON qualified as Captains of the Militia in Augusta County, 18 November 1762. J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.298.
  • 1762c- Richard CURRY (1740-1804) and wife Janet settled in Back Creek Valley in present Highland County, Virginia before 1782. They had children: Elizabeth M. (1763-1859) married John SHARP; Susanna married 1785 William ERVINE; James m. 1786 Mary ERVINE; Andrew; John; Joseph; Mary; Catharine m. Daniel MATHENY; Jean m. Archibald MATHENY. Morton, Oren F., HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA , pp.277-278.
  • 1763 - Simon VOGEL and wife Elizabeth baptized the following children on 10 Apr 1763, at Trinity Lutheran Church in Lancaster, Pennsylvania: Johanne Heinrich, b. 22 Nov 1762; Elizabeth, b.18 Apr 1761, and Christian, b. 4 Feb 1757. It should be noted that BIRD is the English translation of the German "VOGEL" or "FOGEL". The BIRD name was probably VOGEL before coming to this country. Many of the families who later settled in the Shenandoah Valley and Augusta County, and who were associated with our BIRD family were earlier members of this Trinity Lutheran Church. On the same day, 10 Apr 1763, was baptized Eva, b. Jan 1763, dau. of Johanne Simon JEAGER and his wife Anna Margaret.
  • 1763 - A tavern license was granted to John DICKENSON, at Augusta County (later Bath County), Virginia in 1763. Oren F. Morton ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.51. (Note: Col. John DICKENSON (1731-1799), married, ca.1758, to Martha USHER, daughter of Edward and --?-- (PERRY) USHER. John DICKENSON was the only son of Adam DICKENSON who conveyed tracts of land, in 1754, to John BYRD and William DEAN.)
  • 1763 - Valentine SEVIRE of Frederick, farmer deeded Land, 18 Apr 1763, to Andrew BYRD, Miller - Deed Book 11, p.218.
  • 1763 - The Pontiac War broke out in June 1763. CORNSTALK, "a Shawnee chieftain of unusual ability," managed to deal a heavy blow on the Greenbrier and the settlements to the southeast. "BOUQUET's victory at Brushy Run near the site of Pittsburg, brought an early end to the war with PONTIAC. The Indians were required to give up the prisoners they had collected during the preceding ten years. In the number were Mrs. MAYSE, John BYRD, and doubtless several other persons belonging to the Bath area." Morton, Oren F., ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , pp.84-86.
  • 1763c- Frederick KEISTER served as a soldier in the Colonial Wars in the Augusta Militia. Boogher, William Fletch, GLEANINGS OF VIRGINIA HISTORY , p.41; Eckenrode, E.J., COLONIAL SOLDIERS IN VIRGINIA , p.37 (listed as Frederick Eister).
  • 1764c- John BYRD, Jr. married Mary Ann HAMILTON, daughter of William and Alice HAMILTON. The HAMILTON's were Scots, but came from Co. Tyrone, Ireland, ca. 1745, to New Castle Co., Delaware, then to Chester, PA., then to Augusta Co., locating first in the Calf Pasture, then on the Jackson River in (now) Bath. Info from Marilyn Schuelszky of Fort Wayne, Ind. (1979), a HAMILTON descendant. See also D.A.R. #395267 and #509203.
  • 1764 - "Jammy STEWART is mentioned in a letter of February 1764 at Fort Lookout, with Captain SAYERS, KeGLEY's Virginia Frontier. James STEWART volunteered to fight the Indians at an early age, and with his brother Ralph was in a group of Rangers who overtook and rescued six white captives from ninety-six Indians. After the Indians were released, the boys followed them, and surprising them at night, they killed five Indians." Florence Smith Dickerson's, THE JAMES STEWART FAMILY , p.53.
  • 1764 - On 9 June 1764, Peter Thomas HULL sold his farm in the Valley of Virginia, and he and his sons acquired land in Crab Apple Bottom, the garden spot of what is now Highland County, Virginia. "Below him were Bernard LANTZ about this time, Michael ARBOGAST and John GUM in 1766, Palsor NAIGLEY in 1768, and Peter ZICKAFOOSE in 1772." "The HULL family was very prominent in the early annals of Highland County. The pioneer himself was a man of large means for his day. Peter, his oldest son, increased the estate, owning a large portion of Crabbottom, his possessions in 1818 included 16 slaves, 19 horses, 43 cows, and 60 sheep. He was an officer in the Revolution, a colonel of militia subsequent thereto, and a legislator also." He was very influential but also domineering. Major Peter HULL, his son, lived at McDowell, where he was a heavy landholder." Morton, Oren F., HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA , pp.87,223,251,303-305.
  • 1764 - Thomas BEALE married, 10 July 1764, at Augusta Co., Virginia, to Jane CURRIE of Lancaster County (Penna. or Virginia?). Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.4, p.2.
  • 1764 - "Hardesty in his BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY says, that Captain BYRD who had been employed in 1764 to open a road from James River to where the town of Abingdon now stands, probably using Jefferson's map of Virginia engraved in France in 1755, and on which this river (the Kanawha River) did not appear, named it "New River." Rev. Ulysses S. A. Heavener, GERMAN NEW RIVER SETTLEMENT: VIRGINIA (1976 Reprint), p.3.
  • 1765 - On 20 March 1765, John CRAVENS was appointed guardian of Roger and John DYER, "infant orphans of William DYER, deceased." (Order Book 9, p.248.) J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.261.
  • 1766 - About 1764, James and Ralph STEWART left Fort Lookout and went to the New River where they scouted for eighteen months, seeing only one white man. Upon his return, James STEWART married, on 20 August 1766, to Miss Isabelle FOSTER, of Augusta County, Virginia. They had one son, James STEWART. Florence Smith Dickerson's, THE JAMES STEWART FAMILY , p.53.
  • 1766 - William MAY and Betty DYER were married (bond), 20 Sept. 1766, at Amelia Co., Virginia.
  • 1767 - James STUART was a resident of the Cowpasture in Borden's land in 1767. This same year he was on the militia list of William BOWYER.
  • 1767 - Anna Barbara and Johan Peter WINTEROTH, children of CASPAR and Margaretha (STREP) WENDEROTH, were confirmed, by Rev. LANGE, 10 Feb 1767, at the Evangelical Reformed Church, Frederick, Maryland. Carpenter, Vern A., WENDEROTH FAMILIES (1987), p.10-11.
  • 1767 - John BIRD (1729-1819) married, 1767, to Susanna WINTROW (probably a dau. of Johannes Casper and Anna Margaretha WENDEROTH of Frederick, Frederick Co., Md.). See Oren F. Morton, HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY VIRGINIA , pp.264-267; Blackwell, Lyle M., MY FATHERS (1979), pp.55-64; Carpenter, Vern A., WENDEROTH FAMILIES (1987), p.10-11,78. Note: There were two by the name of John BIRD/BYRD who resided in the vicinity of present Highland Co., Virginia at about the same time. Although their descendants appear to have married in to the same families they seem to be unrelated to each other. There is much confusion in some of the early records as to which John BIRD the record pertains. See Blackwell, Lyle M., MY FATHERS (1979), pp.55-64.
  • 1767 - Among the tithables of Pittsylvania County, VA in 1767, was Francis BIRD. VIRGINIA MAGAZINE , v.24, p.271. Was this perhaps John Francis BIRD? Francis was used as a middle name by many of the descendants of John BIRD (1729-1819).
  • 1767 - Nicholas CURRY, of Fayette County, Kentucky, in a deposition, 19 November 1800, in McWILLIAMS vs. HOLLINGSHEAD, states that his father settled in Augusta County, Virginia in the fall of 1767. J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.400.
  • 1769 - Mark THORP and Susanna STEWART were married, Nov. 1769, at King George County, Virginia. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.5, p.15.
  • 1769 - Townsend DADE and Jane STUART were married, 11 Dec. 1769, at Stafford Co., Virginia.
  • 1770 - Peter Thomas HOHL (1681-1770), pastor of the Lutheran church at St. Stephanskirche parish, about ten miles from Worms, died 15 July 1770. He married Anastasia Maria von EBRMARK (1690-1763). He was brother to Johannes HOHL, and uncle of Peter Thomas HULL who arrived at Philadelphia, PA, 30 May 1741.
  • 1770 - Andrew BIRD and David BELL, as administrators of the estate of Daniel HARRISON, were sureties on the bond of Benjamin HARRISON, 25 August 1770. J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.213.
  • 1770 - In 1770 the General Assembly of Virginia formed several new counties and reformed the boundaries of two others. The new counties formed were Rockingham, Rockbridge, and Greenbrier. Rockingham was taken wholly from Augusta, and Rockbridge from both Augusta and Botetourt. Botetourt had been created in 1769, and was the first county carved from Augusta. In the act forming these counties, "Benjamin BYRD's house" is mentioned in the setting of the boundaries for Rockingham. J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.238.
  • 1770 - John BIRD served in the Militia from 1770-1777. He was elected a Lieutenant under Lieutenant Col. William Christian and Lieutenant Col. James Robertson. He fought in the battle of Kings mountain, Tennessee. A LIST OF VIRGINIA STATE SOLDIERS AND SEAMEN WHO HAVE RECEIVED CERTIFICATES FOR THE BALANCE OF THEIR FULL PAY ; D.A.R. #1-66091; See also WAR FIVE , an unpublished manuscript in the Virginia State Library. Information from William H. Shields of Fort Myers, FL (1979).
  • 1770 - Lewis BIRD's will was probated in Frederick County, Virginia, on 7 Aug 1770. Only a son, John BIRT is listed by name, though other children are mentioned. The executor was Jordan Jacob MILLER. The witnesses were Jacob HOLDMAN and John ROUSE. Lewis BIRD-BIRT's wife's given name was Hannah. Frederick Co., VA, Will Book #4. See also VIRGINIA MAGAZINE , v. , p.205; John Walter Wayland, THE GERMAN ELEMENT of the SHENANDOAH VALLEY of VIRGINIA (1907 - reprinted 1978), p.218.
  • 1771 - In 1771, James STEWART was deeded 200 acres of land near Glade Spring Creek, from Blaney MILLS, and 160 acres of land on a branch of the Roanoke River, granted to Robert EWING, from James STARRETT. Florence Smith Dickerson's, THE JAMES STEWART FAMILY , p.54.
  • 1771 - John BEARD purchased 70 acres land on Jennings Branch, Augusta Co., VA in 1771. book 1, pg. 537.
  • 1771 - "Joseph PEARSE deposition, 8 April 1771. Edward SAMPSON kept school in the neighborhood of Capt. Andrew BIRD's and boarded with BIRD, and Thomas MOORE's children went to him. He (SAMPSON) and BIRD frequently got drunk together, and had frequent frolics, when BIRD became violent and threatened to kill everybody." J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.144-145; Chalkey, v.I, p.366.
  • 1773 - John BYRD and John LEWIS were road Overseers for the area from the Cowpasture to Warm Springs, 1773. Morton, Oren F., ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.60. 1773 - John RIDER (1773-1855), son of William RIDER, was born in 1773.
  • 1774 - From 1764 until 1774, aside from a few incidents, there was peace between the Indians and the white men in the Valley of Augusta, but the persistent settlement of greater numbers of white men resulted in war with the Indian breaking out in the summer of 1774. Governor DUNMORE led a force down the Ohio from Wheeling, while General Andrew LEWIS with the militia of the Valley reinforced by a few troops from Bedford and Culpeper, marched down the Great Kanawha, reaching Point Pleasant in early October 1774. Companies from the present counties of Bath, Highland and Pendleton serving under General LEWIS were commanded by Captains John DICKENSON, Andrew LOCKRIDGE, Samuel WILSON, and John SKIDMORE. At Point Pleasant, LEWIS's army became engaged in a battle with the Indians which, although resulting in great losses on both sides, resulted in the battle weary Indians agreeing to a peace that lasted until they were again stirred up by the British in 1778. The Battle of Point Pleasant in 1774, is now considered by many to have been the opening battle of the American Revolution. Oren F. Morton, A HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA (1979), pp.100-106; Patricia Burton, THE SECOND "COL. CHARLES LEWIS DAY" (1978), passim; Patricia Burton, VIRGINIA BEGINS TO REMEMBER (1980), passim.
  • 1774 - On 16 June 1774, some of the leading citizens in the vicinity of Woodstock, Dunmore Co., Virginia, called a public meeting which, presided over by Rev. Peter MUHLENBERG, "adopted spirited and patriotic resolutions." A committee of safety and correspondence was also appointed, consisting of Rev. Peter MUHLENBERG, Francis SLAUGHTER, Abraham BIRD, Tavener BEALE, John TIPTON, and Abraham BOWMAN. John Walter Wayland, THE GERMAN ELEMENT of the SHENANDOAH VALLEY of VIRGINIA (1907 - reprinted 1978), p.142,224; John Walter Wayland's "The Germans of the Valley," THE VIRGINIA MAGAZINE , v.X, p.47.
  • 1774 - Captain John STUART was a member of General Andrew LEWIS's expedition against the Indians in the year 1774, and at the battle of Point Pleasant, Va. Capt. John STUART married Agatha, the second dau. of Thomas and Jane (STROTHER) LEWIS, and widow of Capt. John FROG, who was killed, 10 Oct 1774, at the battle of Point Pleasant. Mrs. Stuart was a niece of Gen. Andrew LEWIS, and a granddaughter of John LEWIS, a native of Donegal Co., Ireland "who slew the Irish Lord, settled Augusta Co., Va., located the town of Staunton, and furnished five sons to fight the battles of the American Revolution," and who died at Bellefonte, Augusta, Feb. 1, 1762, aged 84 years. Children of Capt. John STUART included: Lewis STUART of Greenbrier Co., Charles A. STUART, and one daughter, who became the wife of Col. CROCKET, of Wythe Co., Va. VIRGINIA HISTORICAL REGISTER , v.5,p.181; NEW YORK GENEALOGICAL AND BIOG. RECORD , v.9,p.47; Patricia Burton, THE SECOND "COL. CHARLES LEWIS DAY" (1978), passim; Patricia Burton, VIRGINIA BEGINS TO REMEMBER (1980), passim.
  • 1774 - Col. Abraham BIRD, of Shenandoah, was son of Andrew BIRD, died 1750, of Augusta Co., Va, and grandson of Abraham BIRD of Calvert county, Md. Col. BIRD was colonel of Revolutionary militia, 1778; representative of Dunmore (present Pocahontas County) in the Virginia House of Burgesses (1774-1775) and the Virginia constitutional convention of 1776. He was representative of Dunmore and Shenandoah in the Virginia House of delegates eleven sessions in the period 1776-1796. He married Rachel ZEIGLER. He died in Kentucky. He had: Captain Abraham, Shenandoah Revolutionary militia Captain; Mark, married Sarah GORDON; Capt. George; Magdalene; Elizabeth; Mary; Catherine; Margaret. Wayland, John W., HISTORY OF SHENANDOAH COUNTY, VIRGINIA ., pp. 584-585,691-693.
  • 1774 - Peter HOAL received a grant for 90 acres on Shaver's Run, Augusta Co., Va. in 1774. Bk.1,p.570.
  • 1774 - Peter Thomas HULL furnished supplies during Dunmore's war in 1774. His claims were verified in the Court of Augusta Co., Virginia, 18 August 1775. Morton's HISTORY OF PENDLETON COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA , p.393.
  • 1775 - A John BYRD was in Dunmore's War in 1775. See Morton's ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
  • 1775 - Charles CALLAHAN and wife Ann --- lived on Dry River, Rockingham Co., VA in 1775.
  • 1775 - Among the representatives from the Shenandoah Valley counties to the House of Burgesses and of the Virginia Convention were the following: James PATTON Augusta County 1754-55; Samuel McDOWELL Augusta County 1772-76; Charles LEWIS Augusta County 1773-74; Thomas LEWIS Augusta County 1775-76; Abraham BIRD Dunmore County 1775-76; John TIPTON Dunmore County 1776; John Walter Wayland, THE GERMAN ELEMENT of the SHENANDOAH VALLEY of VIRGINIA (1907 - reprinted 1978), p.224.
  • 1776 - The 1966 D.A.R. Patriot Index lists: "John Jacob WINTERRODE, b. 20 April 1735, d.3 Feb 1797, m. Ann Barbara ---, Pvt. Penna."
  • 1776 - Peter Thomas HULL, Sr. (c.1706-1776), died in February 1776, at Crabbottom, Augusta County (now Highland Co.), Virginia. The Will of Peter Thomas HULL was translated from the German Tongue by John William LEE and recorded, 19 Mar 1776, in Will Book 5, page 407, Augusta County, VA. It reads as follows: "In the name of God Amen: The twenty-eighth day of November, one Thousand seven hundred and seventy-five. I, Peter Thomas HOHL, of August County and Colony of Virginia, being sick in body but sound of mind and memory, thanks be to Almighty God for the same, do make and declare this my last will and Testament, in manner and form following, first to my dearly beloved wife, Susannah Margaret, I give and bequeath the third part of the estate, after all my just debts are paid and my Eldest son Peter shall according to my will and desire after my decease give unto his (step) Mother the third part or share of the increase of Grain to the land produces and shall bring the same into the Barn and Thresh it for her. I likewise bequeath further unto my wife to have choice of two milk cows and the Pennsylvania Mare also a horse for her to ride and to work, which horse is to remain upon the plantation and not to be disposed of, likewise the choice of two sheep; the division of my land shall be in the following manner: "(1st) the land be surveyed from the lower end on the line up to the Dry Run. (2nd) from the Dry Run up to the corner tree. (3rd) from the corner tree on up to the Middle Corner tree on the upper land. (4th) from the Middle Corner Tree on up to the upper Corner Tree. (5th) The three of my eldest daughters shall be made equal. I bequeath unto them after my decease the sum of Twenty Pounds Current money each, and my youngest daughters shall also receive, each of them the sum of Twenty pounds Current Money, as soon as they shall attain their age. (6th) I also desire that the tree different pieces or parcels of land, viz., the first at the upper trace, the second in the (Vanderpool) Gap, third on Jackson's River, besides an entering, shall be sold at Public Vendue, and put to the estate. I empower hereby my eldest son, Peter, to sell and dispose of the same as my executor to this my last Will and Testament and desire that Susannah Margaret, my wife and my son Peter shall educate my younger Children, in a Christian-like manner, as long as they behave dutiful; otherwise they shall have power to bind them out with this proviso to pay them interest on their money from the day they are bound out." Signed by the mark of Peter HOHL. Witnessed by Bernard LANTZ, Leonard SIMON, and Peter FLESHER. Will recorded 19 Mar 1776, Augusta Co., Va. Will Book 5, p.407. See also: D.A.R. Patriot Index; D.A.R. #436200; A ROSTER OF REVOLUTIONARY ANCESTORS OF THE INDIANA DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION v.2, p.171.
  • 1776 - D.A.R. Revolutionary Patriots include: Abraham BIRD, b.1755, d.5/3/1821, m. Mary JONES. Amos BIRD, b.1737, d.6/5/1818, m. Sarah RUDDELL. Andrew BIRD, b.11/30/1754, d.11/30/1838, m. Ann ----, Cpt. VA. Henry BIRD, b.1764, d.9/4/1858, m. Nancy Baldwin, Pvt. VA. Pension #S.30307, Blwt. 28609-160-55. John BIRD, bpt.12/13/1743, d.1840, m. Sarah ---. William BIRD, b.1763, d.1847, m. Martha ----, Pvt. NC and VA.
  • 1776 - Richard BIRD, birth and resident of King and Queen County, Va., served in Capt. Nathaniel WELCH's company, Col. William BRENT's 2nd Regiment. See VIRGINIA MAGAZINE , v.5,p.352.
  • 1776 - A John BYRD enlisted, 9 Mar 1776, and served as a private in Capt. Jonathan CLARK's company, Col. Muhlenberg's Virginia regiment, was at the battles of Brandywine and Germantown. He was allowed pension on his application executed, 30 Mar 1819, at which time he was aged about sixty years. He resided then in Bourbon County, Kentucky. Sometime before March 1823, the soldier moved from Kentucky to Fayette County, Indiana where he died about the year 1829 or 1830. This John BYRD married in 1780, Elinor ---. Her age in 1823 was given as 57 years. In 1823, the soldier and his wife had only one child, aged twenty years, living at home with them; the name of said child was not stated, nor the names of any other children given. A daughter of the soldier had married after the family moved to Indiana, date of her marriage and the name of her husband were not shown; however, the marriage took place before Oct 1823. In 1840, Elinor BYRD, the soldier's widow was living in Indiana. National Archives Pension File S35807.
  • 1776 - Adam RADER married, 2 Apr 1776, in Rockingham Co., Va. to Clara, daughter of Cornelius RUDDELL. It was the 6th wedding in the Linville Creek Baptist Church. Wayland, John W., VIRGINIA VALLEY RECORDS
  • 1776 - Colonel Abraham BIRD was in Woodstock, Dunmore Co., VA in 1776. See Chalkey's CHRONICLES OF SCOTCH-IRISH SETTLEMENT OF VA. 1745-1800 .
  • 1776 - Even PHILLIPS and Elizabeth DEVER were married, 23 April 1776, at Rockingham County, Virginia. (Note: Two children of John and Susanna BIRD married DEVERs.) Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.15, p.13..
  • 1776 - David RADER and Ruth HENTON were married, 4 June 1776, Greenbrier Co., Virginia.
  • 1776 - Adam CURRY was a soldier in the Revolution. Soon after the war he located in the Back Creek valley in what is now Highland Co., Va. He supposedly lived to be 105 years old. He was the father of Susan (CURRY) RIDER who married, 12 Feb 1796, John RIDER (1773-1855). "One of the best known characters in West Highland, Virginia was Captain Adam CURRY, a Revolutionary veteran. One of his grandsons, William CURRY, is a well known citizen of Pocahontas County. Captain CURRY was a native of Scotland, and came to America, and resided several years near Manasses Junction. He was among the first to enlist in the war of the Revolution, and was chosen captain of his company, and participated in all the engagements in which Virginia troops were engaged that followed MERCER and WASHINGTON. Soon after the war he gathered up the remnants of his property and moved to Augusta County, locating in the Back Creek valley on property now (1901) owned by William CRUMMETT in southwest Highland. He settled in the woods and raised a large family of sons and daughters. He was honest in his dealings, and was held in much esteem for his high sense of honor and patriotic impulses. It seems almost too strange to be believed that he would not accept a pension offered him for his services as a brave and faithful officer in the Revolutionary struggle. He always declared that the service was his own reward. Instead of being a hardship, military service was the greatest pleasure of his life. He desired no better recompense than the fun he had, and the pleasure it gave him to see liberty secured for his invaded country. He was proverbially neat in dress and polished in his manners. To the close of his life, he dressed in the colonial style -- knee breeches, long stockings, and shoes with silver buckles. He retained his habits of court life as to diet and sleeping as long as he lived. He died at the age of one hundred and five years, with but few signs of decrepitude visible. To the last he was erect as a young grenadier, cheerful in spirit, and mental faculties active apparently as ever. His remains are in the Matheny grave yard, near the Rehobeth Church, in the Back Valley, a few miles from his home." Price, William T. HISTORY OF POCAHONTAS COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA (1901), pp.311-315.
  • 1776 - William Bryan and Robert Rose in their A HISTORY OF PIONEER FAMILIES IN MISSOURI , p.324, give an account of some descendants of Samuel DYER, born in Bristol England; officer in the American Revolution; settled in Albemarle county, Va.; and married Celia BRICKLEY.
  • 1777 - Richard BIRD and Mary PAMPLIN were married, 12 June 1777, Middlesex Co., Virginia.
  • 1777 - A list of names of persons who sold land in Rockingham County, Virginia, from 1777 to 1793 includes the following: Charles CALAHAN William CHESTNUT; James DYER Peter CONRAD; William DEVER Edward ERVIN; Nicholas FOGLE Isaac GUM; Thomas HARRISON John JORDAN; John MILLER Cornelius RUDDELL; John Walter Wayland, THE GERMAN ELEMENT of the SHENANDOAH VALLEY of VIRGINIA (1907 - reprinted 1978), pp.220-221.
  • 1777 - Reuben RIDER enlisted in 1777 in the 12th Virginia Regiment commanded by Col. James WOOD and served in Capt. Jonathan LANGDON's Company. In 1833 while living in Wilson Co., Tennessee at age 79 years he applied for pension. He states he was born 15 Dec 1754 in Shenandoah Co., Virginia. He moved to East Tennessee (then North Carolina) on the Big Pigeon River about 1780. Reuben RIDER married, 4 May 1815, to Martha LEACH in Wilson Co., Tenn. He died, 29 July 1838. A transcript of bible records in his pension papers shows children: Rebecca Ann RIDER born 22 July 1816; Sophia B. RIDER born 18 Jan 1819; Sarah E. RIDER born 1821; Martha H. RIDER born 12 Aug 1822; Amanda J. RIDER born 11 Oct 1824. See National Archives Pension File # W2572, BLWt. 28530-160-55.
  • 1777 - Adam RIDER was a Private in the 11th and 12th Regiment Virginia Continental Line. He also is listed as militia man paid at Pittsburg 1775 and one of Morgan's riflemen. Pension File # S40341. Anthony RIDER, b. 174?, was Captain of Rockingham County, Virginia Militia 20 Aug 1777. On 20 August 1777, a list of the tithables was ordered taken in the various military companies of Augusta County. Including those companies enumerated were Anthony RIDER's, Capt. Ralph STEWART's Capt. Reuben HARRISON's, and Capt. Robert CRAVEN's. On 25 May 1778, "Anthony RYDER, being appointed Captain of the Militia took the Oath according to Law." J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.298; John Walter Wayland, THE GERMAN ELEMENT of the SHENANDOAH VALLEY of VIRGINIA (1907 - reprinted 1978), p.136. Matthias RIDER or RADER and Major Michael RADER served in the Revolution from Virginia. John RYDER (1756-1830) served as a Private soldier from Virginia. He married Elizabeth BRADLEY. See D.A.R. PATRIOT INDEX ; Pension File #S21947.
  • 1777 - Revolutionary War Pensioners included the following: STUART, Charles Va. R10148; STUART, Edward Va. W6170, wife Mary; STUART, John Va. S19474; STUART, Charles Pa. S23948; STUART, John Va. R10157; STEWART, Alexander Va. W8763, wife Dorothy; STEWART, Benjamin Va. W6162, wife Dorothy; STEWART, Charles Va. R10149; STEWART, Charles Va. S33736; STEWARD, Christopher Pa. W6169, wife Elizabeth.
  • 1778 - James STEWART, son of William and Margaret (USHER) STEUART, was born, 2 Jan 1757, in then Augusta Co. (Later Bath Co., Va.). He enlisted as a Private in the Virginia Militia and served under Captains Andrew LOCKRIDGE, Thomas HICKLIN, and Peter HULL at Clover Lick Fort, Warwick's Fort, and the battle at Jamestown. Pension #S6159; Oren F. Morton, A HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA (1911 - reprinted 1979), p.193. Edward STUART, son of William and Margaret (USHER) STEUART enlisted in 1778 with the Virginia Troops and served under Captain Andrew LOCKRIDGE at Vances' Fort, under Capt. Robert McKERY at Clover Lick, under Capt. John McCOY near Richmond, as an ensign in Capt. George POAGE's co., and under Capt. Thomas HICKLIN in Col. Samuel VANCE's Regiment was at the siege of Yorktown and was one of the guard that marched the British prisoners to Winchester, Virginia in 1782. He was allowed pension on his application of, 8 Jan 1833, while a resident of Bath Co., Va. By 1837, he had moved to Harrison Co., Va. He died, 7 Apr 1844, at his residence on Elk Creek, Barbour Co., Va. (now West Virginia). He married, 4 Apr. 1786, to Mary CALLIHAN or CALAGHAN. See Pension File #W6170; Oren F. Morton, A HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA (1911 - reprinted 1979), p.193. John STEUART served in Capt. Thos. HICKLIN's company and received a sword wound in the hand at Yorktown, 1778. William STEUART was a soldier in the American Revolution. Oren F. Morton, A HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA (1911 - reprinted 1979), p.193. Note: For information on the Militia units of Augusta County mentioned in the above pension Papers see VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE , v.30,p.399.
  • 1778 - Justices commissioned in Rockingham County, 27 April 1778, included James DYER, William McDOWELL, and Anthony RYDER. J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), pp.238-239.
  • 1778 - James DYER married, before 1778, to Phoebe HARRISON, eldest daughter of Zebulon and Margaret (CRAVENS) HARRISON. James DYER was one of the justices of Rockingham court. J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.362.
  • 1778 - John CRAVENS died, 24 July 1778; and Margaret (HIATT), widow of William DYER and John CRAVENS, married third, 1782, to Dennis LANAHAN. J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.342.
  • 1778 - Justices, appointed by Patrick HENRY, and commissioned in Rockingham County, 22 September 1778, included James DYER, William McDOWELL, Anthony RYDER, Gawen HAMILTON, and Reuben HARRISON.. J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.238,309,321,362.
  • 1778 - Frederick KEISTER served in the American Revolution and qualified as a Lieutenant, 28 September 1778. J. T. McAllister, VIRGINIA IN THE REVOLUTION , p.230; Chalkey, Lyman, RECORDS OF AUGUSTA COUNTY, VIRGINIA , v.1,p.97, v.2,p.364; McAllister, VIRGINIA IN THE REVOLUTION , p.230; N.S.D.A.R. Natl.#627942 (Mertle DECOURSEY).
  • 1778 - The will of a James DEVOOR (DEAVER) of Yohogania County, Virginia; dated 14 November 1778, was attested by Nicholas DEPUE, Tobias DECKER and Daniel DEPUE, Jr.; and proved March 1779. Beneficiaries were children: Jacob, Andrew, Henry, John, Sarah PEARSHAL, Samuel; children under age: David, Moses, Catharine, Francis, James. All his real estate, except the Ferry ("on Monongahela River, from his house over the river to the Mouth of Pidgeon Creek") went to sons David and Moses; however, the court later allotted one third of the Landed Estate to James DEVOIR's widow or Relict, Elizabeth DEVOIR. John DEVOIR was executor of the will. It is likely that the minor child, James DEVOOR, mentioned in this will was the James DEVER who married, 10 Sep 1794, at Bath County, Virginia to Catharine BIRD, dau. of John and Susannah BIRD. Boyd Crumrine, VIRGINIA COURT RECORDS IN SOUTHWESTERN PENNSYLVANIA , (1974 Reprint), II, 301,346,395,396, III, p.327, I, 526,531.
  • 1778 - Islam CHAFFIN and Betsy BIRD were married, (bond) 18 Dec. 1778, at Prince Edward Co., Virginia. v
  • 1779 - On 26 Aug 1779, John BORT and wife purchased 23 acres on the south side of Mill Creek from Henry KELKNER and Barbara, his wife. On the same date, John BORT purchased 100 acres on the south side of Mill Creek from Jacob SHEFFER. (Mill Creek was at the present site of Mt. Jackson, Shenandoah County, VA.) - From Moneka Landreth of DeKalb, Ill. (1981). This German BORDT/BIRD/BIRD family appears to have been contemporaries with our John BIRD of Augusta, and seems to have married in to some of the same families associated with our BIRD and HULL families.
  • 1779 - The muster roll of Captain Peter HULL's Company, Second Battalion, Augusta Militia, 1779, includes the names of privates Adam ARBOGAST, Abraham BURNER, and John YEAGER. Morton, Oren F., HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.194.
  • 1780c- George HULL, born 15 Oct 1757, died 1852, married, about 1780, to Hannah, dau. of Frederick and Hannah (DYER) KIESTER. He was a Pvt. Spy in the Revolutionary War. Cleek, Geo. W., EARLY WESTERN AUGUSTA PIONEERS , pp.385-386; D.A.R. Patriot Index; National Archives Pension file #S13317.
  • 1780 - On 16 August 1780, there was recorded the vendue bill of Peter HOLE's estate. Various articles were sold to Peter HOLE, Paul SUMMERS, Neckless HARPER, William DUNWIDDY, George HOLE, Henry FLETCHER, Joseph HAM, John FERIS, William McALLY, Bernard LANCE, Enees HOLE, Elias PAINTER, George COWGER, Captain PARSONS, Leonard SUMMONS, Peter SEGERFEET, Mike MANNEN, Widow GREGORY, Roger PATTON, Leasy HOLE, James and Thomas PARSONS, Conrad LANCE and Miss HOLE. The estate was settled by Peter HOLE, the executor, 16 August 1780. - Records, Augusta County, VA, v.III, p.158; Will Book 6, p.147, Staunton, VA.
  • 1780 - Morton says that John BIRD came from Germany and settled, ca.1780, at Big Back Creek Valley near Valley Center. Morton, Oren F., HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA , pp.195, 264-267, 240, 250, 354-355.
  • 1780 - William CURRY (ca.1715-1791) furnished bacon, 16 pounds, to the Patriot forces at Botetourt Co., Virginia, 14 September 1780. A ROSTER OF REVOLUTIONARY ANCESTORS of the INDIANA DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION , v.2, p.84; D.A.R. #369748.
  • 1780s- From Willard Jillson's OLD KENTUCKY DEEDS AND ENTRIES : Lincoln County entries: Col. Abraham BIRD, Bk.2,p.17, 7-7-1783, Kentucky River Moses BIRD Bk.1,p.49, 5-24-1780, Otter Creek Jefferson Co. Entries: Abraham BIRD BK.A,p.376, 8-9-1784; Moses BIRD Bk.A,p.95, 5-24-1783. Military Warrants: Joshua BIRD Virginia Line 12-21-1784; Thomas BIRD Virginia Line 12-9-1783; Thomas BIRD Virginia Line; Rueben BIRD Virginia Line; Richard BIRD Virginia Line
  • 1780 - James DYER, son of Roger and Hannah (BRITTON??) DYER [not Dyer, it's GREEN], married second, 13 Oct. 1780, to Jane RALSTON, at Rockingham Co., Virginia. Harry M. Strickler, OLD TENTH LEGION, ROCKINGHAM COUNTY, VA. MARRIAGES , p.49.
  • 1780 - Thomas BIRD and Margaret TOLBERT were married, 19 Oct. 1780, at Rockingham Co., Virginia. Minister returns at Rockingham and Greenbrier counties. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.6, p.4.
  • 1780 - Morton says that William RIDER (1730c.-1819c.) settled in Big Back Creek Valley near Valley Center about 1780. He was a neighbor of John BIRD at Back Creek. William RIDER migrated from Maryland to what is now Highland Co., Va. about 1780. He is buried in the Matheny grave yard in Back Creek Valley. Morton, Oren F., HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA , pp.252,330-331; Rider, Fremont RIDER/RYDER GENEALOGY (1958).
  • 1781 - Nathaniel MOTHERSHEAD and Ruthey BIRT were married, 1781, at Orange Co., Virginia. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.18, p.14.
  • 1781 - Valentine BIRD received from Thomas DENISON, 12 Jan 1781, a patent for 205 acres located on the east branch of Back Creek called the Valley Branch in present Bath County, Virginia. This land was deeded, in 1813, to John BIRD, Sr. Bath County Deed Bk.4, p.373.
  • 1781 - David H. BIRD, son of John and Margaret Susanna (WINTROW) BIRD, was born, 23 Mar 1781, in Augusta Co., VA. Ref: LDS Index Card to Idaho Falls Temple Records No. 99979.
  • 1781 - Among the officers serving under Colonels Robert McCREERY and Sampson MATHEWS at the battle of Green Spring, near Jamestown, 6 July 1781, were Captains Peter HULL ????, David GWIN, Thomas HICKLIN, William KINCAID, John BROWN, Lieutenant Joseph GWIN, and Ensigns Alexander and Thomas WRIGHT. Morton, Oren F., ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.96.
  • 1781 - Conrad RADER enlisted at Rockingham (Shenandoah) Co., Virginia in Aug 1781, and served two months under Capt. SHARP, Col. EDMUNDS, and General STEVENs around Yorktown and Williamsburg. He became a substitute for John MILLER of Shenandoah, and served two months under Capt. DOWNIE, Col. NISWONGER, stationed at Winchester barracks. In Jan 1782 he was drafted in the militia from Shenandoah Co., Virginia and served under Capt. WHITE, of Loudoun County, Col. NISWONGER, of Winchester. The soldier was born near Bethlehem, Penna. about 1765. His parents removed to Loudoun Co., Va. when he was 4 years old; resided there 11 years, then went to Shenandoah County. He was granted pension certificate #12006 in March 1833. - Pension File S5973.
  • 1781 - Charles STEWART was issued a certificate to 400 acres of land in Monongalia County, Va. (Later Harrison Co.) on that branch of the West Fork called Buffalo about 3 miles from Richard's Fort (near the mouth of Sycamore Creek, six miles from Clarksburg) to include his settlement of 1771. William STEWART, assignee to James WORKMAN, 400 acres on Little Kanawha to include an improvement made in 1776. - Harrison County Deeds.
  • 1782 - The 1782 Census of Back Creek, Bath Co., Virginia lists: Alexander STUART - 8 horses, 23 cattle. He was a neighbor of John BYRD and William RIDER.
  • 1782 - Frederick KEISTER is listed as furnishing supplies in an account dated, 29 May 1782. Wayland, John W., HISTORY OF ROCKINGHAM COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.101.
  • 1782 - Peter HOAL received grant of 341 acres at Crab Apple Bottom, Augusta Co., Va. in 1782. Bk.1,p.537.
  • 1782 - Richard Curry, an Irishman, settled about 1782 in Back Creen Valley near the Bath Line. He was a soldier of the American Revolution. Morton, Oren F., HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA , pp.193,250,277-278.
  • 1782 - The 1782 tax list of Bath County, Virginia, Back Creek lists John BYRD with 17 horses, 15 cattle. Also listed was William RIDER with 4 houses, 5 cattle. This William RIDER migrated from Maryland to what is now Highland Co., Virginia about 1780. He died in 1819 and is buried in Matheny Grave Yard in Back Creek, Virginia.
  • 1782 - Isaac Anglin and Nancy DIER were married, 9 May 1782, at Rockingham Co., Virginia. Minister returns in both Rockingham and Greenbrier counties. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.5, p.1 & v.6, p.1.
  • 1782 - Alexander BADGER and Margaret BIRD were married, 17 July 1782, at Augusta Co., Virginia. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.5, p.2.
  • 1782 - John CURRY and Isabella ELLISON were married, 26 Nov. 1782, at Rockingham Co., Virginia. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.14, p.4.
  • 1782 - The following marriages took place at Pittsylvania Co., Virginia: James DALTON and Agness DYER, 18 April 1782. John ATKINS and Winney DYER, 26 Oct. 1786. John DYER, Jr. and Viney MORTON, 9 July 1787. Nathan DYER and Nancy DALTON, 1788. Thomas BALL and Elender DYER, 8 March 1791. Nathan DYER and Mary PAYNE, 15 Feb. 1793. George BROCK and Amey DYER, 13 Nov. 1795. William DYER and Nancy WARD, 11 Oct. 1796. Robert HENRY and Peggy DYER, 22 Feb. 1799. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 .
  • 1783 - Peter HULL, son of George and Hannah (KIESTER) HULL, ????? was born 11 Jan 1783. He married, 10 Sept. 1816, to Rachel TALLMAN, and he died, 23 Sept. 1854, at McDowell, Highland Co., Virginia.
  • 1783 - A record in Richmond, VA shows that John Bird received certificate #L18914S10D on March 8, 1783, for the balance of his full pay, agreeable to the act of the General Assembly, passed in the November 1781 session. The State Treasurer paid the sum to one William REYNOLDS for BIRD's account.
  • 1783 - John BIRD paid taxes on land in what is now Greene Co., VA in 1783.
  • 1784 - William RIDER married, 16 Jan 1784, to Jane JONES in Augusta Co., Virginia.
  • 1784 - John YEAGER, Sr., born 5 October 1762, near Lancaster Co., Penna., died 7 Jan 1833, Pocahantas Co., Virginia, married, ca.1784, at Crabbottom, Virginia to Phoebe Anastasia HULL, born 15 April 1768, daughter of Peter Thomas and Susanna (DIEFFENBACH) HULL. They had children: Jacob YEAGER (1790-1861), m.1812, Sarah Ann HEDY; Sara Ann (1793-1882), m. (1st) Ferdinand STALNAKER; Elizabeth YEAGER married, 23 May 1816, Jacob BIRD, son of Jacob; John; Andrew YEAGER (1800-1861) married Elizabeth DILLEY; Phoebe Hull YEAGER married Samuel BRADY; Susanna YEAGER, m.1828, Moses ARBOGAST; Rachel YEAGER (1808-1872), m.1833, Henry HARPER; Mary "Polly" YEAGER, m.1828, George M. MAY. A ROSTER OF REVOLUTIONARY ANCESTORS OF THE INDIANA DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION , v.1, p.675; D.A.R. #582973.
  • 1784 - Elizabeth HULL (1784c.-1852), dau. of George and Hannah (KIESTER) HULL, was born in or near Pendleton Co., VA. She married, 30 Aug 1806, to David BIRD, and died 18 July 1852.
  • 1784 - John BIRT is listed on the census (Alexander Hite's List) of Shenandoah Co., VA in 1784 with 6 whites in household. He was a neighbor of Abraham BIRD and Mounce BIRD. Ref: First Census of the United States - Virginia.
  • 1784 - James MOFFETT married, 29 Dec 1784, in Augusta Co., Virginia, to Mary STUART.
  • 1785 - There was a Peter HALLE listed as a tithable in Warren County, Va. (fork district) in 1785.
  • 1785 - James CURRY and Dennis LANAHAN owned a lot in Harrisonburg, Virginia in 1785. "Dennis LANAHAN was the third husband of Margaret, nee HIATT, who married first, William DYER, and second, John CRAVENS, son of Robert CRAVENS, Sr." J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.247; From John Walter Wayland's "The Germans of the Valley," THE VIRGINIA MAGAZINE , v.X, p.45.
  • 1785 - William ERWIN married, 7 July 1785, in Augusta Co., Virginia, to Susannah CURRY.
  • 1785 - Benjamin CAFFEE and Margaret DYER were married, 8 Sept. ??? who is this Margaret Dyer? 1785, at Montgomery County, Virginia.
  • 1785 - James BELL married, 15 Sept. 1785, in Augusta Co., Virginia, to Margaret CURRY.
  • 1785 - Jesse HARRISON married, 1785, to Sarah CURRY, daughter of John CURRY. Witness was David ROLSTON. J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), pp.314-317.
  • 1785 - The following marriages took place at Pittsylvania Co., Virginia: Isaac CURRY and Rhoda GRISHAM, 24 March 1785. Nathan CURRY and Nancy GRISHAM, 9 Dec. 1790. Israel CURRY and Sally PAYNE, 19 Jan. 1795. Barth CURRY and Rozana NUCKOLS, 11 Feb. 1796. Thomas CURREY and Peggy HANKINS, 16 May 1798. Thomas CURRY and Nancy CRANE, 13 NOv. 1802. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.1.
  • 1786 - William J. RYDER married, 21 Feb 1786, to Mary BRISCO in Augusta Co., Virginia. Mary BRISCOE was possibly daughter of Isaac BRISCOE, who had served as Washington's bodyguard at Yorktown. "The Rev. William J. RYDER is remembered as a man of high character and sterling qualities." Oren F. Morton, A HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA (1979), p.224.
  • 1786 - Isaiah SLAVEN married, 22 Feb 1786, in Augusta Co., Virginia to Patty STUART.
  • 1786 - Isiah STEWART and Martha STEWART were married, 1786, at Bath Co., Virginia. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.14, p.17.
  • 1786 - James CURRY and Mary ERWIN were married, 27 March 1786, at Augusta County, Virginia.
  • 1786 - Edward STUART (1759-1844), son of William and Margaret (USHER) STEUART, married 4 Apr 1786, to Mary CALAGHAN, dau. of Charles CALLAHAN. On the same day, Alexander WELLS married Margaret CALAGHAN, dau. of Charles. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.1 & v.2.
  • 1786 - On 12 Sept. 1786, a Barbara BOID was one of the sponsors for a dau. born to Jacob ROSCH and wife, Anna in ZION Church, Hamburg, Shenandoah Co., VA.
  • 1786 - Archibald METHENY and Jean CURRY were married, 13 December 1786, at Frederick Co., Virginia. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.17, p.16.
  • 1787 - William DYE ??? and Frances ASHBY were married, 1787, at Princess Anne County, Virginia. Henry SHARWOOD and Rhoda DYER were married, 1787, at Princess Anne County.
  • 1787 - Pendleton County, Virginia was formed from parts of Rockingham, Augusta and Hardy Counties in 1787.
  • 1787 - George CURRY married, 22 Feb 1787, in Augusta Co., Virginia, to Agnes HAMILTON of Rockbridge County.
  • 1787 - James CURRY bought, in 1787, 175 acres on the Bull Pasture River, from John BLACK, son of Samuel BLACK. Oren F. Morton ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.32.
  • 1787 - Robert CURRY and Phebe SAMPLE were married, 1787, at Rockingham Co., Virginia. Bondsman was Jesse HARRISON. Robert SAMPLE consented; witnesses were Jesse HARRISON and Moses SAMPLES. Harry M. Strickler, OLD TENTH LEGION, ROCKINGHAM CO., VA. MARRIAGES , p.43.
  • 1787 - John STEWART, son of William and Margaret (USHER) STEUART, married, 31 May 1787, in Augusta Co., Va. to Hannah HICKLIN. He died, 1850, and is buried in Montgomery County, Missouri. They had children: James; John (1795-1873) m. Mary STEWART; Edward; Jacob; Miranda; David; Margaret (1822-1898) md. John SEE; Nancy; and Jennie.
  • 1787 - James McGLAUGHLIN and Mary STUART were married, 7 June 1787, at Augusta Co., Virginia.
  • 1787 - Alexander BADGER married, 17 Jul 1787, Margaret BIRD in Augusta Co., VA.
  • 1787 - On 12 Apr 1787, Abraham BIRD acquired 89 acres between Smith's Creek and Massanutten Mountain in Rockingham Co., VA.
  • 1787 - James BIRD and Fanny MASON were married, 3 Sept. 1787, at Franklin County, Virginia. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.25, p.3.
  • 1787 - Peter HOLE received a grant for 97 acres of land on Riffles Old Road, Augusta County, Virginia in 1787. Bk.1,p.202.
  • 1788 - Peter HULL, Sr. ??? was appointed Justice of Pendleton County, Virginia in 1788.
  • 1788 - Peter HULL, in 1788, took a storekeeper's license in Pendleton Co., Virginia. Morton, Oren F., HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.110.
  • 1788 - A military voucher for Capt. Josiah HARRISON's Company #9 in Rockingham County, Virginia, in 1788 includes: Andrew BIRD, 1 tithable Andrew BIRD, Sr., 1 tithable, 4 slaves, 9 horses David RADER, above 16 "having 1 creature" Adam RADER, 1 tithable, 3 slaves, 10 horses. Anthony READER, son John Mathias READER, son George
  • 1788 - Otho WADE, born 1766, married 1788, to Catherine CALLAHAN, daughter of Charles CALLAHAN of Augusta Co., Va. Otho WADE was the son of John WADE (1723-1815) of Highland Co., Va and Sophia (HOWARD) WADE (1727-1816) of Red Stone, Md. See: Virkus ABRIDGED COMPENDIUM OF AMERICAN GENEALOGY v. ,p.604.
  • 1788 - James USHER married, 1788, at Augusta County, Virginia, to Catherine WHITESIDES.
  • 1788 - George WRIGHT married, 18 Mar 1788, to Mary CURRY in Augusta Co., Virginia.
  • 1788 - On 13 April 1778, a number of inhabitants of Cowpasture, Calfpasture, Bullpasture, Jackson River, and Back Creek petitioned the Virginia Assembly for a new county to be struck off from Augusta. The signers of this petition included: Robert, William, John, and Andey LOUGHRIDGE, William GIVEN, George FRANCISCO, Lofty PULLIN, Lofty PULLIN, Jr., Hugh, John and James HICKLIN, William, James and Edward STUART, William JORDAN, John BEARD (BIRD?), et.al. Morton, Oren F., ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.106.
  • 1788 - Robert CURRY and Martha KENEDY were married, 15 April 1788, at Augusta Co., Virginia. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.16.
  • 1788 - Hannah, dau. of Heinerich BORT and wife Eva ROSINA was born 30 May 1788, and baptized 7 Sept. 1788 in the Zion Church of Hamburg, Shenandoah Co., VA. Sponsors were Johannes BORT and wife Catharina. - From Mrs. Charles Landreth of DeKalb, Illinois (1981).
  • 1788 - John McDOWELL and Sarah WITHROW were married, 16 Aug. 1788, at Augusta Co., Virginia.
  • 1788 - Daniel MARTHENA (MATHENY?) and Sarah CURRY were married, 14 Oct. 1788, at Frederick Co., Virginia. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.24, p.19.
  • 1788 - James CURRY married, 28 Oct 1788, in Augusta Co., Virginia, to Margaret FRANCIS. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.6, p.6.
  • 1788 - The estate of William CHESTNUT was appraised by John BIRD on 18 Dec 1788, in Augusta County, VA. Will Book No.VII, p.155,184.
  • 1788 - John McCLUNG married, 12 Nov 1788, to Mary STUART, daughter of Benjamin STUART, at Augusta Co., Virginia.
  • 1789 - Peter BERT and Hannah SHAFER or SHAVER made marriage bond in Shenandoah Co., VA, 24 Jan 1789. A letter of consent is attached by Hannah's father, Jacob SHAFFER, in which he gives her permission to marry "Petter BIRD." The official filling of the bond spelled Peter's name, clearly, as Peter BIRT and his bondsman as John BIRT. Yet Ashby, in her book on marriage records for Shenandoah County and the Virginia State Library and Archives have Peter's and Hannah's bond indexed under BERT. John BIRT signed with his "x", but Peter wrote his signature in poorly-formed German Script, spelling it as "BORDT." Miss Grace SHOWALTER, Librarian and archivist of Menno Simons Historical Library, Harrisonburg, VA, deciphered Peter's signature as "BORDT". She had others check the signature. "All agree he spelled his name "BORDT" and feel as poorly as he wrote, it was probably the only thing that he could write, and that he did not write it often." - From Mrs. Charles Landreth of DeKalb, Ill (1981).
  • 1789 - Robert and John CURRY taxed on 350 acres of land in 1789. List by Ralph LOFTUS, Commissioner. Robert CURRY signed the petition to build a tobacco warehouse in Harrisonburg, Virginia. A voucher in Capt. John Herdman's co. for John & Robert CURRY, 11 horses. In Robert Harrison's company #5, James CURRY, 1 horse. VIRGINIA VALLEY RECORDS , p.42,99,102,136,157.
  • 1789 - On 22 June 1789, James CURRY, Benjamin HARRISON, Brewer REEVES, and Thomas SCOTT, as trustees of the Presbyterian Church of Harrisonburg, Virginia, were granted liberty by the Circuit Court of Rockingham to build a house for public worship. The deed for the lot, on East Market Street, was made out to the above trustees, 25 September 1792 by Charles McCLAIN. J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.321.
  • 1789 - Rockingham Co., Virginia landowners in 1789 include: David RADER, Michael READER, Anthony READER, Adam READER, Mathias READER, Abraham BIRD, and Andrew BIRD. Raymond A. Lee of Athens, Ohio wrote in 1974: "My G-G-G-Grandfather, Michael RADER was born in Rockingham County, Virginia. --- Apparently the first of the family emigrated from Germany (they spelled the name ROEDER) about 1660. They settled in Lehigh County, Penna., and later some of them moved to Rockingham county, Va., where they operated a lead mine. --- I do know that Michael and at least part of his family came to what is now Greenbrier County, West Virginia before 1800 along with other RADER families."
  • 1789 - Charles CALLAHAN purchased, in 1789, from John MILLER of Rockingham, 220 acres of land on the Bullpasture River, one mile south of McDowell, Highland Co. (earlier Bath County), Virginia. Oren F. Morton ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.29.
  • 1789 - John CLARK and Nancy BYRD were married, 17 Aug. 1789, at Caroline Co., Virginia.
  • 1789 - James BIRD and Sarah HATHCOCK were married, 30 Aug. 1789, at Southampton Co., Virginia.
  • 1789 - Rockingham Co., Virginia landowners in 1789 include: David RADER, Michael READER, Anthony READER, Adam READER, Mathias READER, Abraham BIRD, and Andrew BIRD.
  • 1789 - In the Virginia State Legislature Sessions of 1789-95, Colonel Peter HULL represented the portion of Pendleton Co. that later was Highland County. ???
  • 1789 - James MOFFETT and Mary STUART were married, 29 December 1789, at Augusta Co., Virginia. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.5, p.10.
  • 1789 - The following marriages were performed in Pittsylvania Co., Virginia: Daniel CALLAHAN and Wilmoth RUSSELL, 22 Aug 1787. Francis SHAW and Nancy STEWART, 8 May 1789. Philip RUSSELL and Elizabeth STEWART, 6 Jan. 1792. Richard RUSSELL and Isabel STUART, 1794.
  • 1790 - Census of Strasburg, Lancaster County, Penna. for 1790, p.145 lists Peter HOLL with 3 white males over 16 and 2 white females.
  • 1790 - The 1790 York County, Penna census lists: John Jacob WINTERODE, Adam WINDERODE
  • 1790 - Braxton BIRD and Mary PRICE were married, 13 July 1790, at Middlesex Co., Virginia.
  • 1790 - Edward HALL married, 22 Jul 1790, in Augusta Co. to Polly STUART.
  • 1790 - Joseph BYRD and Nettie JACKSON were married, 20 Aug. 1790, at Charlotte Co., Virginia.
  • 1790 - Census of Virginia, p.40, Pittsylvania lists John BIRD with 8 whites in household.
  • 1790 - On 1 September 1790, Balser BUMGARNER of Augusta Co., Virginia, buys of Francis ERWIN, atty for Alex. CURRY of the District of Kentucky, two tracts of land in Augusta County: one of 40 acres, the other of 130 acres, both on or near a branch of Naken Creek. John Walter Wayland, THE GERMAN ELEMENT of the SHENANDOAH VALLEY of VIRGINIA (1907 - reprinted 1978), p.82.
  • 1790 - The 1790 Census of Virginia lists Ann CURRY, age 53 (presumably a widow). - Info from Mavis SMITH of Fremont, CA.
  • 1790 - James CURRY, William HERRING, Benjamin HARRISON, Reuben HARRISON, and William CRAVENS were among the jurors of Rockingham County, Virginia. J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.352.
  • 1790 - James HICKLIN and Jane STUART were married, 28 Dec. 1790, at Augusta Co., Virginia.
  • 1791 - George WOOD married, 20 Jan 1791, in Augusta Co. (Rockbridge Co.), Virginia, to Jennie CURRY. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.17, p.20.
  • 1791 - Abner BIRD and Jane JAMISON were married, 7 March 1791, at Franklin Co., Virginia.
  • 1791 - Charles CALLAHAN, son of Charles CALLAHAN, married 1791, to Mary STEUART, dau. of William and Margaret (USHER) STEUART. Morton, Oren F., HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.379.
  • 1791 - Clements GRAHAM married, 1791, at Bath County, Virginia, to Jean USHER, daughter of Robert USHER.
  • 1791 - Gershem CLEMENTS and Jenny USHER were married, 22 April 1791, at Augusta Co., Virginia. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.2, p.4 & v.4, p.5.
  • 1791 - Bath County, Virginia was formed out of Augusta County in 1790. The first session of the county court of Bath convened 10 May 1791, at the home of the widow of Capt. John LEWIS. The justices present on the opening day were John BOLLAR, John DEAN, Johan and William POAGE, Samuel VANCE and John WILSON. The first attorneys were John COTTON, James REID and Archibald STUART. Members of the first grand jury in Bath County were Joseph MAYSE, Samuel BLACK, Thomas BROCK, John DILLEY, James HAMILTON, James HUGHART, Owen KELLEY, John LYNCH, John McCLUNG, Samuel McDONALD, John MONTGOMERY, Joseph RHEA, William RIDER, Robert STUART, and Stephen WILSON. Morton, Oren F., ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , pp.108-109.
  • 1791 - James KEISTER married, 1791, to Malinda GRIM. Oren F. Morton's HISTORY OF PENDLETON COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA (1910).
  • 1791 - Robert CURRY and Sarah YOUNG were married, 22 April 1791, at Augusta County, Virginia. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.17, p.6.
  • 1791 - Gerreld SCOTT and Amey DYER were married, 13 June 1791, at Dinwiddie County, Virginia.
  • 1791 - William GLEN married, 15 June 1791, in Augusta Co., Virginia, to Anny CURRY.
  • 1791 - James KINCAID married, (Bond, 26 Aug, Minister's return 30 Aug. 1791), at Bath County, Virginia, to Jean (or Jane) CURRY, daughter of Robert CURRY. Joseph KINKEAD was surety; Robert CURRY consented for daughter Jean; Witness was Joseph KINKEAD; Minister was John MONTGOMERY. Constance Corley Metheny and Eliza Warwick Wise, BATH COUNTY MARRIAGE BONDS and MINISTERS' RETURNS (1978), p.1.
  • 1791 - James CURRY and Eleanor BRYAN were married, 26 Sept. 1791, at Frederick Co., Virginia. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.18, p.5.
  • 1791 - Samuel VANCE, Assessor of the First District, Bath County, Virginia, in 1791, lists the following as among the Heads of Families: John BYRD (Back Creek), John BYRD (Jackson's River), Thomas BYRD, Jacob BYRD, Sophia CHESTNUT (widow), Jacob CLEEK, John DEEVER, Colonel John DICKENSON, John DILLY, Robert GIVENS, William GIVENS, Ebram GUM, John GUM, David GWIN, Joseph GWIN, James HAMILTON, Alexander HAMILTON, Jr., Osborn HAMILTON, Thomas HICKLIN, Capt. James HICKLIN, John HICKLIN, Ralph LAFFERTY, John LEWIS, Andrew LEWIS, Margaret LEWIS (widow), James LOCKRIDGE, William LOCKRIDGE, Jean LOCKRIDGE (widow), Archibald MATHENY, Luke MATHENY, John McCALLISTER, William RIDER, Robert STUART, James STUART (son of Robert), William STUART, Edward STUART, John STUART, James STUART (constable), and others. Morton, Oren F., ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , pp.118-120.
  • 1791 - Samuel THORNTON married (Bond, 1 Oct, Minister's return, 15 Oct. 1791), at Bath County, Virginia, to Elizabeth RIDER. Surety, Peter FLEET; Elizabeth consents for herself; Witness, William CRAWFORD; Minister was Chrisotopher CLARK. Constance Corley Metheny and Eliza Warwick Wise, BATH COUNTY MARRIAGE BONDS and MINISTERS' RETURNS (1978), p.1.
  • 1791 - Henry STUART married, (Bond 13 Dec., Return 19 Dec. 1791), at Bath County, Virginia, to Sarah MOORE. Samuel McDONALD was surety; Consent by Mary MOORE, Jean MOORE and Robert STEWART; Witnesses were James STEWART and James HUGHART; Minister was John MONTGOMERY. Constance Corley Metheny and Eliza Warwick Wise, BATH COUNTY MARRIAGE BONDS and MINISTERS' RETURNS (1978), p.2.
  • 1792 - William BIRD and Caziah HINMAN were married, 7 Jan. 1792, at Accomack Co., Virginia.
  • 1792 - Jacob BIRD, son of John and Susanna (WINTROW) BIRD, married, 10 Feb. 1792, to Margaret WADE, daughter of Otho WADE. Otho WADE consents for daughter Margaret. Jacob BIRD died in 1821. Constance Corley Metheny and Eliza Warwick Wise, BATH COUNTY MARRIAGE BONDS and MINISTERS' RETURNS (1978), p.2.
  • 1792 - Tom HARRISON, Jr. married, 10 Apr 1792, to Mary CURRY, dau. of Adam and Ann CURRY. They removed to Washington Co., Tennessee, about 1820. J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.326,400.
  • 1792 - Robert STUART married, 24 Apr 1792, to Polly ARMSTRONG, at Augusta Co., Virginia.
  • 1792 - "Deed between John HAMILTON, Isabel BARKER, the late wife of James STEWART, Ralph STEWART, and others, purchase of John McCLANAHAN, 1,000 acres of land on the Monangahelia River, Tygart's Valley." The eastern branch of the Monongahelia River was named for David TYGART in 1772, and since known as Tygart's Valley River. Florence Smith Dickerson's, THE JAMES STEWART FAMILY , p.54.
  • 1792 - Alexander STEUART married second, in 1792, to Mary MOORE. They had daughter, Priscilla STEUART, b. 1794, who married, 1812, to Benjamin HALL. Daughters of the American Colonists D.A.C. #5875.
  • 1792 - John HARRISON married, 1792, in Rockingham Co., Va. to Elizabeth STUART, Francis STUART consenting, Witness was Zeb BALDWIN.
  • 1792 - Robert STEWART and Amey RAINS were married, 3 May 1792, Dinwiddie County, Virginia.
  • 1792 - Samuel LESLEY married, 4 Aug 1792, to Betty STUART in Augusta Co., Virginia.
  • 1792 - James LEE and Mary CALLAHAN were married, 10 Aug. 1792, at Culpeper Co., Virginia. Note also that James LEE was bondsman at the wedding of John WORTHINGTON and Nancy CALLAHAN, 1797, at Pendleton, County, Virginia. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.24, p.18.
  • 1792 - William W. CURRY (1792-1864), son of William and Jane CURRY, was born in Augusta Co., Va. He married, 25 Aug 1818, in Augusta County to Betsy FORSYTHE.
  • 1792 - Dennis CALLAGHAN was Surety and witness at the wedding of James ARTHUR and Susanna MURPHY at Bath County, Virginia, 1 October 1792. Constance Corley Metheny and Eliza Warwick Wise, BATH COUNTY MARRIAGE BONDS and MINISTERS' RETURNS (1978), p.5.
  • 1792 - John CALLAGHAN married, 2 November 1792, at Bath Co., Virginia, to Margaret HUTCHISON. Surety was Francis FORD. Constance Corley Metheny and Eliza Warwick Wise, BATH COUNTY MARRIAGE BONDS and MINISTERS' RETURNS (1978), p.5
  • 1792 - James BURKE and Sophia CHESTNUT were married, 3 Nov. 1792, at Pendleton Co., Virginia. Bondsman was Valentine BIRD. John WADE gave consent for daughter, Sophia CHESTNUT. Mary Harter, PENDLETON COUNTY, VIRGINIA MARRIAGE BONDS 1791-1853 (1979), p.4.
  • 1792 - George Taylor CRUMP married, 20 November 1792, at Bath Co., Virginia, to Ann CALLAHAN, daughter of Charles CALLAHAN. William GIVEN, Jr. was SURETY; Charles CALLAHAN consents for daughter Ann; witnesses were Alexander WILEY and William STEWART; minister was George GUTHRIE. Constance Corley Metheny and Eliza Warwick Wise, BATH COUNTY MARRIAGE BONDS and MINISTERS' RETURNS (1978), p.5
  • 1792 - John BIRD and Margaret MEHOLLOMS were married, 26 Nov. 1792, at Northampton Co., Virginia.
  • 1792 - Robert BIRD, enlisted at Little Laurel, Kentucky and served from 1 July 1792 to 1 Jan 1794, as a private in Capt. David Logan's company of militia in General WAYNE's War against the Indians. He enlisted again in 1813 as a private in Capt. James HALL's company of Kentucky militia, but because of disability resulting from injury of one foot when he fell into a well, did not march with this company. He again enlisted and served in May 1832 as a private in Capt. BARNES' company of rangers in the Black Hawk War in Illinois. In June 1852, while residing in Washington County, Oregon Territory, aged 75 years, he applied for bounty land and received Bounty land Warrant #26786. He stated then that in 1800, he resided in Barron County, Kentucky, where his home was destroyed by fire. Robert BIRD married, but the name of his wife is not given. His son, William Milton BIRD lived near Louisville, Kentucky in 1854. See National Archives Pension File S35807.
  • 1792 - Mounce BYRD of Shenandoah, William BYRD, Andrew BYRD of Rockingham, Anthony READER of Rockingham and George RADER of Rockingham signed a petition for the formation of a new county out of Rockingham and Shenandoah in 1792.
  • 1793 - Adam Arbogast was appointed Ensign in the Pendleton Co. Militia in 1793. He married Margaret HULL, dau. of Peter and Susannah (DIEFFENBACH) HULL.
  • 1793 - Dennis CALLAHAN purchased, in 1793, from John DICKENSON, 76 acres on Ugly Creek. Oren F. Morton ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.35.
  • 1793 - Frederick KEISTER married, 1793, to Ann E. PROPST. Oren F. Morton's HISTORY OF PENDLETON COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA (1910).
  • 1793 - Dennis CALLAGHAN gave consent for the marriage bond of William ROBERTS and Elizabeth BARTLE, 25 Sept. 1793, at Bath County, Virginia.
  • 1793 - John DICKENSON consented to the marriage of his daughter, Martha DICKINSON to John SHREWSBURY, and asked that the license be sent by son-in-law, William Samuel SHREWSBURY. Surety on the bond, 12 November 1793, was Samuel SHREWSBURY. Constance Corley Metheny and Eliza Warwick Wise, BATH COUNTY MARRIAGE BONDS and MINISTERS' RETURNS (1978), p.7.
  • 1794 - Loftus PULLIN consented to the marriage of his daughter, Patsy PULLINS to Hugh HENRY. Surety on the marriage bond, 10 Jan. 1794, was Jonathan PULLINS. The couple was married 22 January 1794 by George GUTHRIE. Constance Corley Metheny and Eliza Warwick Wise, BATH COUNTY MARRIAGE BONDS and MINISTERS' RETURNS (1978), p.8.
  • 1794 - James DEVER married, 10 September 1794, to Catharine BIRD, dau. of John and Susanna (WINTROW) BIRD. John BIRD consents for daughter, Catherine; Surety, Adam BIRD; Witnesses, Adam BIRD and John DENESON; George GUTHRIE was the minister. Constance Corley Metheny and Eliza Warwick Wise, BATH COUNTY MARRIAGE BONDS and MINISTERS' RETURNS (1978), p.9. Note: The will of an earlier James DEVOOR (DEAVER) of Yohogania County, Virginia; dated 14 November 1778, was attested by Nicholas DEPUE, Tobias DECKER and Daniel DEPUE, Jr.; and proved March 1779. Beneficiaries were children: Jacob, Andrew, Henry, John, Sarah PEARSHAL, Samuel; children under age: David, Moses, Catharine, Francis, James. All his real estate, except the Ferry ("on Monongahela River, from his house over the river to the Mouth of Pidgeon Creek") went to sons David and Moses; however, the court later allotted one third of the Landed Estate to James DEVOIR's widow or Relict, Elizabeth DEVOIR. John DEVOIR was executor of the will. Boyd Crumrine, VIRGINIA COURT RECORDS IN SOUTHWESTERN PENNSYLVANIA , (1974 Reprint), II, 301,346,395,396, III, p.327, I, 526,531.
  • 1794 - Andrew HARPER and Jean CURRY were married, 1794, at Rockbridge Co., Virginia.
  • 1794 - James STEWART married, 20 October 1794, at Bath County, Virginia, to Nancy MOORE. Marget MOORE gave consent for her daughter Nancy, 17 October 1794. Henry STEWART was surety. Witnesses were John HEGHART and Henry STEWART. Minister was John MONTGOMERY. Constance Corley Metheny and Eliza Warwick Wise, BATH COUNTY MARRIAGE BONDS and MINISTERS' RETURNS (1978), p.9.
  • 1794 - Andrew STUART and Hannah KINNEAR were married, 1794, at Rockbridge Co., Virginia.
  • 1794 - Jacob BIRD, son of Jacob and Margaret (WADE) BIRD, was born, 11 Dec. 1794, at Pendleton Co., Virginia. He married, 16 May 1816, to Elizabeth YEAGER and died, 23 December 1850, at Fillmore, Andrew Co., Missouri.
  • 1795 - James CURRY married, 19 Feb. 1795, to Mary BROOKINGS in Augusta Co., Virginia.
  • 1795 - John RIDER was surety on the marriage bond of Andrew MINES and Elizabeth BRISCO, 26 Feb. 1795, at Bath County, Virginia. Constance Corley Metheny and Eliza Warwick Wise, BATH COUNTY MARRIAGE BONDS and MINISTERS' RETURNS (1978), p.10.
  • 1795 - Hugh DONAHO married, 1795, at Augusta County (later Bath Co.), Virginia, to Ann USHER, daughter of Robert USHER.
  • 1795 - John DEEVER was surety on the marriage bond of Leonard WADE and Rosana HOLCOM, 12 March 1795, Bath County, Virginia. Constance Corley Metheny and Eliza Warwick Wise, BATH COUNTY MARRIAGE BONDS and MINISTERS' RETURNS (1978), p.10.
  • 1795 - Battis BIRD and Susanna LAWRENCE were married, 23 March 1795, at Brunswick Co., Virginia.
  • 1795 - Jacob COKENHOUR and Susanna RADER were married, 26 April 1795, at Rockingham Co., Virginia.
  • 1795 - James HICKMAN married Margaret BIRD, 11 June 1795, at Bath County, Virginia. Surety was Andrew BOURLAND; minister was John MONTGOMERY. Constance Corley Metheny and Eliza Warwick Wise, BATH COUNTY MARRIAGE BONDS and MINISTERS' RETURNS (1978), p.10.
  • 1795 - Bartholomew MEARS and Rebecca BIRD were married, 31 Aug. 1795, at Accomack Co., Virginia.
  • 1795 - In 1795, Matthew PATTON, son-in-law of Roger DYER, sold his homestead to Col. Peter HULL for $5,000. and went to Kentucky. This Matthew PATTON had married Hester, daughter of Roger DYER. See Morton, Oren F., HISTORY OF HIGHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.357.
  • 1795c- Colonel Andrew LEWIS (1772-1833), son of Charles LEWIS, married Margaret STUART. Morton, Oren F., ANNALS OF BATH COUNTY, VIRGINIA , p.93.
  • 1795 - Alexander STEWART and Dorothea SEE were married, 1795, at Botetourt Co., Virginia.
  • 1795 - James STEWERT was surety on the marriage bond of James McLAUGHLIN and Margaret TOMME, 21 Nov. 1795, at Bath County, Virginia.
  • 1796 - John RIDER (1773-1855) married first, 12 Feb 1796, in Rockingham Co., Va., to Susanna CURRY, dau. of Adam CURRY; Jno. WALSH, bondsman. John RIDER's name is recorded as "John RADER" in the marriage record. She died 4 Oct 1834, at Springston, Harrison Co., Va. and he married second to Susannah STOUT. He died, 1855. in Barbour Co., WV. See Rider, Fremont RIDER/RYDER GENEALOGY (1858); Harry M. Strickler, OLD TENTH LEGION, ROCKINGHAM CO., VA. MARRIAGES , p.101.
  • 1796 - Andrew BIRD and Mary HOLKER were married, 14 March 1796, at Shenandoah Co., Virginia.
  • 1796 - Samuel W. McMULLEN married, 19 June 1796 (bond), at Bath Co., Virginia, to Jennet STEWART. Surety, Robert STEWART, Jr.; Robert STUART consents; witnesses were Adam McCOOL, James STEWART, Robert STEWART; minister was John MONTGOMERY. Constance Corley Metheny and Eliza Warwick Wise, BATH COUNTY MARRIAGE BONDS and MINISTERS' RETURNS (1978), p.13.
  • 1796 - Alexander STUART and Ann REED were married, 1796, at Orange Co., Virginia.
  • 1796 - Richard RIDER and Agnes KILLPATRICK were married, 27 July 1796 (bond), at Bath County, Virginia. Surety was James WILEY; Agnis consents for herself; witness was James WILEY; Minister was George GUTHRIE. Constance Corley Metheny and Eliza Warwick Wise, BATH COUNTY MARRIAGE BONDS and MINISTERS'RETURNS (1978), p.12.
  • 1796 - Jno. COVELL (or CARRELL) and Deborah RADER (RIDER) were
  • married, 27 Sept. 1796, at Rockingham Co., Virginia, by A MOFFETT. Harry M. Strickler, OLD TENTH LEGION,vROCKINGHAM CO., VA. MARRIAGES , p.44; Cecil D. McDonald,Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.18, p.3.
  • 1796 - William BIRD and Polly CARTER were married, 19 Nov. 1796, at Charlotte Co., Virginia.
  • 1796 - John STUART and Ann GAULDIN were married, Nov. 1796, at Campbell Co., Virginia.
  • 1796 - Richard BIRD officiated at weddings at Bath County, Virginia in 1796/97.
  • 1797 - William RIDER's estate was inventoried in Shenandoah Co., Virginia in 1797.
  • 1797 - John GREER married, 10 Jan. 1797 (bond), to Jean CALLAGHAN. Surety was Edward STEWART. Constance Corley Metheny and Eliza Warwick Wise, BATH COUNTY MARRIAGE BONDS and MINISTERS' RETURNS (1978), p.14.
  • 1797 - George KEISTER and Susanna PECK were married, (bond) 24 Jan 1797, at Pendleton Co, Virginia. Garret PECK was bondsman. Mary Harter, MARRIAGES OF PENDLETON COUNTY, VIRGINIA 1788-1853 (1978), p.38.
  • 1797 - Johan Jacob WINTEROTH (1735-1797) died 3 Feb 1797, at Littlestown (then York County), Penna. and is buried in the cemetery of Christ Reformed Church there. Littlestown is located just on the Pennsylvania-Maryland border in present Adams County about thirty miles northeast of Frederick, Md.
  • 1797 - John McKEE and Mary PATTON were married, 1797, at Rockbridge Co., Virginia.
  • 1797 - Adam CURRY and Phebe HARRISON were married, 13 March 1797, at Rockingham Co., Virginia according to: WILLIAM AND MARY QUARTERLY , v.3, p.242. However, take note that Adam CURRY and Phebe HICKMAN were married, 13 March 1797, at Rockingham Co., Virginia according to: Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.12, p.5; Harry M. Strickler's, OLD TENTH LEGION, ROCKINGHAM CO., VA. MARRIAGES , p.44.
  • 1797 - Rebecca CURRY, dau. of Robert and Phebe (SAMPLE) CURRY was born, 7 June 1797, in Rockingham Co., Va. She married, 6 July 1815, Andrew MOORE (1792-1871) and resided at Pleasant and West Georgetown, Brown County, Ohio. In a 1974 letter Mavis SMITH of Fremont, CA wrote, "My family is thus: Rebecca CURRY born, 7 Jun 1797, in Rockingham co., Va., married Andrew MOORE in Ohio. Her father is Robert CURRY born abt. 1759 in Augusta Co., Va. (this is the same area as Rockingham Co., in 1797, as Rockingham county was made from Augusta County). Robert had a brother John. Now there is a question as to Robert's father. My family has James CURRY; but in some Ohio research the record said that Robert received his land from James CURRY, an Uncle. But in L.D.S. church records Rebecca gives James as her grandfather."
  • 1797 - John KINCAID and William DEAN were witnesses to the marriage bond of James ARMSTRONG and Jane KINKEAD, 20 July 1797, at Bath County, Virginia. Robert KINCAED consents as guardian for Jean. Joel WALKER was surety. Constance Corley Metheny and Eliza Warwick Wise, BATH COUNTY MARRIAGE BONDS and MINISTERS' RETURNS (1978), p.15.
  • 1797 - John HEADRICK and Molly KEISTER were married, 28 Aug. 1797, at Rockingham Co., Virginia. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.5, p.8.
  • 1797 - John SHARP married, 30 Sept 1797, to Elizabeth CURRY in Augusta Co., Virginia.
  • 1797 - John WORTHINGTON and Nancy CALAHAN were married (bond), 11 October 1797, at Pendleton Co., Virginia. Bondsman was James LEE.
  • 1797 - Charles WARD and Elizabeth DYER were married, 1797, at Pendleton Co., Virginia. Mary Harter, MARRIAGES OF PENDLETON COUNTY, VIRGINIA 1788-1853 (1978), pp.17,75.
  • 1797 - Clemens ERWIN (or EWIN) and Jane STUART were married, 5 December 1797, at Rockingham Co., Virginia. Cecil D. McDonald, Jr., SOME VIRGINIA MARRIAGES 1700-1799 , v.8, p.9.
  • 1797 - Joseph HENDERSON married, 21 Dec. 1797, to Maria CHESTNUT. Surety was Moses HEUCHIN; Sophia BURK consents for her dau. Maria CHESTNUT; witnesses were Moses OUCHIN and Otho WADE. Maria (CHESTNUT) HENDERSON married 2nd, 1801, to Timothy HOLCOLM. Constance Corley Metheny and Eliza Warwick Wise, BATH COUNTY MARRIAGE BONDS and MINISTERS' RETURNS (1978), pp.16,24.
  • 1797 - --?-- CURREY married, 27 December 1797, at Bath County, Virginia, to Mary EWINS. Richard BIRD was minister. Constance Corley Metheny and Eliza Warwick Wise, BATH COUNTY MARRIAGE BONDS and MINISTERS' RETURNS (1978), p.16.
  • 1798 - Jeremiah BURNETT and Sarah BIRD married, 3 Jan. 1798, at Pittsylvania Co., Virginia. (Note also the John BIRD/BURNETT marriage in Middlesex Co, Va., 1732.)
  • 1798 - Robert STEWART married, 9 January 1798, at Bath County, Virginia, to Catherine ELSHIRE. Surety was Elisha WILLIAMS; Ben ELISHIE consents for dau. Catherine; witnesses were Elisha WILLIAMS, James STEWART and Henry STEWART; minister, Jas. WARD. Constance Corley Metheny and Eliza Warwick Wise, BATH COUNTY MARRIAGE BONDS and MINISTERS' RETURNS (1978), p.16.
  • 1798 - William STUART and Jane GIVEN were married, (bond) 8 Feb. 1798, at Pendleton Co., Virginia. Bondsman was Thomas WILLSON.
  • 1798 - James RIDER, son of William RIDER, married (bond 5 March 1798 - return 15 March 1798), to Sarah CHESTNUT. Surety was Isaac BRISCOE; Sophia BAURK consents for dau. Sarah; William RIDER consents for son James; Witnesses were Isaac BRISCO and John DENNISON. Minister was Jas. WARD. Constance Corley Metheny and Eliza Warwick Wise, BATH COUNTY MARRIAGE BONDS and MINISTERS' RETURNS (1978), p.17.
  • 1798 - Edward ERVIN and Polly STUART were married, 22 May 1798, at Rockingham Co., Virginia.
  • 1798 - Clement ERWIN and Jane STUART were married, 1798, at Rockingham Co., Virginia. WILLIAM AND MARY QUARTERLY , v.3, p.243.
  • 1798 - James CURRY and Hannah ARCHIBALD were married, 1798, at Rockbridge County, Virginia.
  • 1798 - James DYER and Sarah FORTUNE were married, 16 July 1798, at Henry County, Virginia.b
  • 1798 - Adam BIRD (1768-1850), son of John and Susanna (WINTROW) BIRD, married, 29 Aug 1798, to Elizabeth RYDER, dau. of William RIDER of Back Creek. Surety, John RIDER; William RIDER consents for daughter, Elizabeth; Witnesses, James RIDER, William RIDER and John RIDER. Constance Corley Metheny and Eliza Warwick Wise, BATH COUNTY MARRIAGE BONDS and MINISTERS' RETURNS (1978), p.17.
  • 1798 - Abram BIRD established a warehouse in Bird's Point, Missouri in 1798 to sell provisions to flatboatmen making the long trip downriver.
  • 1798 - Edmund PARKS and Peggy BIRD were married, 24 Dec. 1798, at Accomack Co., Virginia.
  • 1799 - Henry STEWART married, 25 February 1799, at Bath County, Virginia, to Elizabeth KELLY. Constance Corley Metheny and Eliza Warwick Wise, BATH COUNTY MARRIAGE BONDS and MINISTERS' RETURNS (1978), p.18
  • 1799 - William DYER and Margaret RIDDLE, dau. of Jno. RIDDLE, were married, 19 March 1799, at Rockingham Co., Virginia. Harry M. Strickler, OLD TENTH LEGION, ROCKINGHAM COUNTY, VA. MARRIAGES , p.49.
  • 1799 - William C. RIDER, son of John and Susanna (CURRY) RIDER was born, 9 April 1799, in Virginia.
  • 1799 - Gabriel KILE and Mary KEISTER were married, ca.1799. Morton, Oren F., HISTORY OF PENDLETON COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA .
  • 1799 - A John BIRD married, 8 June 1799, at Bath County, Virginia, to Rebecca A. H. WHITE. Surety was Andrew HAMILTON; Val WHITE gave his consent for daughter Rebecca; witnesses were A. MUSTOE and Andrew MOORE; minister, Josiah OSBORNE.
  • 1799 - John DYER married, 10 September 1799, at Rockingham County, Virginia, to Elizabeth HARRISON, dau. of Davis HARRISON. Reuben HARRISON was surety. J. Houston Harrison, SETTLERS BY THE LONG GREY TRAIL (1935), p.324; Harry M. Strickler, OLD TENTH LEGION, ROCKINGHAM COUNTY, VA. MARRIAGES , p.49.
  • 1799 - Samuel CURRY witnessed the marriage bond of John SMITH and Rebeckah CARRICK, 15 Oct. 1799, at Bath County, Virginia.c
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NW Okie's Corner

Vol 14, Iss 44 Bayfield, Colorado - I have a good friend down in Houston, Texas I have reconnected with in the last few years, who has been in remission from Cancer for four years. Ellen, her family, and our family first met in the early 1980's when we were neighbors in Clear Lake City, Texas. Our sons became friends and playmates during that time. Like most friendships over time, you get separated and loose connection, but not forgotten -- only to find each other again thirty some years later.

Anyway, back to the real reason I bring this up Ellen is a freelance writer -- has co-authored Chapter 15 in a book entitled, "Paintamers," available at Barnes & Nobel and Amazon.com. If you get a chance, check it out! If you know of someone in chronic pain, let them know about it. Again the title of the book is "Paintamers" and it is available in paperback. Sadly, though, it is not yet available in the Kindle version. I just purchased my copy from Amazon.com. Pain medicine is a relatively new field of medicine. Although easing pain has been an imperative in medical practice from the beginning of medical care, we know very little.

Trying To Understand Anti-Obama Haters

Why do so many alleged fair-minded Voters in Oklahoma, Kansas, Southern States and other hot-beds of Anti-Obama locales "Loathe" President Obama, and spread their anti-Obama hatred and propaganda? Why do they believe all the absurd falsehoods spread through chain-emails, Facebook and other social networks no matter how preposterous these absurd rumors might be? This puzzles me to no end! Does it puzzle you?

Let us open our minds, uncover our ears and eyes and be honest with ourselves. Can we honestly come to an understanding of what might be at the core of these hateful rantings of "anti-Obamaisms" .... And leave out the hateful remarks?

Some seem to think that President Obama's story does not fit the historic American presidential dialogue or pattern of past norms. Why do people refuse to leave their comfort zones to embrace the changes we have seen in the 21st-Century of the cosmopolitan, internationalized World where different cultures can come together and unite as a family?

President Obama is of mixed heritage. Yes! That is true! We are all of mixed heritage. If you have ever done research on your own genealogy, you can find there are facts to back that theory up. We are all, to some extent, descendants of European ancestry, who crossed an ocean looking for freedom and a better life from persecution. Some of those pioneering ancestors might have Native American (Indian). blood

Through my research I have found many of my ancestry were English, Scots, Irish, Welsh, Bohemians, Dutch, Germans and with a touch of Russia, which is on the maternal lineage of the WALLMAN ancestry). Each escaping their country from persecutions of religion, financial and famines as far back as the 17th and 18th centuries.

Let us open our minds, Uncover our eyes and ears . . . Be honest with ourselves!

Why doesn't Obama's story fit the historic American presidential dialogue pattern of past norms? Why do people refuse to leave their comfort zones to embrace the 21st-Century of this cosmopolitan, internationalized World where different cultures can come together and unite as a family?

FORWARD 2012! VOTE OBAMA & A Congress that believes in America, Senior Citizens, Students, disabled citizens, Veterans and the Working Class!

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NW Okie's Corner

Vol 14, Iss 40 Bayfield, CO - Besides taking in the golden cools of the aspens in southwest colorado, I have been busy reading a Southern Historical Magazine published in August, 1892 and concerning some Pioneer History of my WARWICK ancestry. The history takes us through my 5th great grand uncle, Jacob Warwick (sometimes referred to as John or Jake).

I think my Warwick lineage runs something like the following "Alledged Warwick Lineage" below, but I am confused as to those listed as children of Lt. Warwick and Elizabeth Dunlap.

West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia by Jim Comstock or the most recent publication is History of Pocahontas County, West Virginia, 1981. This latter publication, pages 475 and 476, lists Jacob Warwick's parents as Lt. John Warwick (sometimes referred to as John, William & Jacob) and Elizabeth Dunlap of Middlebrook, VA. and goes on to say that John was employed in service to the King in locating and surveying land grants. He owned property in Bath County and Mathewsville, VA (Now Dunmore). There is some further information about John.

The Immigrant WARWICK Brothers

It is believed that William had a brother, John, that emigrated from England to America. There was another genealogy web page showing the eldest brother, William, married Elizabeth DUNLAP of Middlebrook sometime around 1737 in Orange County, Virginia. The following year John Lewis' frontier settlement was removed from the jurisdiction of Orange and the new eminence Augusta County was formed. Elizabeth was the daughter of Alexander DUNLAP and his wife Janet Ann McFARLAND (sometimes referred to as "Jenot" or "Jeani"). Alexander is said to have been the son of a soldier who was at the siege of Londondarry. Mrs. DUNLAP was a descendent of Calan McFARLAND.

Alexander & Ann McFARLAND DUNLAP had originally settled near Philadelphia before moving to Middlebrook, a settlement at the head waters of the Middle River in Virginia.

In the early 1740's the DUNLAPs moved west over the Great North Mountain and settled on the Calfpasture River. It is said that they were the first to live on the "Pastures" (the area around the Calf, Cow & Bullpasture Rivers) and at that time the farthest most western settlers on the Virginia frontier.

In 1743 Alexander DUNLAP was appointed Captain of horse in the militia, but the following year, 1744, he died. His widow later married Robert BRATTON.

Captain Alexander and Ann DUNLAP are known to have had at least four children: John, Robert, Alexander Jr. and Elizabeth, wife of William WARWICK.

William and Elizabeth WARWICK joined Capt. DUNLAP when he ventured into the pastures to raise their family in Middlebrook. It shows the following children of Lt. William and Elizabeth Dunlap Warwick as: Janet or Jean, James, Martha, William Jr., John and Jacob, the latter being the youngest born in 1747. This is what I show. Is it correct?

In the "Southern Historical Magazine - August, 1892" it shows us through Rev. Price's piece on "Pioneer History" that Lt. Warwick and his wife, Elizabeth Dunlap, had four children: Charles, Elizabeth, Jacob and John. So . . . I am confused! Is the William Warwick, Jr (II) misnamed, misplaced? And . . . how does that effect William Warwick III? Is William Warwick III misnamed, misplaced? I need more research to figure this out this puzzle, huh?

Alleged WARWICK Lineage

  1. Jacob WARWICK (1743 - 1826), 5th great grand uncle
  2. Elizabeth DUNLAP (1690 - 1805), 6th great grandmother, Mother of Jacob.
  3. (?) William WARWICK Jr (1749 - 1796), 5th great grandfather, Son of Elizabeth (?)
  4. (?) William WARWICK III (1772 - 1834), 4th great grandfather, Son of William (?)
  5. Robert Craig WARWICK (1801 - 1845), 3rd great grandfather, Son of William
  6. William Fechtig WARWICK (1822 - 1902), 2nd great grandfather, Son of Robert Craig
  7. John Robert WARWICK (1857 - 1937), great grandfather, Son of William Fechtig
  8. Constance Estella WARWICK (1882 - 1968), grandmother, Daughter of John Robert
  9. Gene M MCGILL (1914 - 1986), father, oldest Son of Constance Estella
  10. Linda Kay MCGILL, 3rd daughter of Gene McGill

I am Woman! Watch me VOTE For . . . DEMOCRATS2012 & OBAMA2012!

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NW Okie's Corner

Vol 14, Iss 37 Bayfield, CO - As we scour the historic newspaper for bits of genealogy in search of our ancestry, we found the following in the historic American newspapers for Highland Recorder, out of Monterey, Highland county, Virginia, 16th, 23rd & 30th of August 1907, concerning Martin Dever (dec'd ) and a public filing of his administrator, Charles P. Jones vs. Samuel G. Dever and others.

The object of the suit was to have ascertained, the proper heirs and distributes of Martin Dever, dec'd, and to have his estate settled under the control and protection of the court.

It reads as follows: "And it appearing from affidavit filed that Walter Gwin, Signora Warwick, John Andrew Moore, I. Price Moore, Harry S. Gum. Paul L. Gum, the unknown heirs of Lee Dever, Dennis Dever, Alice Barnett, the unknown heirs of George Lantz dec'd, the unknown heir of Minnie Fultz dec'd, and Hugh Dever were all nonresidents of the state of Virginia. It was ordered that they do appear within fifteen days after due publication and do what is necessary to protect their interests. Teste" J. C. Matheny, Clerk and Chas. P. Jones & son p.q.

Signora Warwick, as mentioned in an earlier newsletter, was my great grandmother on the father's mother's side of the family. Walter Gwin was my Great Grand Uncle, and Signora's older brother.

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NW Okie's Corner

Vol 14, Iss 28 Bayfield, CO - The day after the 4th of July, we set our video camera on time-lapse to capture the hummingbirds who were taking in sweet nectar from the hummingbird feeder outside our living room window, Thursday morning.



HOHL/ WARWICK Ancestry

While doing some genealogy research on Ancestry.com we found a story concerning our 5th Great Grandfather, Peter Thomas Hohl (1706-1776). But we will get to that later down the page.

Peter Thomas HOHL/HULL was born in Desloch, Worms, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany. In 1741 he immigrated to the New World and settling around Crabbottom, Augusta, Virginia. Peter married Susannah Margaretha Dieffenbacher, 25 November 1750, in the Trinity Lutheran Church, in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Peter and Susannah's children were: Catherine, Margaret, Peter Jr., Adam (our 4th great grandfather, born 1754 in Augusta, Virginia; married Esther Keister (1767-1825), died Jun 1836, in Pendleton County, Virginia), George Sr., Jacob, Phebe Anistasia.

My HOHL/HULL ancestors married into the Warwick family. Adam & Esther HOHL/HULL had a daughter Esther (1804-1853), who married Robert Craig Warwick (1801-1845). Robert Craig Warwick & Esther HOHL/HULL had a son William Fechtig Warwick (1822-1902), who married Phebe Anthea Pray (1833-1905). Wm Fechtig & Phebe Anthea Pray Warwick were our 2nd great grandparents. And that leads us to our great grandfather, John Robert Warwick (1857-1937), who married Signora Belle Gwin. John & Signora's childred were Constance Estella, Robert Lee and Wilbur (died in infancy).

Story of Peter Hull/Hohl

In 1753, part of the tract on the Shenandoah River, purchased by Peter HOHL/HULL in 1752, was delivered to a Nicholas TROUT on 3 January 1753. Nicholas TROUT was a friend and neighbor of Peter HOHL/HULL. Not long after this land transaction between HOHL/HULL and TROUT, they were (as it is told) having a friendly conversation, during which TROUT playfully pulled a gun from HULL's hand, pulling the muzzle toward him.

According to witnesses and court records, the gun accidentally discharged, instantly killing TROUT. An inquest was held, and Peter HOHL/HULL (an influential person in the settlement) was found blameless. The gun was found guilty.

From the Original Petitions and Papers filed in Augusta County Court - 1753-54, Part I, we find the following: "Inquisition on the body of Nicholas TROUT, 17 July 1753. Jurors do say that the said Nicholas TROUT, in simplicity, without malice, playing with Peter HOHL/HULL and seizing a gun in said HULL's hands and pulling its' muzzle towards him 'she' accidentally went off without any act or knowledge of the said HULL and discharged herself with a ball and two great shots into ye breast of said TROUT, of which he died immediately on ye spot, and quit ye gun wherewith ye same was done was entirely in fault for not keeping her bounds, but going off without force or consent." In teste: Peter SCHOLL, Coroner; John STEVENSON, Ledwick FRANCISCO, John MacMICHEL, James BRUSTER, Thomas WATS, Thomas CRAWFORD, Patrick MILICAN, John WILSON, Jacob HARMAN, Niclas NOLL, Hennery DALY, Jacob NICHOLAS. - Augusta County, Virginia, Court Records, v.I, p.440.

Since our pioneer ancestors settled in the Valley of Virginia by way of Pennsylvania after immigrating from Germany, we continue our reading of the history of Virginia by learning some history of Pendleton county, on the western side of West Virginia.

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NW Okie's Corner

Vol 13, Iss 52 Bayfield, CO - This 2011 year is almost over! Where has it gone? What will you remember the most of year 2011? AND . . . How is your Fantasy College Bowl games turning out? I am leading our pack in the Bowl games. I did not do so well in the NCAA college football league, though. I was last place. Must have saved my energy for the bowl games, huh?

We hope you had a Merry Christmas with your family and friends! Were you one of those lucky (or unlucky) enough to have a white christmas? It was cold here in Southwest Corner of Colorado, but with no accumulation of new snow.

It has been hard settling down to write this week without enjoying family that has settled around here. So . . . We are keeping this week's OkieLegacy short so we can get back to family.

We have been updating and moving some archived website files around our various websites. You can view those updates at the following URLs below. We will be updating some things on The OkieLegacy (okielegacy.org) here in the next few weeks.

  1. Paris Times Pioneers & Genealogy
  2. Prairie Pioneer News
  3. NW OkieLegacy
  4. SW Colorado Weather Cam

Happy New Year from our OkieLegacy Family! See you all next year, 2012!

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NW Okie's Corner

Vol 13, Iss 50 Bayfield, CO - This last week we were remembering one of those dates (7 December 1941) that has lived in infamy for 70 years and our World War II (WWII) Veterans. Did you have a WWII veteran in your family? Are you doing genealogy research for those veteran ancestry?

Then you will need to check out what Ancestry.com has added to it's research tools. You can search all the WWII records and learn more about your family's connection to "a date which will live in infamy" by searching their WWII Draft cards of young men, 1898-1929 and other WWII military records.

Bill Barker sent us some photos and research he has been doing in Georgia concerning the Georgia Chapter of the Trail of tears and where Sequoyah lived while doing his syllabary. Since we are running late to night and can not get everything in to this week's OkieLegacy Ezine, we will include more of Bill Barker's research and findings in next week's OkieLegacy Ezine.

I have been busy learning a new web design software app (RapidWeaver) for the Mac and giving my Paris Times Pioneers (genealogy) a NEW LOOK for 2012. You might want to check it out, also! I am still adding some pages to the HURT Legacy pages, but most of everything is uploaded so far. Bookmark the web site and keep checking back momentarily.

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NW Okie's Corner

Vol 13, Iss 40 Bayfield, Colorado - Good Monday morning to all! But this may be evening by the time I get this OkieLegacy Ezine published. We just back from NW Oklahoma to view the Fall colors if SW Colorado. Some beautiful golds of Aspens lined our path over the Eastern slope of Wolf Creek yesterday late afternoon into dusk.

You can check out our Facebook and Picasa web albums for more views of SW Colorado's Fall changing of colors. I need to check out the Fall changes taking place between Durango and Silverton. Hope I can catch them before they peek completely. Maybe they have already peeked.

I was asked what got me into writing my OkieLegacy Ezine. Over the last 14 years or so it has evolved from a simple "Heart To Heart" journal I began writing as therapy to work through some things that I was going through back then. After working through those range of feelings, It helped me find what was important to me and how I wanted to move forward in a more constructive, productive venue . . . discovering my past through genealogy, history of my pioneer ancestors who came to America settling in Virginia, Tennessee, New Amsterdam and other areas on the East coast before moving westward towards Kansas and Oklahoma Territory. I have found that writing helps me put things into perspective so I can move forward in my life.

There is still unanswered questions for some of my pioneer ancestry and unnamed photographs to yet identify, but it has become a labor of love of discovering . . . Who and what I am!

Have you ever wondered . . . If America had not open it doors to immigrant pioneers, where would America be today? Where would you be today?

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NW Okie's Ancestry Corner

Vol 13, Iss 28 Bayfield, Colorado - We want to begin by giving a "Shout out" to the Pine Mountain School District and their teacher, Elizabeth Owens! We received an interesting Thank you email from Elizabeth and her class at Pine Mountain School District this week. As I told Elizabeth, "You never know how many lives you touch through this online media."

Elizabeth told me that she and her class used the genealogy resources from our genealogy website for their class genealogy project. They also sent a link to another genealogy resource [People Search: Genealogy Resources] that they thought would be a good addition to our ParisTimes Pioneers Genealogy resource page. It is listed at the top of our "ParisTimes Pioneers" genealogy resource page.

Some of you might have read Carol Wilmeth's Facebook comment where she says, "My parents were both raised in Guymon, Oklahoma. Dad is 93 and Mom passed away in 2002. I like your stories and fell over your website as I was doing research.

Have you heard about Google+ lately. Check out their Circles, Hangouts, Instant uploads to Picasa, Sparks and Huddle. I am still setting up my "Google+ (Plus)" account, So . . . if you get an invite from me, let this be a fore warning!

Google+ ends social networking fatigue. It isn't just another social network. It's the one place to consolidate all of your social activity.

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NW Okie's Ancestrial Lineage

Vol 13, Iss 22 Bayfield, Colorado - Last week we shared some ancestry lineage of our connection to President Andrew Jackson (Jackson's relationship to me is 1st cousin of husband of 1st cousin 1x removed of husband of 2nd great grand aunt, Nancy McGill, daughter of William Nathan (Jr.) and Nancy Anne (Luttrell) McGill.

We heard from another Craighead descendant on a genealogy forum that says, "Don't know if the following is helpful to your search but is found in the Craighead and McGill family histories: Nancy (last name unknown), born 1787, died 1867, was married first to William McGill of Hamilton Co., TN. They had eleven (11) children including a daughter also named Nancy. William Nathan McGill, Jr. died in May of 1832. Nancy Anne then married Thomas Craighead, of Soddy, TN, in 1835, who had five children from his first wife, Mary Gillespie. Thomas died in September 1839, and is buried at Soddy, Tennessee."

I did happen to find out that my 2nd great grand aunt, Nancy, the daughter of William and Nancy McGill, married Samuel G. Craighead, who was the son of William Craighead (1778-1835) and Jane "Jennie" Gillespie. William Craighead was a brother of Thomas Craighead. Thomas Craighead and Nancy McGill were married February 22, 1838.

I am still reading and searching about the CROCKETT side of the family to see if there is a connection to David "Davy" Crockett of Tennessee. I have NOT found any connection so far, but there must be a really distant connection between my CROCKETT's that married into the WARWICK and MCGILL side of our ancestry.

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NW Okie's Ancestrial Lineage

Vol 13, Iss 20 Bayfield, Colorado - Last week I promised a bit more possible information concerning a really distant connection to one of Benjamin Franklin's older sisters. As I have recently found, it turns out that Benjamin Franklin was a brother-in-law of the 1st cousin 3x removed of Samuel Geddes Craighead (husband) of our 2nd Great Grand Aunt, Nancy McGill, daughter of Wm Nathan McGill, Jr. See Notes and Link. In another feature of this week's OkieLegacy newsletter we have included a short biography of the infamous printer, inventor, politician, statesman and free-mason, Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790).

As I said earlier, Mary Franklin (1694-1731) was an older sister of Benjamin Franklin by about 12 years. Mary was married twice. Her 1st husband was Arthur Aylsworth, when they got married and Mary was 14 years of age, in 1708 and had her first child in 1710. Mary's 2nd husband was Robert HOMES, married 3 April 1716, in Boston, Massachusetts. Mary and Robert Homes had three children: William, Abiah and Robert, Jr.

Robert Homes (1720-1744) was a 1st cousin 3x removed of Samuel Geddes Craighead, who married our 2nd great grand aunt, Nancy McGill, daughter of Wm. Nathan McGill, Jr. and Anne Nancy Luttrell.

Samuel Geddes Craighead (1814-1889) of Tennessee, was a son of Wm. Craighead and Jane Gillespie; Wm. Craighead was the son of Capt. Robert Craighead and Hannah Eleanor Clark; Capt. Robert Craighead was the son of Rev. Alexander Holmes Craighead and Jane Agnes Brown; Rev. Alexander Holmes Craighead was the son of Rev. Thomas Craighead and Margaret Holmes Wallace, which leads us back to Rev. Robert Craighead and Agnes Hart, and their daughter Catherine Craighead, who married Rev. William Homes, who had the son Robert Homes that was the second husband of Mary Franklin. Are you thoroughly confused yet?

This is how the Franklin lineage from Mary Franklin (1694-1731) runs through the HOMES, CRAIGHEAD AND MCGILL ancestry to this NW Okie and her sisters.

Ancestry Lineage:

  • Mary Franklin (1694 - 1731), wife of 1st cousin 3x removed of husband (Samuel G. Craighead) of my 2nd great grand aunt (Nancy McGill);
  • Robert HOMES (1694 - 1727), 2nd Husband of Mary Franklin;
  • Catherine CRAIGHEAD (1672 - 1754), Mother of Robert Homes;
  • Rev. Robert Craighead (1633 - 1711), Father of Catherine Craighead;
  • Rev. Thomas Craighead (1664 - 1739), Son of Rev. Robert Craighead;
  • Rev. Alexander Holmes Craighead (1706 - 1766), Son of Rev. Thomas, Craighead;
  • Capt. Robert Craighead (1751 - 1821), Son of Rev. Alexander Holmes Craighead;
  • William Craighead (1778 - 1835), Son of Capt. Robert Craighead;
  • Samuel Geddes Craighead (1814 - 1889), Son of William Craighead;
  • Nancy MCGILL (1814 - 1898), Wife of Samuel Geddes Craighead;
  • William Nathan MCGILL Jr. (1783 - 1832), Father of Nancy McGill;
  • David Milton MCGILL (1808 - 1850), Son of William Nathan McGill, Jr.;
  • William Pearson MCGILL (1835 - 1918), Son of David Milton McGill;
  • William Jacob MCGILL (1880 - 1959), Son of William Pearson McGill;
  • Gene M MCGILL (1914 - 1986), Son of William Jacob and Constance Estella Warwick. Gene married Vada Eileen Paris in March 1940, and had four daughters: Connie Jean, Dorthy E., Linda Kay and Amber Ann.
If you follow all of the above, it sounds like Benjamin Franklin was an in-law of in-laws of really really distant cousins. So . . . was he related, or NOT? Whatever the outcome, it does not really matter to this NW Okie, except to find out some interesting "founding fathers" possibly crossed the MCGILL ancestry paths! Can not wait to see who else has crossed our ancestry lineage.

I am still trying to find out how the CRAIGHEAD ancestry and the LUTTRELL ancestry connect through a Nancy Craighead (possible birth & death dates, 1757-1867), who allegedly married a Edward LUTTRELL, and who had a daughter Anne Nancy Craighead (1787-1860), who married William Nathan McGill, Jr. (1783-1832).

I did find where a George DUNLOP (DUNLAP) that married Agnes Nancy Craighead, but do not believe they are the same Nancy Craighead. The Agnes Nancy Craighead (1740-1790) that married George Dunlop was on trial for witchcraft in Waxhaw, South Carolina for killing her first husband. George Dunlop proposed to Agnes Nancy Craighead after she had been acquitted of witchcraft in the Waxhaw, SC witchcraft case. Agnes Nancy Craighead was accused of murdering her first husband, the Rev. William Richardson, who was found strangled by a bridal in 1771, 12 years after marrying in 1759. George and Nancy moved from Waxhaw, SC to Charlotte, NC. Their son, David Richardson Dunlap, apparently derives his middle name, "Richardson" from his mother's first husband's surname.

The reason this Nancy Craighead is interesting to me is because there is a DUNLOP (DUNLAP) connection with our WARWICK ancestry. There is always something interesting that pops up in your genealogy search of ancestry. I guess that is one of the reasons I am so hooked on my ancestry, genealogical legacies! To see what I can find and who I possibly am!

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NW Okie's "The Good Old Days"

Vol 13, Iss 11 Bayfield, CO - [The image on the left is the CRAIG family Crest we found online while searching our CRAIG ancestors.]

While the temperatures in the SW Corner of Colorado, San Juan mountains have been in the the mid-fifties, we hear from Perry, Oklahoma and Roy that he has yell daffodil (Jonquils) in bloom and more of them about to be. Here isn Southwest Colorado we are slowly melting the snow on the mountains and the creeks, streams are running rapidly.

WOW! Where does the time go when you get hooked on genealogy research? It seems like one things leads to another and the hours only seem like minutes that pass by too quickly. I have been looking for some Irish ancestors since St. Patrick's Day is just around the corner. I think most of my Irish that I have found are only Scotch-Irish (the term of Scotch-Irish was invented in America).

For instance, the CRAIG ancestors on my paternal side of the family that married into the WARWICKs. Some of the CRAIGs were born in Ulster, Donegal, Ireland, BUT . . . their ancestors were from Scotland. I am still trying to verify some of these CRAIG's, and have listed the lineage that I have come up with so far.

* William Craig (1662 - 1744), 8th great grandfather
* William Alexander Craig (1685 - 1759), Son of William Craig
* Robert Thomas Craig (1712 - 1788), born in Ulster, * Donegal, Ireland, Son of William Alexander Craig
* Robert CRAIG (1741 - 1804), born in Augusta, Virginia, Son of Robert Thomas Craig
* Nancy Agnes CRAIG (1776 - ) born in Green Bank, Pocahontas county, Virginia, Daughter of Robert Craig
* Robert Craig WARWICK (1801 - 1845), Son of Nancy Agnes Craig
* William Fechtig WARWICK (1822 - 1902), Son of Robert Craig Warwick
* John Robert WARWICK (1857 - 1937), Son of William Fechtig Warwick
* Constance Estella WARWICK (1882 - 1968), Daughter of John Robert Warwick
* Gene M MCGILL (1914 - 1986), Son of Constance Estella Warwick
* Linda Kay MCGILL, daughter of Gene M McGill

The Surname CRAIG

The surname of CRAIG is a local name, meaning "at the craig" from residence thereby. Local names usually denoted where a man held his land and indicated where he actually lived. As the name appears in early Scots records in many parts of the country it must have originated from more than one locality.

The surname is very numerous in Counties Antrim, Derry and Tyrone. In the 15th century there were three families "of that Ilk." Johannes del Crag witnessed a charter by William the Lion. John of the Craig "with his band of 300" played a decisive part in the Battle of Culblean on 30th November 1335.

Over the centuries, most people in Europe have accepted their surname as a fact of life, as irrevocable as an act of God, however much the individual may have liked or disliked the surname, they were stuck with it, and people rarely changed them by personal choice. A more common form of variation was in fact involuntary, when an official change was made, in other words, a clerical error. Among the humbler classes of European society, and especially among illiterate people, individuals were willing to accept the mistakes of officials, clerks and priests as officially bestowing a new version of their surname, just as they had meekly accepted the surname they had been born with.

In North America, the linguistic problems confronting immigration officials at Ellis Island in the 19th century were legendary as a prolific source of Anglicization.

A notable member of the name was John Craig (1512-1600) the Scottish reformer. He lost his father at Flodden in 1514. He was educated at St. Andrews, he joined the Dominicans there but fell under the suspician of heresy, and after a brief imprisonment in 1536, he went to Rome. He gained admission to the Dominican convent at Bologna.

Sir Thomas Craig of Riccarton born in 1538, was the Scottish writer of feudal law. In 1573 he was appointed justice-depute of Scotland and in 1573 of Edinburgh. The arms for Craig were registered in Riccarton, Scotland 1818. The associated arms are to be found in Sir Bernard Burkes General Armory 1884. Ulster King of Arms 1884.

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NW Okie's Ramblings

Vol 12, Iss 38 Bayfield, Colorado - Okay! I guess Duchess told on me, huh? I am a day later than usual, but can you blame me for wanting to be outside in the Fall, cool rocky mountains, instead of in front of my laptop?

Save a spot on the Alva (Oklahoma) downtown square for us this coming Saturday morning. Will it be cool, cold, rainy or sunny?

Can not wait to see my 2010 paint filly while we are back in Northwest Oklahoma. Not to leave out visiting with my other horses, Nugget, Maggie, Cindy and Doquoti. Do not forget to turn down the thermometer this week and next, though.

I am going to keep this short! If you see Lovina and Bud Clark, tell them you hear Wagner's are visiting NW Oklahoma for the rest of September 2010.

I suppose I should give some reason for being "A day late and a dollar short," huh?

All day yesterday I got this idea to fix up a database to view my Paternal, Maternal and Husband's family ged files in our MySql, php database.

I found this PhpGedView open-source program that, if your webserver allows, lets you run a MySql database, you can use PhpGedView to configure your mysql database to read, search, edit and display your ged files and share with your family across the globe.

I am still in the process of uploading my ged files and setting up my family genealogy database, Paris Times Pioneers genealogy. I have the Paternal family tree uploaded and will be adding the Maternal and Wagner family genealogy later. I still need to fine tune some things yet, and will keep you updated when it is up and running. We shall see how well it works!

We hear that Texas around the Dallas area received at least 7/8 inches of rain and tornadoes. What part of that passed through to Tyler, Texas that sets about 90 miles East of Dallas along Interstate 40?

Thanks for you patience as we come to you a day later than usual! View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


NW Okie's Ramblings

Vol 12, Iss 37 Alva, Oklahoma - Where has the month of September gone. I know it is only reaching mid-way, but why do the days past so quickly?

Only a little over a week plus a few days until Northwestern OSU has their Fall Homecoming 2010. How many homecoming does this make for NWOSU (a.k.a NTN, NSTC, NSC)? 1899? I have lost track, but know that I have run across the first homecoming somewhere in my notes and research. Maybe someone out there reading this could enlighten all us Northwest Oklahomans.

In less than two weeks we will be stomp, clapping to the school bands marching around the Alva downtown square. The YouTube video was taken 1 November 2008 of the marching bands.



According to our research on Northwestern, in Volume II, Issue 81, dated 21 October 2000, titled "A Homecoming Mystery Bands, Floats & Celebrations," a celebration with floats in a great parade was being planned as far back as 1 July 1899. Was this the first homecoming? July 1, 1899 -- The work on the building of the famous Castle on the Hill had so advanced that a committee began the preparations for laying the corner stone under the main tower in front. The program consisted of the usual ceremonies, led by the Masons. Governor Barnes and several other territorial officers, and Grand Master E. M. Bamford were present. President Ament introduced Governor Barnes as the first speaker. He was followed by Judge McAtee, S. L. Johnson and Hon. Temple Houston.

The following is a list of articles that were placed within the corner stone -- Roll of officers and members of the grand lodge and local lodge A. F. & A. M.; same of the Alva Commercial Club; same of the legislature 1897; copies of the Alva Pioneer, Courier, Review and Cleo Cheiftain; copy of program of the day's exercises and names of President Ament, Miss Bosworth and Mrs. DeLisle.

The day was one of general celebration, the businesses of the town being represented by floats in a great parade. The crowd present was guessed at 4000 to 6000. Some More Normal History can be found on our website at this link Northwestern Normal School, 1895-1935 - beginning & conception

Barry Kelsey remembers, "We used to call it Northwestern State Teachers College. When my Grandfather went there it was called something like Northwestern Normal School."

Monet Monfort Lion says, "Yes, I believe it started out as Northwestern Normal School. I have many photos of The Castle on the Hill and a painted plate depiction made for Monfort Drug Store's China department! Rod reminds us that, "The original title of the institution was Northwestern Territorial Normal School, founded in 1897, 10 years before Oklahoma's statehood."

Marvin Henry says, "There are probably others who remember attending NSC while still in elementary school and jr high school. During the time Washington School was being rebuilt, about 1945, my 3rd grade class was held in the upstairs, first room on the left in what was known as Horace Mann building, now the education building. Junior High, 7th & 8th grade was on the second floor of the Horace Mann building. Industrial Arts (Shop for the boys) ground floor and Home Ec (girls) second floor of the Fine Arts building."

Off the subject of NWOSU and onto our family genealogy that I have at MyHeritage.com - Wagner genealogy, the subscription runs out around October 10, 2010, and I have decided not to renew that genealogy site. BUT it will not be a loss, because I have that information over at my Ancestry.com family genealogy for the Warwick, McGill, Paris, Conover, Hurt and Wagner families.

Until November 21, 2010 our Paris-McGill-Warwick family genealogy will still be up for awhile at MyHeritage for the Paris-Conover-Hurt-Warwick-Gwin-McGill-Wagner Family. I may or may not renew this site in November, 2010, because a more updated version is over at my Ancestry.com genealogy site. We shall see!

David, the two Pugs and myself are going to try to make it back for Northwestern's Homecoming. While there we need to check out our new little 2010 filly, black and white paint horse that grazes with her momma paint horse at Clark's East Farm, in Alfalfa County, Oklahoma. I hear it is a beauty!

Happy and Best Wishes to your September and Northwestern Homecoming 2010! View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


Immigrants Make Up America

Vol 12, Iss 27 America - With the talk of Independence Day, and this being the day after the 4th of July 2010, We ask you, "Aren't we all immigrants or Descendants of Immigrants?"

America is a land of immigrants and Native Americans. What would America be today if immigrants from all ver the world had not set foot on the eastern shores of the 13th Colonies, pushing the Native Americans westward onto reservations. Killing and slaughtering their buffalo beyond extinction?

What part did my migrating ancestors play in the westward movement of the Native Americans? I did some searching back through my family genealogy to figure out where each of my ancestral immigrants came.

We start with our paternal ancestors. The Warwick ancestors were English. The Gwyn/Gwin/Guinn were from Wales. The Hull/Hohl ancestors came from Rhineland Palatinate (Rheinland-Pfalz), Germany. The McGill's were Scottish from Scotland, migrating to Ireland and finally making their way to the America's.

Our maternal ancestors were the Conover (VanKouwenhoven), Dutch and settling in New Amsterdam (also known as New York, Flatlands). The Paris/Parris were English. The Hurt/Hurtosci were from Czechoslovakia (Bohemia), known also as Austria-Hungary. That brings us to our Great Grandmother, Anna Wallman (1863-1902), who married our Great Grandfather, Joseph P. Hurt, who migrated from Czechoslovakia around 1876. I do not know much about her because she died at the young age of 39 when she was struck by lightning in 1902.

I always thought that our Wallman ancestors were also from Czechoslovakia, but I found a 1880 U.S. Census that shows an Anna Wallman (born 1863, Russia) the daughter of Jacob Wallman (born 1833, Russia) and Maria (born in Russia). Could this be another Anna Wallman or could it be my Great Grandmother Anna Wallman Hurt?

The 1900 US Federal Census shows Joseph P, and Anna Wallman Hurt (born in Bohemia) and their family living in Bishop, Woods, Oklahoma Territory.

Great Grandmother Anna Wallman arrived in the USA around 1876 or 1877 through Bremen, Germany. At the young age of 16, Anna married Joseph P. Hurt, in Nebraska, about 1879. As I said earlier, Anna Wallman Hurt died in 1902, in Bishop, Woods, Oklahoma Territory, at age 39 when she was struck by lightning. She is buried in the Hurt family cemetery, on the Martin property, North of Chester and West of the Orion Cemetery.

That brings us to my husbands ancestors, which includes Wagner's from Germany.

Have you ever looked back to see where your ancestors originated? Let us know your ancestral makeup. Thanks! View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


July 4, 1928, Alva Drum Corp

Vol 12, Iss 26 Alva, Oklahoma - Coming up next Sunday is the 4th of July 2010. I know that I have showed this July 4th, 1928 Alva Drum corp photo before, but we thought it only appropriate to show what 1928 citizens of Alva and their boys drum corp were doing on July 4th, 1928.

I have recently put it up on NW Okie's Facebook Photos in the My Photos - Camera Vault Photos to share in case someone is looking, doing genealogy research and might see a relative in the 1928 July 4th photo. The photo gives you an idea of how Alvans used to park in the wide downtown streets around the square and in the center of the street.

Kathy mentioned, "Oh Wow! I recognize several names in this pic. Russell Fowitz was the son of William Fowitz, who bought my grandfather, Louis Miller, furniture store and undertaking business. Both were cousins of my grandfather. Louis and his wife, Blanche, raised William when his father and mother were killed in a flood back in Pennsylvania. William's sister, was adopted by a wealthy mattress manufacturing family, raised in Pennsylvania."

I have everyone tagged with a name in the photo, except the band leader out front. If you click the link above, it should take you over to NW Okie's Facebook photo album where you can put your pointing device on each boy and see their name.

Here is a list of Alva Boys in Alva Drum Corp, 4 July 1928, NW corner of Alva downtown square, NW Oklahoma.

Row 1, front to back: Bob Burcket, J. L. Reed, Russle Fowitz, Ben Harrover, Frank Houts, Richard Jones, Newton Gettings;

Row 2, front to back: Bob McGill, Herb Ryman, Howard Schumacher, Lester Duck, Paul Clark, Lewis Kasparick;

Row 3, front to back: Bob Day, Brad Eutsler, Jhon (sic) Day, Clay Noah, Tom Hewit, Junior Collins;

Row 4, front to back: Fat Murry, Earl Boyce, Joe Day, Bill Jackson, Marion Brozwell (?), Millard Porter;

Row 5, front to back: Warne Templin, John Jackson, Edward Kavnaugh, Crawford Batenburg, Merle (Gene) McGill, Ben Matteson, Bradley.
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1938 NSTC Ranger Album

Vol 12, Iss 3 We have been sharing a scanned copy of the 1938 Ranger Album with family genealogists for awhile and thought perhaps some others might be interested in downloading a PDF file of the 1938 Ranger Album. It is a large file. You can either open it up in your web browser and save a copy to your computer -- OR -- right click on the link and "save as" to a folder on your computer for further genealogy research.

Here is the link for those of you looking for a copy of the 1938 Ranger yearbook, Northwestern State Teacher's College, Alva, Oklahoma, I have scanned it into a PDF file. Contact Linda McGill Wagner at email: mcwagner.lk@gmail.com and I will send you a link to the pdf file if you are having trouble viewing it in your browser and can not figure out how to "save as" to your computer. -- 1938 Ranger yearbook.
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Fairmont, Marion County, WV

Vol 11, Iss 11 We found this unknown family photo in my Grandmother's treasure chest of genealogy photos. Why Grandma Contance Warwick McGill had it ... I do not know! The backside was dark and you could barely make "Palatine" scratched into the backside. The old photograph is one of those photographs you see on cardboard type photo-backing. When did they start and end doing photographs like that?

We did a Google search for Fairmont, WV and found some history of Fairmont, Marion County, WV.

Birdseye view of Fairmont-Palatine WV WV-Fairmont Map.

Here is some of what we found and you can read the rest of it on my Facebook site: "Fairmont is a city in Marion County, West Virginia, United States. It is the county seat of Marion County[3]. Established in 1820 as Middletown, then in Monongalia County, it was chartered by the Virginia General Assembly in 1843 as Fairmont, a contraction of "Fair Mountain."

Fairmont is located in the North-Central region of the state, along West Virginia's I-79 High Tech Corridor, about 18 miles southwest of Morgantown, and about 23 miles northeast of Clarksburg.

Fairmont State University, established in 1865, is located in Fairmont. The former head of the art department of the school, Luella Mundel, was the subject of a documentary called American Inquisition by Helen Whitney. Mundel was the victim of blacklisting during the McCarthy era, and the documentary showed how the negative effects of that era reached even smalltown West Virginia. This documentary was the subject of a very famous case about the First Amendment.[5]

Marion County was created by an act of the Virginia Assembly on January 14, 1842, from parts of Harrison and Monongalia counties. The county was named in honor of General Francis Marion (1732-1795), the legendary hero of the American Revolutionary War.

Oral history indicates that in 1808 Boaz Fleming made his annual trek to Clarksburg to pay his brother's Harrison County taxes. While in Clarksburg he attended a social gathering that included Dolly Madison, his cousin. He complained to her about having to travel over a hundred miles each year from his home to pay his Monongalia County taxes and his brother's Harrison County taxes.

Dolly Madison supposedly suggested that he create his own county to save him all that travel. Six years later, Boaz Fleming circulated a petition to do precisely that, naming the proposed county Madison County, in honor of Dolly and President James Madison.

The petition failed to gain sufficient support to be presented to the Virginia General Assembly. He then focused on creating a town near his farm. In 1819, a road was built from Clarksburg to Morgantown. His farm was about halfway between the two, making a good resting point.

He laid out the town on the west side of the Monongahela River in 1819. It was incorporated on January 19, 1820 as Middletown. It is unknown if the town was called Middletown because of its location mid-way between Clarksburg and Morgantown or because Boaz Fleming's first wife, Elizabeth Hutchinson, was originally from Middletown, Delaware.

Middletown was named newly-formed Marion County's first county seat on February 18, 1842. At that time, William Haymond, Jr. suggested that the town's name be changed to Fairmont because the town had a beautiful overlook of the Monongahela River, giving it a "fair mount." The Borough of Fairmont was incorporated in 1843 by the Virginia General Assembly.

In 1838, the town of Palatine was laid out on the east side of the Monongahela River, opposite Middletown. It was settled by Germans from the Palatinate States of southwestern Germany and they named the town after their homeland. It was incorporated in 1867. In 1899, Fairmont, Palatine, and neighboring West Fairmont were merged into a single city.

In 1865, a privately-owned normal school opened in Fairmont to train teachers that would be required to fill the state legislature's mandate of having free public schools in every county. In 1867, Fairmont Normal School was accepted as one of three normal schools owned and operated by the state of West Virginia. In 1917, the school was named Fairmont State Teachers College and is currently known as Fairmont State College.

In 1793, Jacob Paulsley built a home on the east side of the Monongahela River in present-day Fairmont. At that time, most of the future city was a dense, laurel thicket.

When Middletown was formed in 1820, its initial trustees were: John S. Barns, John W. Kelley, Josiah Wolcott, John W. Polsley, Jesse Ice, Benoni Fleming and Thomas Fleming. John S. Barnes served as mayor.
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Woods County, Oklahoma Territory (O.T.) - Newspaper Heritage

Vol 9, Iss 5 A few weeks ago we sent off to the Oklahoma Historical Society (OHS) (2401 North Laird Ave., OKC, OK 73105-7914, (405)-521-2491) for a newspaper genealogy report for Woods County, Oklahoma. Several years ago the OHS received a grant from the Library of Congress to do a genealogy of the newspapers across Oklahoma. Most of this Information is a part of that research.

It was set up into eight (8) Linked Groups and Individual Titles (papers). At one time there were both Daily & Weekly newspapers in Alva & Woods County, Oklahoma. Each of the aggressive newspapers taking a different political viewpoint, contributing to the development of Woods County through their articles, editorials while razzing their fellow editors, citizens for their political views.

If you go up to the NWOSU library on the Alva campus, in Alva, Oklahoma, you can browse over 8000 Alva newspapers that Blanche & Allen Doughty donated during the Summer of 1966 to the Historical Section of Northwestern State College. The newspapers include: Alva Review, Renfrew Record, Alva Record, Alva Daily Record from 1897 to 1941.

Woods County, OK - Newspaper Genealogy

Linked Group 1:

  • "Alva Daily News" -Alva, OK, daily paper, March 5, 1908 thru December 31, 1908, was absorbed by "Daily Review Courier," Alva, OK - daily, began in 1908.
  • "Morning Times" - Alva, OK, began April 7, 1912 thru November 21, 1914, published by Logan A. Wilhite and edited by Kent Eubanks. Eubanks was co-editor/publisher with Walter Rossin in 1907, at the Alva Courier. In 1908, Eubanks was co-editor/publisher with Harry Bardshaw on The Daily Times. The Morning Times competitor was the Alva Daily Pioneer. The Morning Times front pages were covered mostly with ads with a few leading stories while the inside pages were filled with stories about the community. It carried on a feud with the Alva Pioneer with Dave Woodson as the Morning Times mouth piece. absorbed by "Daily Review Courier."

  • Daily Editions:
  • "Daily Review Courier" - Alva, OK, daily, began in 1908, publication known as Daily Review Courier from August 25, 1919 thru March 27, 1920.
  • "Alva Daily Pioneer" - began June 24, 1901, published from July 25, 1903 thru April 9, 1906. [SEE Link Group 2]
  • "Daily Alva Review Courier" - Alva, OK, daily, March 29, 1920 thru January 17, 1925.
  • "Daily Review Courier" - Alva, OK, daily, January 21, 1925 thru April 22, 1929. September, 1929, merged with "Alva Review-Courier."
  • "Alva Review Courier" - Alva, OK, daily, April 23, 1929 thru June 4, 1989. October 1, 1985, the "Review Courier" used a 6-column format, standard advertising unit (SAU).
  • "Alva Review-Courier & Woods County News" - Alva, OK, daily, June 7, 1989 thru December 13, 1989. July, 1986, it changed from evening to morning paper, published Tuesday through Friday with a Sunday edition.
  • "Alva Review-Courier (ARC)" - Alva, OK, daily, December 17, 1989 thru present. Absorbed "Alva Advocate"; Absorbed "Newsgram (June 5, 1985). ARC has provided news coverage for northwest Oklahoma for over 115 years.

  • Weekly Editions:
  • "Alva Courier" - Alva, OK, weekly, began in 1896 (The First 100 Years of Alva, Oklahoma states it dates back to January 21, 1897); publication dates January 13, 1899 thru January 23, 1903.
  • "Alva Weekly Courier" - Alva, OK, weekly, January 30, 1903 thru January 24, 1908; merged with the "Alva Review" January 31, 1908, into "Alva Review Courier."
  • "Alva Courier Weekly" - Alva, OK, weekly, January 31, 1908; merged with "Alva Review" into "Alva Review Courier."
  • "Alva Review" - Alva, OK, weekly, July 7, 1894 thru February 6, 1908
  • "Alva Review Courier" - Alva, OK, weekly edition, published February 13, 1908 thru December 31, 1914, ceased publication.
  • "Alva Weekly News" - Alva, OK, merged with "Dacoma Herald"
  • "Dacoma Herald" - Dacoma, OK, merged with "Alva Weekly News" into "Woods County News"
  • "Woods County News" - Alva, OK, weekly, June 20, 1968 thru May 25, 1989.
Linked Group 2:
    Weekly Editions:
  • "Alva Pioneer" - Alva, OK, weekly, September 22, 1893 thru July 9, 1897; merged with "Alva Republican" into "Alva Pioneer Republican." It was the first newspaper in Alva, Woods County, Oklahoma Territory, September, 1893; W. F. Hatfield started gathering news, selling subscriptions with the assistance of Oscar Haberlein who worked at the Kiowa News in Kansas. The "Pioneer" was printed in Hazelton, Kansas, brought to Alva, O.T. and delivered to subscribers for the first 6 weeks. After that it was housed in the second story of the first two-story building (20x40 feet) built by Hatfield, around October, 1893, to house his press. The "Pioneer" was the oldest, daily Democratic paper in Woods County. It was published for 10 years in its two-story location and grew from a weekly to a daily paper. Downstairs below the "Pioneer" printing office was located a restaurant opened by G. W. Drake and his wife from the Hazelton, Kansas area.
  • "Alva Republican" - Alva, OK, weekly, purchased February 9, 1894 by James Kelley and J. I. Parcell, the first republican newspaper in Alva, O.T.; publication dates February 23, 1894 thru July 2, 1897; merged with "Alva Pioneer" into "Alva Pioneer Republican."
  • "Alva Pioneer Republican" - Alva, OK, weekly, July 16, 1897 thru December 24, 1897.
  • "Alva Pioneer" - Alva, OK, weekly, December 31, 1897 thru August 16, 1901.
  • "Alva Weekly Pioneer" - Alva, OK, weekly, August 23, 1901 thru August 27, 1909.
  • "Alva Pioneer" - Alva, OK, weekly, September 3, 1909 thru July 7, 1911, ceased publication.

  • Daily Editions:
  • "Alva Daily Pioneer" - Alva, OK, began June 24, 1901, publication dates July 25, 1903 thru April 9, 1906.
  • "Daily Pioneer" - Alva, OK, daily, January 14, 1911 thru April 30, 1917.
  • "Alva Daily Pioneer" - Alva, OK, daily, publication dates April 28, 1917 thru April 23, 1919. Absorbed by "Daily Review Courier" (SEE Linked Group 1).
Linked Group 3:
  • "Ames Enterprise" - Hoyle, OK, weekly (Major county), November 15, 1901 thru July 4, 1902.
  • "Renfrews Record" - Alva, OK, weekly, July 24, 1902 thru February 25, 1921. Founded by by James P. Renfrew, as a weekly in the five hundred block of Barnes Avenue
  • "Alva Record" - Alva, OK, weekly, February 21, 1921 thru February 26, 1931. Allen Doughty bought "Renfrew Record" from Timmons & Finch of Cherokee, Oklahoma and changed it to "Alva Record." In 1930, it was printed as a daily; changing to "Alva Daily Record."
  • "Alva Daily Record" - Alva, OK, daily, March 3, 1931 thru December 31, 1940; located in the 600 block of Barnes Avenue. In 1941, Doughty sold the it to Joe McBride and Jim Nance. Nance & McBride bought the "Review-Courier"; merging it with the "Alva Daily Record."
  • "Alva Weekly Record" - Alva, OK, weekly, September 19, 1946 thru September 4, 1947.
Linked Group 4:
  • "Woods County Enterprise" - Waynoka, OK, November 2, 1900 thru June 6, 1935.
  • "Woods County Enterprise & Waynoka News" - Waynoka, OK, June 13, 1935 thru April 12, 1984.
  • "Woods County Enterprise" - Waynoka, OK, April 19 thru Present.
Linked Group 5:
  • "Woods County Socialist" - Alva, OK, October 29, 1910 thru November 26, 1910.
  • "Constructive Socilaist" - Alva, OK, August 2, 1911 thru April 23, 1913.
Linked Group 6:
  • "Waynoka Tribune" - Waynoka OK, February 5, 1909 thru February 16, 1912.
  • "Waynoka Democrat" - Waynoka, OK, February 22, 1912 thru October 16, 1914.
Linked Group 7:
  • "Woods County News" - Augusta, OK, August 5, 1899 thru October 25, 1907.
  • "Alfalfa County News" - Carmen, OK, November 1, 1907 thru November 22, 1912. Absorbed by "Carmen Headlight."
Linked Group 8:
  • "Dacoma Enterprise" - Dacoma, OK, weekly, may 3, 1912 thru November 9, 1917.
  • "Dacoma Mascot" - Dacoma, OK, weekly, November 15, 1917 thru June 24, 1920.
Individual Titles (Papers):
  • "Alva Chronicle" - Alva, OK, December 22, 1893 thru August 2, 1895. It was the first paper in Alva, O.T.; The First 100 years of Alva, Oklahoma states that, "L. B. Wilson brought it September 21, 1893 from Crisfield, Kansas; Hatfield purchased the Alva Chronicle and merged it with the Pioneer."
  • "Avard Tribune" - Avard, OK, June 2, 1904 thru July 26, 1918.
  • "Capron Hustler" - Capron, OK, June 16, 1904 thru May 25, 1916.
  • "Dacoma News" - Dacoma, OK, February 19, 1909 thru January 27, 1911.
  • "Daily Pioneer" - Alva, OK, January 14, 1911 thru April 30, 1917.
  • "Freedom Booster" - Freedom, OK, October 19, 1916 thru May 23, 1918.
  • "Freedom Call" - Freedom, OK, May 21, 1906 thru November 26, 1914.
  • "Freedom Express" - Freedom, OK, May 21, 1906 thru November 26, 1914.
  • "Prohibition Agitator" - Alva, OK, march 21, 1906 thru June 13, 1906.
  • "Sun" - Dacoma, OK, October 28, 1904 thru June 2, 1905.
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Pendleton County, (West) Virginia - Slavery In Pendleton

Vol 14, Iss 36 Pendleton County, W VA - To get started again with more genealogy and history of Pendleton county, West Virginia, we continue with chapter thirteen, of the History of Pendleton County, West Virginia, by Oren Frederick Morton, concerning "Slavery In Pendleton."

But . . . Before we begin, here is some news clips for those searching for Raerton and Probst ancestry from Pendleton county, Virginia, concerning information we found in The Evening bulletin, dated Thursday, November 29, 1888, published in Maysville, Kentucky -- "A novel wedding occurred a day or two ago on the Pendleton county, West Virginia, and Virginia line. The parties were Mr. John Raerton, of Highland county, Virginia, and Mrs. Martha Probst, of Pendleton county, West Virginia. The Rev. G. Collins, the minister in the case, not having license in Pendleton, stood on the line of the two counties, while high-contracting parties stood in Pendleton county and were made man and wife in the presence of a large crowd of people."

We find through historical books that the Appalachian highland was seldom adapted to large farming operations. In early times the access to an outside market was far more inconvenient than in the lowland South.The Scotch-Irish and the German settlers of this mountain land were not in a class favorable to slavery. Most of the religious sects among the Germans were decidedly opposed to it. West of the Blue Ridge, slavery never had the foothold it possessed east of the mountains.

In 1756 there were 40 black tithables in Augusta,indicating a slave population of not more than 1/20th of the whole. Runaways appeared to have been of frequent occurrence. yet slavery grew more rapidly than the general increase. In 1779 Rockingham had 165 colored tithables, 1/9th of the inhabitants being negroes. The capitation list for Pendleton in 1790 mentioned only three colored tithables, these being the property of Francis Evick.

In 1834 there were 280 slaves. In 1850 there were 322 slaves and 31 free colored, a total of 353. This was considered 6% of the entire population. The same date nearly or quite coincides wight he high water mark of the negro race in Pendleton.

If this county were destitute of river bottom and of large and smooth areas of fertile upland, the number of slaves would have been exceedingly small. But the river bottoms with their adaptability to large and profitable farming gave a conspicuous advantage to those fortunate persons who owned these lands. The geographic condition quickly created a class of prosperous river-valley farmers, who under the industrial ideas of a former day were not slow to resort to slave labor. Yet very few became slaveholders on anything like a large scale, and few of the hill farmers followed their example.

This geographic condition helped greatly to accustom the people of the county to the mode of social and political thought which was prevalent east of the Blue Ridge. This had an important bearing on the attitude of Pendleton during the crisis of the civil war.

The old laws relative to negro lawbreakers were severe, yet not without reason. The slave had not the forethought, the initiative, nor the self-restraint which the white man had acquired through centuries of effort. He was a savage by instinct and heredity. Force was the one argument he could comprehend, and he expected it to be applied swiftly and vigorously. Lemency led only to a loss of respect toward those in authority over him. We find that the negro who stole a horse or a hog was hanged. In 1779 a slave of Rockingham who killed a man was ordered hanged and his head set on a pole.

The early records of Pendleton contain considerable mention of negro crime. In 1810 a negro felon was branded in the hand and returned to his master. In 1811 negro Stevens was tried for plotting to kill, but was discharged. In 1812 negro Daniel was branded in the hand for stealing a calico habit and a piece of muslin. In 1823 negro Lucy was sold for the amount of jail fees, of which she was the occasion.

In the same year a negro named Ben stabbed John Davis. He was ordered burnt in the hand, given ten lashes on the bare bace well laid on, and remanded to jail subject to the order of his master. The most serious crime was in 1843, when a girl named Maria, the slave of William McCoy, fatally stabbed a negro youth belonging to John McClure. The tragedy occurred in Franklin near the house recently torn down by John McCoy. Her trial took place in December. She was reprieved and sent South.

Sometimes the salve was the occasion of lawbreaking on the part of the white man. In 1811 two men in the southwest of the county were tried for stealing a wench, but were discharged. In 1859 a resident of the North Fork was jailed for giving a pass to a negro, though not convicted. In the same year another man committed a felony by helping three negroes to get away.

The colonial records of Augusta tell us the age of a slave child was passed upon by the county court and ordered certified in the records. The whereabouts and the doings of the slave were kept under scrutiny, and his liberty of movement was very much restricted. If a slave left his master's premises without a pass, any person might bring him before justice, who at his option might order a whipping; or for every such offense he might be given ten lashes by the landowner upon whom he had trespassed. He might not carry a gun except by the permit of a justice. If he gave false testimony, each ear might by turn be nailed to the pillory and afterwards cut off, in addition to his receiving 39 lashes at the whipping post. The law of 1851 forbade the sale of poisons to negroes. For any slave or free negro to prepare, exhibit, or administer any medicine whatsoever, was a felony punishable by death, unless there were no ill intent or result. He might not give medicine even in his own family without the consent of his master.

It was before 1776 the slave was real estate in the eye of the law. After that date he was regarded as personal property. The person with at least 1/4th of negro blood, there was a large and increasing number of such, was counted as a mulatto.

Toward the period of the civil war, there were few whippings in Pendleton in consequence of the disfavor with which the institution was generally regarded. The non-slaveholder found his chief grievance against slavery to lie in the too great petting which he thought the slave received, and which he found to make him impudent. The dates of slave births were recorded in the family bible, though on the fly-leaves. With the master's consent the slave might be baptized. When the estate was settled up, the slaves were divided among the heirs, a single salve being sometimes held in plural ownership. The small amount of slaveholding thus became much diffused. Perhaps the largest holder in the earlier years of the county was Daniel Capito. On the settling of his estate in 1828, the 12 slaves were sold at auction for $2511.50. The capitation tax on a slave was 44 cents in 1800, and $1.20 in 1860.

Sometimes the freeing of a slave at a certain age was mentioned in a will. Nichola Harper provided that his slave Lydia be set free when she was 30, if she behaved herself, and that her child Polly be free at the age of 21. Sometimes there was a proviso that a slave be freed at a certain age, "should the law permit." More emancipating would have been done, but for the embarrassing status of the freed negro. So long as slavery remained in force it was not desirable that such persons be numerous. They continued in a certain degree to be the wards of their former owners who were thus in a measure responsible for their conduct. If the negro were under 21, or over 45, or of unsound mind, he was supported by the estate of the former owner.

The constitution of 1851 required the registering of the freedmen every five years. In the registry were mentioned age, color, and identifying marks. A copy of the paper was given to the freedman. A county court might then grant him permission to live within its jurisdiction during good behavior. Sometimes the application was refused. Such a refusal was put up against Elizabeth Dice in 1850.

In 1845 the petition of the negro Randall was overruled, but two years later it was accepted. The freedman might not carry a gun without a license, and if he worked in another county, his certificate had to be registered there. He could not himself hold salves except by descent. If over 21 and a male, or under 18 and a female, there ws permission to choose a master. Removal front he state forfeited a certificate, andy he free negro of another state was forbidden entrance into Virginia.

The behavior of a negro, whether salve or free, was naturally the measure of the tolerant feeling extended toward him. It is said of a free negro named Hayes, who in the early years of the nineteenth century lived on a mountain northeast of Ruddle, that his boys and girls were by general consent allied to attend the same school with the white children. The war of 1861 overthrew the institution which Henry A. Wise denounced as a blight on the economic development of the South, that repressed inventive talent, paralyzed Saxon energy, and left hidden the South's commercial resources. The slaves and freedmen of 1860 were to be found in most neighborhoods of the county. Soon after the close of the war they had mostly disappeared. In the valleys of the South Fork and the North Fork there were none at all, with perhaps a solitary exception in Circleville district.

The continuance of a desire for black labor on the part of some of the residents of the county seat led to the rise of a settlement of colored people a mile south of Franklin. The settlement was known locally as "Africa." I contained about 70 persons, a number of whom were immigrants from other counties. The only other group of colored people was composed of a few families on the west side of the Blackthorn valley, and was known as Moatstown. These people were never slaves. The negro element in Pendleton,e specially that of Moatstown, who'd a large admixture of white blood. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


Grace Ward Smith

Vol 12, Iss 43 Alva, Oklahoma - As seen in the image on the left that I found on Ancestry.com for Grace Ward Smith, this 1920 U.S. Federal census shows the Harry C. & Florence Ward family of five living in Alva, Woods county, Oklahoma at the residence of 507 Choctaw Street.

Harry C. Ward was listed as 43 years of age, born in Ohio; Florence, his wife, 38 years of age, born in Indiana. They had three children: John (16 years, born about 1904, in Oklahoma), Grace (8 years, born about 1912, in Oklahoma) and Louis (6 years, born about 1914, in Oklahoma).

I sent a copy of the 1920 U.S. census to Tracy and she replied, "That is them! I even looked up the address. When I was 14 years old my dad (Billy Ward Smith) and I lived in that house for about 6 months. She (Grace) never told me she grew up in that house! Thank you so much!

Tracy also said, "Awesome! I have been on line trying to find genealogy and history about that side of my family. I found her parents names but no birth or death certificates. I would love to find some photos or family members who have photos, information going back farther. Graces' son, my dad, Bill Smith died 1988 at age 45. My brother Steve lives in Oregon with his wife and 2 daughters. I live in Florida with my son who is 6. Any recommendations as to where to search online? Thanks so much for responding to me."

This is what NW Okie has accumulated so far concerning Grace Ward Smith and her legacy in Northwest Oklahoma as reported in The OkieLegacy Ezine, Vol. 9, Iss. 39, 2007-09-28. We asked our readers who was Grace Ward Smith? Many of you northwest Oklahomans might remember her as an attractive brunette, secretary-manager of the Alva Chamber of Commerce back in 1958. Others remembered her as a first cousin and other might remember her run for Alva Mayor and loosing by 6 votes.

Grace had a dream for Woods County in Northwest Oklahoma. It was to make Woods County a tourist attraction. It was also about this time that Grace brought camels to the Little Sahara south of Waynoka, Oklahoma.

The feature on Grace Ward Smith and Waynoka camels stated, "It was prior to April, 1958 tour that Grace Ward Smith arranged through the Alva Chamber for purchase of a pair of camels from the Al G. Kelly-Miller Brothers Circus, Hugo, Oklahoma. One of the camels was named Nellie and gave birth at Waynoka's Little Sahara.

"The dromedary (single hump) cost $1,300, and a double hump camel cost $1,000. both were females, and were quartered through the past winter at Oklahoma City's Lincoln Park zoo.

"Members of the Waynoka Saddle Club raised $200 to fetch the animals back to Woods county, and they were kept at the "Little Sahara's" oasis pasture, three miles south of Waynoka. Feed was donated by ranchers residing in the area."

It was also about this time that Alva moved to have 10 acres of sand dunes set aside as a state park. Lute Murrow, Dacoma legislator from Woods county, and Ben Easterly, Alva state senator for Woodward and Woods counties, had promised legislation toward this end.

April 19, 1959 -- Grace Ward Smith was quoted in The Oklahoman, article concerning the invasion of the Sheiks' of Waynoka and Camels that roam the sand dunes as attraction for second year of special tours to Northwestern Oklahoma. Mrs. Smith stated, "I can foresee Alva as the starter city for one of the largest tourist businesses in the nation. One day, air-conditioned buses will leave Alva on schedule to take visitors on a swing through our country."

Grace Ward Smith Resigns Chamber of Commerce, October 19, 1960. On October 19, 1960, the Alva Chamber received notice of Grace Ward Smith's resignation to Phil Ruch, chamber president, effective November 15, 1960. It seems that Alva was loosing this Grace Ward Smith, go-getter, energetic secretary-manager of the Alva Chamber of Commerce to Elk City, Oklahoma. Grace accepted a similar post at Elk City, where the chamber recently lost its manager to Enid, Oklahoma.

Ruch expressed his regret at the loss, but assured Grace Ward Smith that her Alva colleagues would not wish to hamper her advancement. Grace was also treasurer of the US 281 Association. Grace also promoted construction of a new chamber building in Alva and the educational fun tours that brought more than 2,000 school children to Woods county in 1958 & 1959.

We also found on Ancestry.com the Russell Family Tree that shows Grace Ward & Ray Williams Smith and their son, Billy Ward Smith. Is this the same as the Grace Ward Smith from Alva, Woods county, Oklahoma?

If anyone remembers Grace Ward Smith, Tracy (Smith) Preston's grandmother, Tracy would love to hear from you. Tracy says that her grandmother once once ran for mayor of Alva, Oklahoma and lost by only 6 votes. If you have pictures or stories or documents, Tracy would love to hear from you. You can contact her at the following EMAIL: TracyAmazon@hotmail.com. View/Write Comments (count 3)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


ParisTimes Genealogy Feedback

Vol 12, Iss 27 Kim wrote and says, "My name is Kim and I'm writing to pay compliments to your web page: a href="http://paristimes.com/genealogy/genealgy.html">ParisTimes Genealogy. It has really useful information on genealogy. Inam a student teacher so I am definitely going to incorporate some of this into an upcoming lesson plan.

Since your page was a big help, I thought Iwould pass along a similar page you might want to use as a resource: Big List of Genealogy Links It has a nice compilation of information on genealogy and family trees you might find useful. Thanks again for the help." View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


How Far Does the OkieLegacy Reach

Vol 6, Iss 39 How Far Does the OkieLegacy Reach -

North Central Idaho - "I enjoy Okie Legacy in North Central Idaho. I don't have any connections in your area, being born in Wichita Falls TX and having connections to Ardmore OK, but I enjoy reading about your area and share your views on politics. Keep it coming."

Cherokee, OK - "I am in Cherokee but I am betting that the Qatar correspondent is my nephew, Wayne Guffy, Jr. I really enjoy your newsletter and have been able to help several with genealogy questions. Keep up the good work."

Topeka, Kansas - "I started getting Okie Legacy in OKC a year ago and now live in Topeka, Kansas and still getting it.  It's helped me several times. Great job."

Duncan, OK - "That is great that you are hearing from Qatar... I'm in Duncan, Stephens Co., Oklahoma."

McKinney, TX - "Messages reach me ever few days here in dusty McKinney, Texas, U.S.A. (30 miles north of Big D.)"

Houma , Louisiana - "Since I already subscribe, you well know of me."

Coldwater, Kansas - "I receive Okie Legacy here in nearby (as the crow flies) Coldwater, Kansas."

Tulsa, OK - "Having grown up in Alva, I've lived in Guthrie, Pauls Valley, Blackwell, Enid, Salt Lake City, Utah and now Tulsa since I left Goldbug Central."

Odessa, TX - "We are sure that we are not in the running for fartherest reader, but wanted you to know how much we have enjoyed your newsletter. I grew up in Alva, my husband grew up in Waynoka and we enjoy hearing news about the 'old timers.' We have lived in Odessa, Texas since 1962, but have a second home in Waynoka, Oklahoma, plus farm land in Major and Woods counties."

Las Vegas, NV - "We are in Las Vegas, Nevada."

Amarillo, TX - "Glad to respond to REACH-OUT, as I appreciate the Okie Legacies so much, however I am only 250 miles away in Amarillo, Texas."

San Jose, California - "I'm continuing to enjoy your weekly letters. I appreciate your keeping my photos on your site. I have actually heard from some fellow cadets through your good work. There are probably not too many of us around anymore since we were in Alva in the Spring of 1944. One of my fellow air cadets sent me some pictures from the airfield where we went through our first flight training. By the way, I haven't tracked down Mary Holten. It would be nice if she would access your site and see the picture of us in '44. I am a widower now, so it's OK. Another item from '44 is that we cadets were receiving our dental work from dentists stationed at the prison camp down the road apiece. In my case you are reaching out to San Jose, CA, just about 40 miles south of San Francisco. I look forward to your weekly letters. Thanks." Tom McCarrick - Email: ttmc21@aol.com

Woodward, OK -
"PLEASE KEEP IT GOING."

Cleveland, OH - "Been a reader of yours for sometime now.  Like the newsletter a lot.  Live outside of Cleveland, OH.  Love it here but love coming back now and then to visit with my brother outside of Alva, OK."

Southern California - "You reach me out in Southern California. I hail from Coyle, OK., Logan County. I really look forward to reading your newsletters. Makes me feel closer to home."

Victoria, British Coumbia, Canada - "How far? I live in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. My sister lives in Japan and I am sending her the site to so she can see it."

Greenville, SC - "I live in Greenville, SC. I am originally from Georgia and my wife is a native of Oklahoma, therefore, my interest in your very good newsletter. Thank you for sending it along."

Other Places - Summerville, GA; Selma, California; Cherokee, OK; Lakewood, CA; Vacaville, CA; Aspen, Colorado.

Olympia, Washington - "Hi Linda & Duchess Rose, We're in Olympia, Washington. I found your website originally a couple years ago when I was doing genealogical research over the internet. I went through GOOGLE and that's how I found you!" View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


1909 Memorial Day

Vol 17, Iss 16 New York - It was on the front page of the New York Tribune, dated Sunday, 30 May 1909, the headlines read: "Memorial Day this year finds sixteen veterans of the civil war still on the active list of U. S. army officers."

The thirteen pictured in the article were:

  • 1.) Col. E. E.. Wood, professor of Modern Languages, West Point.
  • 2.) Col. Edgar S. Dudley, Judge Advocate and head of Law Department, West Point.
  • 3.) Brigadier Gen. Charles Morton, Commander of the Department of the Missouri.
  • 4.) Brigadier Gen. William L. Marshall, Chief of Engineers.
  • 5.) Col. O. J. Sweet, 28th Infantry.
  • 6.) Col. John L. Clem, Assistant Quartermaster General, San Antonio, Texas.
  • 7.) Lt. Col. W. W. Robinson, Jr., Deputy Quartermaster General, stationed at Chicago.
  • 8.) Maj. General John F. Weston, Commander of the Department of California.
  • 9.) Maj. E. O. Fechet, Signal Corps, Boston.
  • 10.) Col. J. N. Allison, Chief Commissary department of the East, Governor's Island.
  • 11.) Brigadier General George B. DAvis, Judge Advocate General.
  • 12.) Lt. General Arthur MacArthur.
  • 13.) Brigadier Gen. Earl D. Thomas, Commander of the Department of the Colorado.

The others not pictured were Brigadier General Charles L. Hodges, and Brigadier General Daniel H. Brush, who were in the Philippines and Captain D. W. Arnold, who was in Japan. It also mentioned that had Major Charles S. Walkley been born four days later he also would have been included in the group. Captain Arnold had retired on the 26th day of May 1909.

Brief sketches of their careers, together with announcements of Memorial Day celebrations tomorrow would be found in another part of The Tribune dated on this day, 30 May 1909.

For those doing their genealogy research and see a familiar surname, click the link above to search through this tribune.
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Old Memories Dusted Off

Vol 15, Iss 8 Oklahoma - We received this Pleasant Valley Souvenir booklet back in 2002, and we are re-submitting it to our OkieLegacy database for those doing genealogy research of their Oklahoma ancestors.

One of our readers said, "I have scanned a Souvenir booklet from my grandmother Almira Ames and great-aunt Ruby Ames. I'm not certain as the location of this school, but suspect it was east of Capron in Alfalfa County as most of the other information I have refers to being east of Capron.

Back in 2002, past references to Beegle Drug, located in Alva, Oklahoma had prompted some recall back then from another reader, "Beginning at the Northwest corner of the square and going east, Kent Johnson Insurance, a restaurant, Firestone Store, Warricks Shoes, Fredericks Studio, Fuson Carpet, Beegle Drug.

"West of the Central National Bank, I believe one of your early postcards shows an alleyway then the post office. The building that was a post office at one time was a barbershop and the location of Fred Neuman's original music store. Fred lived upstairs, and had a rehearsal hall for his boys choir.

"From the Southwest corner of the square was the Palace Barber Shop, Stites Electric, Ritz Theatre, Hester Drug, this became Holder-Southern Drug. My main memory of all the Drug Stores: Monfort's, Schumacher's, Beegle's, and Hester's was the medicinal/chemical smell and the marble soda-fountains where you could get the most delicious fountain drinks, sodas, cherry Cokes, malts." View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


Southern Historical Magazine - August, 1892

Vol 14, Iss 40 Virginia - [Photo on the left are portraits of Jacob Warwick and his wife, Mary Vance.] -- We received a pdf file from Gerald McLaughlin concerning some history of our WARWICK Ancestry in Virginia. It (the PDF file) comes from of the Southern Historical Magazine, published by Virgil Lewis, Charles, W. Virginia, August, 1892, Vol. II, No. 2,and devoted to history, biography, genealogy, archaeology and kindred subjects that was issued monthly.

Pioneer History - Jacob Warwick & Mary Vance

These sketches were compiled by Rev. W. T. Price largely from information from John Warwick, Esq.; Judge James W. Warwick and Mrs. Elizabeth McLaughlin. The gentlemen were grandsons of Jacob Warwick, and Mrs. McLaughlin was a daughter of William Sharp, who lived with Mrs. Warwick at intervals as a friend and visitor, and for whom Mrs. Warwick manifested special attachment.

We find from reading this 1892 Southern Historical Magazine that the father of Jacob Warwick came to Augusta county, from Williamsburg, Virginia, during colonial times, between 1740-50. He was a Lieutenant in the service of the British Crown, employed in surveying and location land grants in Augusta county, which included territory of which States have since been formed. Lt. Warwick located and occupied the Dunmore property for his own use. He married Elizabeth Dunlap, near Middlebrook. Lt. Warwick was one of the English gentry whose families settled in Virginia in consequence of political reverses in England, and whose history was graphically given in Thackeray's Virginians.

Price's piece on "Pioneer History" showed that Lt. Warwick and his wife, Elizabeth, had four children: Charles, Elizabeth, Jacob and John. It was after operating extensively in lands, securing the Dunmore property in his own name, that Lieut. Warwick concluded to visit England. Lt. Warwick made arrangements for his absence, sent Charles and Elizabeth to Williamsburg to be educated, while Jacob and John remained with their mother in Augusta county. Lt. Warwick never returned from England and was never heard of no more, given up for dead. In other articles that I have found, Lt. Warwick died at sea crossing the ocean to England.

When it was decided that Lieutenant Warwick was dead, the grandfather of David Bell,of Fishersville, Virginia, was appointed guardian of the children, Jacob and John. William and James Bell were the sons of this guardian. James Bell was the father of William A. Bell and David Bell was well remembered citizen of Augusta county.

Meanwhile, Elizabeth Warwick settled on the Dunmore property, securing it by deed to Jacob, and afterwards married Robert Sitlington. Elizabeth remained at Dunmore a number of years after her second marriage.

Jacob Warwick remembered very little of his own father, and always cherished the highest filial regard for Robert Sitlington. When Jacob attained his majority, Mr. Sitlington moved to his own property near Old Millboro, the estate occupied in 1891 by Mrs. Dickinson, daughter of the late Andrew Sitlington, Esq.

When Jacob Warwick reached the legal age, coming into possession of his estate, he married and settled at Dunmore.

Dunmore was Jacob Warwick's first home after his marriage. His wife, Mary Vance, daughter of Col. John Vance, of North Carolina. Jacob died on Back Creek, at Mountain Grove, BAth county, Virginia. Col. John Vance's family moved to the vicinity of Vanceburg, Kentucky, except for Samuel Vance, Mrs. Warwick and Mrs. Hamilton. The last named was the mother of Rachel Terrell of the Warm Springs, and Esq. John Hamilton of Bath county. Governor Vance, of Ohio, and Senator Zeb Vance, of North Carolina, were of the same family connection. The Vances were originally from Opecquon, near Winchester, Virginia.

In business trips to Richmond, to sell horses or cattle, Jacob Warwick formed the acquaintance of Daniel Warwick, a commission merchant, who attended to business for Jacob Warwick, and became mutually interested and were able to trace a common ancestry. This merchant was an ancestor of Senator John W. Daniel, the renowned eulogist of Lee and Davis.

Jacob Warwick remained at Dunmore a number of years. His children were all born there. he was industriously and successfully occupied in accumulating lands, and managing immense herds of cattle and droves of horses. His possessions on Jackson's River were purchased from a certain Alexander Hall, of North Carolina. Mr. Hall owned from the Byrd place to Judge Warwick's. One of his sons, being charged with horse theft, the penalty being death by hanging, refugees to Bath. The elder Hall came to Dunmore to see Jacob Warwick, and proposed to sell his land to provide means to send his refugee son to Kentucky so as to elude arrest. Judge Jacob Warwick had sent out one hundred head of cattle to be wintered in the cane brakes. This herd was taken by Hall as part payment for the Jackson river lands.

The Clover Lick property was rented from the Lewises. The accounts form Kentucky were so flattering that Jacob Warwick decided to settle there. He actually set out for the purpose of locating and securing a place for a new home. The persons in advance of the party with which he was going were slain by Indians near Sewell Mountain. When Jacob Warwick and those with him came up and saw their slain friends, all returned home. Mrs. Warwick thereupon became so unwilling to emigrate from her Pocahontas home, that her husband concluded to exchange his Kentucky possessions with on Alexander Dunlap for a portion of the Clover Lick lands.

The Dunlap patent called for four hundred acres, the actual survey made six hundred. There was a suit between Leis and Dunlap about this possession. When matters as to these lands became satisfactorily arranged, Jacob Warwick moved to Clover lick, and lived in a row of cabins. After a few years, he and Mrs. Warwick thought it might be better for their children to live not he Jackson river estate. They moved to Bath, remaining there until the marriage of their son Andrew.

Upon Jacob and Mary's rerun to Clover Lick the log cabins were deemed unfit for occupancy, and arrangements were made to build a spacious mansion. Patrick Bruffey was employed to prepare the material. He began work in Warwick's absence. Mrs. Warwick instructed Bruffey to hew the timbers so as to have a hall or passage, as it was then termed. When Mr. wArwick returned and found what had been done, he was not pleased with his wife's plans, and had the logs changed accordingly. Mr. Bruffey hewed the logs and dressed the plank, but did not build the chimneys. Mr. Wooddell, near Green Bank, furnished the plank for sixty pounds. The nails were forged by hand at the Warm Springs.

Several mounds had been discovered near Clover Lick. Searching for material for the foundation of the large new house, the builders authored some nice stones from a rock pile. They found human remains, and when Jacob Warwick heard of it, he emphatically ordered the stones to be replaced and told them not to molest anything that looked like a burial place. There was no traces of the Shawnee or Mingo Indians ever wintering in the limits of this county. It was thought and regarded by them as a summer resort for fish and game, and to escape the diseases peculiar to malarial regions east and west.

Greenbrier Ben often spoke of the opening of a grave just in front of the Chapel, and from the superior quality of the articles found with the remains, all were of the opinion it was the tomb of a chief. Jacob Warwick directed it to be carefully closed,a nd the relics were not molested.

The main objects in having the new house so spacious, was that it might be used for preaching services, and there was preaching there more frequently than anywhere else in this region, during a number of years. This historic mansion was finally removed to give place to the handsome residence reared by Dr. Ligon, and which was burned in 1884.

We also find that the main route for emigration from Maryland, Pennsylvania and other points north and northeast passed by Clover lick to Kentucky and Ohio. As many as forty and fifty would be entertained overnight. This made Clover Lick one of the most public and widely known places in the whole country. The approach from the east avoided hollows and ravines, keeping along high loins and crests of ridges so as to be more secure from ambuscades and Indian attacks.

The original way out fromClover lick, going east, after crossing the Greenbrier, near the mouth of Clover creek, avoided Laurel Run, kept along the high point leading down to the river, and passed close by the McCutchen residence. Mary Warwick hadthe first road cut out, up the Laurel Run, in order to bring the lumber for the new house from Mr. Wooddell's in the Pine Woods, now Green Bank and vicinity. Mrs. WArwick gave the enterprise hwer personal attention.

A number of interesting incidents were given by tradition, illustrating the character of Mary Warwick. While renting Clover Lick, her husband and others were making hay. A shower of rain came up very suddenly and dampened their guns and horse pistols. Late in the afternoon the men fired them off, so as to load them with fresh charges. Some on hearing the report of firearms in quick succession, brought word to Mary Warwick, at Dunmore, that the Indians were fighting the men at the Lick. Mrs. Warwick at once mounted a large black stallion, put a colored boy on behind, and went at full speed and swam the swollen river in her effort to see what had happened. This colored boy was old "Ben," who died at Clover Lick, and was remembered by many of the older citizens.

Upon another occasion, when the Shawnees were returning from one of their raids to the east, forty or fifty of their warriors were sent by Clover Lick with the intention, it was believed, to pillage and burn. A scout from Millboro warned Judge Warwick of their movements. With about 20 others he waited for them in ambush on the mountain crest, south of Clover Lick. The fire was very effective and every man killed or wounded his victim. The Indians in their surprise hastily retreated and were pursued as far a Elk Water in Randolph county. Upon hearing the result, Mrs. Warwick at once followed her husband and friends, and was attended by servants, carrying provisions for them. She met them at the Big Spring on their return, and the weary hungry party were greatly refreshed by her thoughtful preparations.

Mrs. Warwick was eminently pious, and was a member of the Windy cove Presbyterian Church. She never felt herself more honored than when ministers would visit her home and preach. The visiting minister would receive a nice horse, or something else as valuable, as a token of appreciation. She was conscientiously rigid in her domestic discipline. Her brother once made this remark, "Mary, I used to think you were too strict with your family, and you have been blamed for it. I see now, you were right. You have not a child but would kneel in the dust before you, to obey you. I let my children have more liberties, and they do not care near so much for me."

Rev. Arelas Loomis came from Beverly, for a time, every four weeks, and reached at the Warwick residence. Mrs. Warwick was highly emotional and during the services often appeared very happy. As to her personal appearance, she was tall, slender and blue-eyed, hair slightly tinged with auburn, and when in health, lithe and agile in her carriage. So she was distinguished for symmetry of person, beauty of figure and force of character, all of which she retained even to an advanced age. She was very benevolent, and her kind deeds were done upon the principle of not telling the left hand what the right might be doing. persons in her employ would always be overpaid. Polly Brown, whose lot it was to support her blind mother, received two bushels of corn every two weeks, and no one knew where the supply came from at the time. A person named Charley Collins, who was renowned as an athlete, and whose name was given to one of the Meadows of Clover Lick, did a great deal of clearing. It was reported that he was but poorly paid, but before Mrs. Warwick was done with him, his family was doubly paid by the substantial gifts dispensed with her open hands.

Among Mrs. Warwick's many other generous deeds, it was told how a rather worthless character, disabled by frozen feet, was received into her house, clothed and fed until he could walk. His name was Bosier. Mrs. Mclaughlin remembers seeing this person crawling up the steps, sitting by the door or reclining under the dining table while preaching services were held. This man afterwards died front he effects of a burring tree falling on him, against which he had made a fire, while on his way from Big Spring to Mace's in Mingo Flats. George See, a grandson of Mrs. Warwick, heard his cries and came to him. In his efforts to rescue him, he exerted himself so laboriously that he was never well afterwards.

Mrs. Warwick, in her old age, gathered the first Sabbath school ever taught in Pocahontas county, West Virginia. In the summer her servants would lift her on her horse, and she would then ride about four miles to a school house, near where the Josiah Friel cabin stood, which was later in the possession of Giles Sharp. The exercises would begin at about nine o'clock. There was no prayer, no singing, but she would read the bible, talk a great deal and give good advice. The scholars would read their bibles with her. The exercises would close at two in the afternoon. After a continuous session of five hours, Mrs. Warwick would be so exhausted as to require assistance to arise and mount her horse. It was her custom to go to Wm. Sharp's, dine and rest awhile, and then go home late in the day. Among her scholars were Mrs. Mary Gibson, on Elk; Mrs. William Moore and Mrs. Elizabeth McLaughlin, who were daughters of her friend, Mrs. William Sharp. The school was mainly made up of Josiah Brown's family, john Sharp's, William Sharp's and Jeremiah Friel's families.

A great while before her death, during on of Mr. Loomis' ministerial visits, she received the communion. Upon receiving the elements, her emotions became so great that her husband and children, fearing results, carried her to her own room. For four weeks, she was helpless from nervous post ration. All her children from Bath and Pocahontas were sent for. She died at the ripe age of 80 years, in 1823, at Clover Lick, and there she was buried. There were no services of any kind in connection with her burial. Mary Warwick's grave was on the green hillside, facing the morning sun. The only thing marking the spot at one time, was a peach tree that had spontaneously grown at the head of her grave. Her blood flows in the veins of the Warwicks, Sees, Gatewoods, Camerons, Poages, Beards, Matthews, Moffats, McClungs, Ligons, McClintics and Prices, in the counties of Randolph, Bath, Rockbridge and Pocahontas.

Jacob Warwick was one of the pioneers who made permanent settlements in that is now Pocahontas and bAth counties Virginia and West Virfinia. he resided on cover Lick for a time, before moving to his immense possessions on Jackson's river, and then returned to Clover Lick. He endowed his seven children with ample legacies and besides bequeathed a competency to ten or fifteen grandchildren.

Jacob Warwick was an alert and successful Indian fighter, having a series of conflicts, narrowly escaping with his life won several occasions. yet he was never sure of killing but one Indian. There is a tree on the lands of John Warwick, near Green Bank, where Jacob Warwick killed an Indian in single contest. It always grieved him that he had certainly sent on soul into eternity under such sad circumstances.

It was his accurate knowledge of mountain regions far and near his serves were in frequent demand by land agents and governmental surveyors. Jacob and others went to Randolph as an escort for a land commission in the service of the colony. It was during the period when Killbuck scouted the mountains with bands of Shawnees and Mingoes. Colonel John Stuart, of Greenbrier, said, "Of all the Indians the Shawnees were the most bloody and terrible, holding all other men - Indians as well as whites - in contempt as warriors in comparison with themselves. This opinion made them more fierce and restless than any other savages, and they boasted that they had killed ten times as many white men as any othe tribe. They were a well-formed, ingenious, active people; were assuming and imperious in the presence of others, not of their nation, and sometimes very cruel. It was chiefly the Shawnees that cut off the British under General Braddock, in 1755 - only nineteen years before the battle of Point Pleasant - when the General himself and Sir Peter Hackett, the second in command, were both slain, and the mere remnant only of the whale army escaped. They, too, defeated Major Grant and the Scotch Highlanders, at Fort Pitt, in 1758, where the whole of the troops were killed or taken prisoners."

The most memorable event of Jacob Warwick's life was his being in the expedition to Point Pleasant, under General Andrew Lewis. The march from Lewisburg to Point Pleasant, one hundred and sixty miles, took nineteen days. It was most probable that Jacob was in the company commanded by Captain Mathews. This conflict wight eh Indians was the most decisive that had yet occurred. it was fought on Monday morning, October 10, 1874.

As mentioned earlier, major Warwick's sons and daughters were all born at Dunmore, Pocahontas county, West Virginia. The eldest daughter, Rachel, remembered when the settlers would fly to the fort near her home, when she was a little girl. The fort was near the spot occupied by Col. Pritchard's mill in 1892. Rachel Warwick became the wife of Major Charles Cameron, a descendant of the Camerons noted in the history of the Scottish Covenanters.

Charles Cameron was in the battle of Point Pleasant, and was there called upon to mourn the death of his three brothers slain in that conflict. Charles Cameron was of medium stature, tidy in his dress, wore short clothes, very dignified in his manners, and was never known to smile after the heart-rending scenes he witnessed at Point Pleasant, Tuesday, Oct. 11, 1774. He was a Major in the Revolution and served as clerk of both courts of Bath county many years.

In person, Jacob WArwick was tall, stoop shouldered and exceedingly agile and muscular. Mrs. Mary Vance Warwick was a person of highly refined taste, and took all possible pains to make home attractive. After sunday school at her home all present were invited to remain for dinners. Her table service was elegant enough for a prince to enjoy. She had a well supplied library of books in the nicest style of binding, and she made good use of them.

Jacob Warwick was so genial in his manners, keenly enjoyed the society of relatives and friends, among whom he numbered many of the noblest spirits of Virginia. Jacob never seemed to be conscious of his wealth or superior intelligence, and consequently never assumed airs of superiority. When persons called him Major, it seemed to displease him, and he would remonstrate, "Don't call me Major, I am nothing but Jake Warwick."

Jacob "Jake" Warwick was jovial in his disposition, extremely fond of innocent merriment. He delighted much in the society of young people, even children. His pleasant words and kindly deeds to young people were vividly and affectionately remembered by all who ever knew him.

After the decease of his wife, Mary Vance, most of his time was passed at the home of Major Charles Cameron. Jacob died at the breakfast table, when he was merrily twitting Miss Phoebe Woods about her beau, young Mr. Beale, January, 1826, when Jacob was nearing his 83rd year. Jacob was buried about a mile up the west bank of the Jackson's River, reserved for family burial. A locust tree stood near his grave and marked the place. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


Highland County Virginia - Exploration Of...

Vol 14, Iss 8 Highland County, Virginia - Exploration beyond the mountains is where our next journey takes us in discovering the lands of our ancestry that settled in the Pastures and Valley of Virginia. This is our discovery of Highland County, Virginia where our Gwin, Hohl (Hull), Kincaid and Warwick settled after they they took the journey across the Atlantic Ocean for religious and economic persecution back in the "Old" country back home.

We will begin with Governor Alexander Spottswood of Virginia in 1716 deeming it important to learn the truth regarding this land beyond the Blue Ridge mountains that he supposed lead to only a few days march to the Great Lakes. Spottswood was not impelled by curiosity or far-sightedness, though. It was the land hunger which impelled the American step by step to the Pacific that was making itself felt. It was the pillaging of the Tidewater soil had begun to counsel a decisive exploration beyond the mountains.

Governor Spottswood left the capital with a mounted party of 50 companions following no road the greater part of the distance. It took him from August 20, until September 5, 1716 to cover a distance of 220 miles. The Spottswood party encountered many rattlesnakes while climbing the Blue Ridge mountains through Swift Run Gap. On the summit they found trees blazed by the Indians. Spottswood and his party descended to near where Elkton now stands as they reached a fine river which they named "Euphrates. They crossed to the left bank and held a banquet the next day, September 6, 1716. To chronicler the expedition it is careful to enumerate the considerable variety of wines and liquors which had been brought along. Each toast was followed with a volley from their firearms.

BUT . . . Governor Spottswood and the "gentlemen" of the party did not go any farther. Some rangers were left behind to prosecute the exploration. At the disbanding at Williamsburg, after an absence of eight weeks, the governor took steps to present each of his companions with a miniature horseshoe of gold containing the Latin motto, Sic juvat transcend ere montes Translated it is, So let it be a joy to pass over the mountains.

It was not the swilling of liquor or the presentation of badges that were the results of the expedition, though. They instead found a highly inviting region. On the mountains they crossed and on those they saw in the blue distance were noble forests. Between was a broad, grassy prairie with a more fertile, homelike soil than that of Tidewater. The wilderness was abound with game and fish, and there was no Indian village within a hundred miles. The land beyond the mountains was now officially and practically discovered and attractive reports of the same were soon circulating in Europe. In 1720 another county was formed and named Spottsylvania, in honor of the governor and took in the locality he visited.

The governor declared that his chief purpose was to assure himself that it was practicable to reach the Great Lakes. According to Indian reports they could be seen from the mountains in the distance. Surprising as it was Spottswood did not push on to those mountains to see for himself, instead he merely wrote in his official recommendation that settlements be established on the Lakes and communication secured by means of a chain of forts. In any cue, it was the passing through meadow of tall grass to look for another where the grass might be a bit taller. Spottswood was good even though it came to nothing. Other men were more practical than Spottswood.

The exploration of the great Valley of Virginia and the minor valleys beyond were tolerably rapid. By 1727 the Cowpasture Valley had been prospected, and a year or two earlier a Dutch trader by the a name of John Vanmeter has ascended the South branch as far as the vicinity of Franklin. Another Dutch explorer, John Vanderpool, discovered the gap which bears his name, and told of a beautiful valley beyond with impassable mountains in the distance. While hunters and rangers were prospecting this land of promise, a new wave of immigration was setting in, destined within a half century to supply the colonies with at least a fifth of their whole population.

In 1732, George Washington was born and the Scotch-Irsih and the Germans had only begun to float across the Atlantic. six hundred thousand people already were in the lowlands of Virginia and had nowhere penetrated the Alleghany watershed.

Some of the Scotch-Irish arrived at Charleston and went direct to the Carolina uplands. The greater share of the immigrants of both nationalities came to Philadelphia, because of the reputation of the Pennsylvania colony for its civil and religious liberty. The district along the Delaware River and westward toward the mouth of the Susquehanna was quite well occupied by a substantial class of English Quakers. The people already here looked with distrust on the stance appearing immigrants from Ireland and Germany. These newcomers that were not bound to servitude had therefore pushed inland through the zone of settlement.

The earlier colonists did not receive the new immigrants with wide open arms, they liked the Scotch-Irish the less of the two because of their assertive manner. Restrictive laws were accordingly passed. The Germans were required to adopt English names, which appears to explain the s=wholly English form of the surnames of not a few of the German pioneers.

Many of the newcomers made only a short stay i Pennsylvania. They moved to the southwest, because in this direction lay the door of wider opportunity. The Germans, lovers of peace and on the whole the less aggressive of the two races, remained in Pennsylvania and occupied the inland districts as far as the western rim of the Cumberland Valley. The overflow pushed through that valley into the adjacent section of Maryland, across the Potomac into the valleys of the Shenandoah and the South Branch (then known as the Wappacomac).

The Germans occupied the west side of the Shenandoah Valley as far southward as the vicinity of Harrisonburg. In the valley of the south Branch, the attempt of Lord Fairfax to make his extensive grant a feudal barony of the English pattern caused many of the immigration to push above Fairfax boundary, which lay in the vicinity of Moorefield and Petersburg.

The Scotch-Irish we find were more numerous and more venturesome and their area of their distribution was much wider. They occupied the western section of Pennsylvania, and filled the Valley of Virginia southward of the German district. They also filled the Valley of East Tennessee, but they took possession of the uplands of both the Carolinas. They became a frontier community, which extended from the vicinity of the Great Lakes southward into Georgia. Their development of this frontier was quite rapid and greatly hastened the westward advance of the American people.

The Scotch-Irish pathfinders were particularly fixed on that section of the Valley of Virginia which lies southward of Massanutton Mountain. They occupied this region in force. Their earlier selections were not int he smooth, open plain between the mountains. Why was it they should appear to scorn fettle lands that needed no clearing? Their motive was substantially the same as that which led the earlier settlers beyond the Missouri to shun the open prairie and ling to the creek bank, where drinking water had only be be dipped out of a spring and where timber was at hand for shelter and fuel. The limestone plain in the valley was deficient in surface water. The Scotch-Irishman did not shirk at the trouble of felling trees, but he had no mind to dig a deep well if he could help it.

In 1727, a year before the first permanent settlement in Rockingham, and five years before there was anybody at or near where the city of Staunton grew up, we find an attempt to colonize the Cowpasture Valley. It was in that same year that Robert and William Lewis, Willaiam Lynn, Robert Brooke, and Beverley Robinson petitioned the Gvoernor and Council to with the following:

  • "Your Petitioners have been at great trouble and charges in making discoveries of lands among the mountains, and are desirous of taking up some of those lands they have discovered; wherefore your petitioners humbly gray your Honours to grant him an order to take up fifty thousand acres, in one or more tracts, on the head branches of James River to the West and Northwestward of the Cow Pasture, on seating thereon one Family for every thousand acres, and as the said lands are very remote and lying among the great North Mountains, being about two hundred miles at least from any landing -- Your petitioners humbly pray Your Honours will grant them six year' time to seat the same."

  • This is where we find in the very same year when the first actual settler came to the Shenandoah Valley, there was an earnest effort to colonize the Highland area. This was only 120 years after the landing at Jamestown, when the entire population of the Colonies did not equal the present number of people int he city of Baltimore. BUT . . . was the above petition sever granted? It is doubtful, but in 1743 there was an order of council in favor of Henry Robinson, James Wood and Thomas and Andrew Lewis, for 30,000 acres in the same region.

    There were considerable number of Scotch-Irish in the upper Shenandoah Valley by this time and even southward. In 1738, the region west of the Blue Ridge had been set off into the counties of Augusta and Frederick, with the line between the two crossing the Shenandoah Valley in the vicinity of Woodstock. The county machinery of Augusta was not set in motion until the close of 1745. It was during this interval that Augusta remained attached to the parent county of Orange.

    We find that the Augusta colony was the starting point of the Scotch-Irish settlement of upper Virginia. The dispersion from this center was governed by the position of the gaps in the mountains. Pioneer travel never climbed a steep rocky ridge when it was possible to find a grade line along a crooked watercourse.The settlers did not go over the rugged Shenandoah Mountain as they moved westward into Bath and Highland, but they flanked it by way of Panther Gap, 30 miles southwest of Staunton.

    Highland was settled by the Scotch-Irish land seekers coming through Panther Gap and along the upper James, moving up the valleys of the Cowpasture and Jackson's River, until they reached the laurel thickets along the cross rigs separating the waters of the james from those of the Potomac. The German land seekers cam from the opposite direction as they crept up the three valleys of the South branch waters until they had come to the divide. Likes attracted likes in the settlement of a new region. Pioneers of the same class preferred to be together.The Scothc-Irish and the German settlers were not like oil and water, but in communities of either the other was in some degree represented.

    In the pioneer days of Highland we find these two defined areas of settlement. The Scotch-Irish filling the vie valleys which opened southward and the Germans occupying Straight Creek and the Crabbottom. A few of them made homes south of the divide, with a larger number of the Scotch-Irish settling north of it. When Pendleton county was established in 1787, its southern line folioed this water-parting. It was not only a natural geographic boundary, but it was also a boundary between tow provinces of settlement. Pendleton was predominantly German. Bath would soon be sticker off and was distinctly Scotch-Irish.

    In the valleys of the Cowpasture, the Bullpasture, Jackson's River, and Back Creek, the family names were mainly Scotch-Irish. In the Crabbottom and in Straight Creek, family lineage was mainly German but thoroughly Americanized. There had been much blending of the two. Some families not German innate had become almost German in blood, while the present generation of the German immigrant cannot point back to an unmixed German ancestry. Northeast of Highland the divide passes very near the county boundary. Crossing into Pendleton one finds a large number of the people using a broken down German idiom. South of the divide it is an unknown speech never having much foothold.

    Besides families coming from the east of Virginia, some even came from the distant New England. We find that Welsh, French and Celtic and saxon irish scattered freely though out all the colonies, without seeking to found distinct settlements of their own. The venturesome Hollanders of the New York colony were not quite unrepresented. The actual beginnings of settlements in the counties of Highland and Bath show the latter county lying directly against the gateways to the Valley of Virginia. The settlement of BAth was a bit earlier than that of Highland. The Cowpasture valley was first reached and first settled, while the valley of Back Creek came last, just as we might suppose. The German influx did not reach the divide as soon as the Scotch-Irish. There were people at the head of the Bullpasture 15 years before there appears to have been any in Crabbottom.

    The Calf Pasture Valley lies eastward across the mouth of panther Gap, and it was supposed that settlement would be a little earlier than in the valleys beyond. It was on Arpil 2, 1745, when deeds for 2,247 acres were given by James Patton and John Lewis to William Campbell, Jacob Clemens, Samuel Hodge, Robert Gay, Thomas Gillam and William Jamison.

    August 17, 1745, other deeds for 5,205 acres were given by the same men to Francis DONALLY, Robert GWIN, Robert BRATTON, John DUNLAP, Loftus PULLIN, John WILSON, John KINCAID, John MILLER, Robert GAY and James CARTER. Almost all these names occur shortly afterward in Bath or Highland, though purchaser himself or a son. Of those names I see many that connect to my paternal ancestry. Such as GWIN, BRATTON, DUNLAP, KINCAID and GAY. [Click the following link for more information on my pioneer ancestry at Paris Pioneers Genealogy. Is there anyone out there researching their ancestry roots of Highland county, Virginia that have you ever come across any of the miniature, inscribed, "gold horseshoes that Governor Spottswood handed out to his travel companions that we mentioned earlier in this article?

    On the South Fork in Pendleton we have knowledge that number of German families, to whom deeds were given on one and the same day, had been living on their lands ten years and in recognized occupancy, yet the lands had already passed into private ownership.There was no record any permit for those persons to settle, though. The authorization would seem to have been verbal and for a definite term of years. The country beyond the Shenandoah ridge and above the confluence of the Cowpasture with Jackson's River, we find that in 1744 a survey of 176 acres a was granted to one William Moor on the last named stream and in what is now Alleghany county. The following year ten other persons took surveys on the Cowpasture below Williamsville.

    In 1746, nineteen more surveys were recorded for the lower Cowpasture, thirteen for Jackson's River, and five for Back Creek. All these appear to be below the Highland line. How long these people had been here, we do not know with any certainty. John Lewis was directed by the Orange court, May 23, 1745, to take the list of tithables for the district between the Blue Ridge and the North (Shenandoah) Mountains, "Including the Cow and Calf Pastures and the settlers back of the same." It is not conclusive that any settlers had actually gone beyond the Cowpasture. The order was worded so as to include all settlers, however far to the west they might be found. Aside front he report of the county surveyor, there seems to be no evidence that people had located west of Shenandoah Mountain prior to the coming of Moor in 1744, or perhaps 1743.

    The order of council in favor of the LEWIS and their associates was granted in 1743. Adam DICKENSON's Fort stood four miles below Millboro and appears to have been the leader of the settlers on the lower Cowpasture. Dickenson was a large landholder and on the organization of Augusta in 1745 he became one of its first justices.

  • Colonel John Lewis,of Scottich-Welsh descent, came from Ireland and lived two miles east of Staunton. He died in 1762 at the gage of 84. All Lewis sons were prominent in the early history of Augusta.
  • Colonel James Patton was the rich manor the Augusta settlement and said to have made 25 voyages across the Atlantic, bringing immigrants every time. He was also county lieutenant and fell in battle in 1755.
  • Gabriel JAMES was a Welshman and first resident lawyer, being appointed prosecuting attorney when only 22 years old. He lived near Port Republic but owned land in Bath. He was brother-in-law to Thomas Lewis, and both these men were members of the state convention that considered the Federal Constitution and they voted in favor of its adoption.
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    Martyn of Galway, Ireland

    Vol 6, Iss 46 Louisiana - "Thanks for passing on the email from the Martyn in Galway.  As I told you Hugh Martin's parents were both from Galway.  Somehow, although I know the name of Hugh of Alva's grandfather, and where in Galway he lived, I've never 'jumped the pond' in my genealogy research on this line.  Time flies - no kidding.  I will soon contact him. Incidentally, I don't seem to have received your ezine the last couple of weeks. Regards." -- Charlie View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Old Anadarko Telephones: 1st 107 Years

    Vol 12, Iss 7 Dale Talkington (Email: daletalkington@gmail.com) says, "This is your last call to loan copies of early Anadarko phone directories for our forthcoming book of some 1,200 pages.

    Bound copies will be given to area libraries and genealogy societies. A copy will be on www.books.google.com where every word will be indexed and immediately searchable for free.

    So far we have 29 directories from 1903 up to our cut off date of 1960. These are a good cross-section of early Anadarko life, but we would welcome any other directories you might have to fill in the gaps.

    Here's what we would like to have: 1904 to 1907, 1909, 1911 to 1926, 1928, 1930, 1931, 1933, 1934, 1937, 1949, 1951, and 1954.

    We will give you a donation credit line along with Sandy Yount Adams, Robin Willis, Bruce Britt, Roy Pfleeger, R.L. Lawrence, E.T. Cook, C.Ross Hume, Jim Thompson, and Bill Welge.

    Check your attic and become forever FAMOUS. THANKS!"
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    Genealogy Searching

    Vol 11, Iss 10 Erika says, "I have a suggestion for another link to add to your Genealogy page ParisTimes Genealogy. I think is a pretty good genealogy article with lots of resources that I think fits well on your page: Genealogy on the Web. ?Thanks so much for taking the time to read my email. ? Have a great day." View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Katie (DeWitt) James 1905 Murder

    Vol 9, Iss 36 "For those of you into Genealogy... Mrs. Katie (DeWitt) James was the daughter of Henry DeWitt. After reading this old news story of 1905, I was wondering what happened to the Katie James' small child that got dropped off at the German farmer's home?

    Did Katie (DeWitt) James' father, Henry DeWitt, raise the child? Did Katie's husband raise the child? Was the child a Boy? Girl?

    Checking back further through the news archives, we gathered more information concerning Katie James Murder.

    In The Oklahoman, dated between July 29 thru August 31, 1905, there was mention that the child was a girl.

    * Mrs. Katie (DeWitt) James was allegedly murdered near Weatherford, Oklahoma, July 8, 1905.
    * Mrs. James left behind a baby girl, 13 months old that Mrs. Fannie (Ham) Norton allegedly dropped off at a German farmers home near Weatherford, Oklahoma.
    * Katie James husband was a hackdriver in Clinton, OK and a Custer County farmer.
    * July 29, 1905 Mrs. Norton was last seen with Katie James and baby.
    *Fannie (Ham) Norton killed herself with Strychnine shortly after she was arrested for the alleged murder of Mrs. James.
    * August 8, 1905 Gov. Ferguson puts out a $399 reward for conviction of murderer of Mrs. Katie James."

    Below are a few more articles I found in The Oklahoman that I have tried to put in chronological order.

    * July 29, 1905, pg. 2, headlines read: Killed Herself, Woman Arrested At Shawnee Was Evidently Prepared For Death. Was charged With Murder. Supposed to have killed Mrs. James Near Anadarko on July 8 - Body of Mrs. James Has Not Been Found.

    Shawnee, O.T., July 28, 1905 -- "Mrs. Harry Norton, alias Ham, arrested here at noon today by detective Sam Bartell of Oklahoma City for the alleged murder of Mrs. Katie James near Weatherford on July 8 committed suicide while in the office at Police headquarters. She took poison while in a toilet room a moment alone and died at 3 o'clock.

    Mrs. James with her small babe and Mrs. Norton drove from Weatherford on July 8 (1905) and Mrs. Norton returned alone coming to Shawnee the next day. The detective found Mrs. James baby at the home of a family near Weatherford unharmed but its clothing covered with blood. Mrs. Norton refused to admit that she committed the crime.

    In company with Harry Dewitt, father of Mrs. Katie James, who is supposed to have been murdered near Weatherford, Oklah., on July 8 (1905) and for which crime Mrs. Harry Norton was arrested here, Detective Sam Bartell left this morning for Weatherford where search will be made for the body of Mrs. James, whom the detective and others now are certain is dead. The fact that the detective found Mrs. James' thirteen months old girl, who accompanied Mrs. James and Mrs. Norton on a drive from Wetherford on the fatal morning at the home of a German farmer near Weatherford, the child's clothes being bloody though she herself was uninjured, leads the officers to believe that the body of Mrs. James will be found close by.

    Mrs. Norton's body is being held by Coroner Fleming until he hears further from Mr. Bartell.

    * August 8, 1905, pg. 3, headlines reads: Reward of $300. Governor Offers This for Conviction of Mrs. James' Murderer. Is An Unusual Mystery. Woman is supposed to have been murdered, but even that fact has not been established - Reward Conditional.

    Guthrie, Okla., Aug. 7, 1905 -- "A reward of $300 was offered by Governor Ferguson in behalf of the territory this morning for the arrest and conviction of the person or persons who murdered Mrs. Katie James near Weatherford on July 8, (1905). The case of the disappearance of Mrs. James is one of the most mysterious in the history of crime in Oklahoma. While the evidence tends to show Mrs. James was murdered, the murder has never been established to a certainty.

    A Week ago Mrs. Fanny Norton was arrested in Shawnee and charged with her murder. She would make no statement and was placed in a cell until the excitement had worn away. The officers felt sure, if she was not guilty, that they would bring forth from her a confession which would unravel the mystery.

    Before the woman had been alone more than a few minutes she was found dead, having committed suicide by swallowing strychnine.

    By some her suicide was looked upon as a confession of quilt, but circumstances have, in the opinion of officers, shown differently. It is believed she was implicated in the affair and could have told had she not killed herself.

    Every effort has been made to find the missing woman. Her baby, wearing bloody garments has been found in the home of a farmer near Weatherford. It had been left there by a woman corresponding to the description of Mrs. Norton. Mrs. James' father, in company with officers, have been looking for a trace of the missing woman, but thus far all attempts have failed. It is hoped by them that she was only kidnapped. The reward by the Territory will not hold good in a case of kidnapping."

    * September 19, 1905, pg. 5, headlines read: Claims Norton Reward.

    "Sheriff Garrison and Deputy sheriff Bartell went to Guthrie last night for a conference with Gov. Ferguson relative to the reqard offered by the territory for the arrest and conviction of Fannie Norton, alias Ham, murdress of Mrs. Katy James, and who was captured by Deputy Sheriff Bartell, following the murder.

    Mr. Bartell carried with him a petition signed by one hundred and fifty or more citizens of Weatherford and also the members of the coroner's jury, declaring that it was through the efforts of Deputy Bartell that the woman was arrested and expressing the belief That the reward is due him."
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    Pioneer History - Hurt Genealogy & History

    Vol 16, Iss 12 KY - Doing a research on the surname HURT, we find it was an English name with several possible origins. It could come from the Middle English HERT and Old English HEOROT, meaning stag, in which case it originated as a nickname for a swift runner.

    Alternatively, it could be derived from the Middle High German word HURT, meaning woven fence or hurdle, given to people who lived near such a fence. HURT family history is first recorded with one Aelfric HORT (an alternate spelling), who lived in Hampshire in 1060. The HURT family motto (mane prcedam, vespere spoilum) means game in the morning and a feast at night.

    HURT Family History

    The following is an interesting HURT family history copied from Rollin HURT's notebook written in the year of 1907 by him and loaned to Ruby Taylor in 1962 by Mrs. Ralph HURT.

    I find no known connection to this HURT family history and NW Okie's Maternal HURT ancestor being a part of this Rollin's HURT family history.

    NW Okie's HURT's were from Dubina, Caslav County, Austria-Hungary (Czechoslovakia), coming over to America in 1874, and settling in Nebraska, Oklahoma. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Pioneer History, Jacob Warwick & Mary Vance

    Vol 16, Iss 11 Clover Lick, WV - We may have included this in an early OkieLegacy Ezine Issue, but will resubmit, just in case some WARWICK ancestry and researchers are interested. It is taken from the Southern Historical Magazine - August, 1892. Vol 14, Iss 40 Virginia - It is a pdf file from Gerald McLaughlin concerning some history of the WARWICK Ancestry in Virginia. The PDF file comes from the Southern Historical Magazine, published by Virgil Lewis, Charles, W. Virginia, August, 1892, Vol. II, No. 2, and devoted to history, biography, genealogy, archaeology and kindred subjects that was issued monthly.

    Pioneer History - Jacob Warwick & Mary Vance>

    These sketches were compiled by Rev. W. T. Price largely from information from John Warwick, Esq.; Judge James W. Warwick and Mrs. Elizabeth McLaughlin. The gentlemen were grandsons of Jacob Warwick, and Mrs. McLaughlin was a daughter of William Sharp, who lived with Mrs. Warwick at intervals as a friend and visitor, and for whom Mrs. Warwick manifested special attachment.

    We find from reading this 1892 Southern Historical Magazine that the father of Jacob Warwick came to Augusta county, from Williamsburg, Virginia, during colonial times, between 1740-50. He was a Lieutenant in the service of the British Crown, employed in surveying and location land grants in Augusta county, which included territory of which States have since been formed. Lt. Warwick located and occupied the Dunmore property for his own use. He married Elizabeth Dunlap, near Middlebrook. Lt. Warwick was one of the English gentry whose families settled in Virginia in consequence of political reverses in England, and whose history was graphically given in Thackeray's Virginians.

    Price's piece on Pioneer History showed that Lt. Warwick and his wife, Elizabeth, had four children: Charles, Elizabeth, Jacob and John. It was after operating extensively in lands, securing the Dunmore property in his own name, that Lieut. Warwick concluded to visit England. Lt. Warwick made arrangements for his absence, sent Charles and Elizabeth to Williamsburg to be educated, while Jacob and John remained with their mother in Augusta county. Lt. Warwick never returned from England and was never heard of no more, given up for dead. In other articles that I have found, Lt. Warwick died at sea crossing the ocean to England.

    When it was decided that Lieutenant Warwick was dead, the grandfather of David Bell,of Fishersville, Virginia, was appointed guardian of the children, Jacob and John. William and James Bell were the sons of this guardian. James Bell was the father of William A. Bell and David Bell was well remembered citizen of Augusta county.

    Meanwhile, Elizabeth Warwick settled on the Dunmore property, securing it by deed to Jacob, and afterwards married Robert Sitlington. Elizabeth remained at Dunmore a number of years after her second marriage.

    Jacob Warwick remembered very little of his own father, and always cherished the highest filial regard for Robert Sitlington. When Jacob attained his majority, Mr. Sitlington moved to his own property near Old Millboro, the estate occupied in 1891 by Mrs. Dickinson, daughter of the late Andrew Sitlington, Esq.

    When Jacob Warwick reached the legal age, coming into possession of his estate, he married and settled at Dunmore.

    Dunmore was Jacob Warwick's first home after his marriage. His wife, Mary Vance, daughter of Col. John Vance, of North Carolina. Jacob died on Back Creek, at Mountain Grove, Bath county, Virginia. Col. John Vance's family moved to the vicinity of Vanceburg, Kentucky, except for Samuel Vance, Mrs. Warwick and Mrs. Hamilton. The last named was the mother of Rachel Terrell of the Warm Springs, and Esq. John Hamilton of Bath county. Governor Vance, of Ohio, and Senator Zeb Vance, of North Carolina, were of the same family connection. The Vances were originally from Opecquon, near Winchester, Virginia.

    In business trips to Richmond, to sell horses or cattle, Jacob Warwick formed the acquaintance of Daniel Warwick, a commission merchant, who attended to business for Jacob Warwick, and became mutually interested and were able to trace a common ancestry. This merchant was an ancestor of Senator John W. Daniel, the renowned eulogist of Lee and Davis.

    Jacob Warwick remained at Dunmore a number of years. His children were all born there. He was industriously and successfully occupied in accumulating lands, and managing immense herds of cattle and droves of horses. His possessions on Jackson's River were purchased from a certain Alexander Hall, of North Carolina. Mr. Hall owned from the Byrd place to Judge Warwick's. One of his sons, being charged with horse theft, the penalty being death by hanging, refugees to Bath. The elder Hall came to Dunmore to see Jacob Warwick, and proposed to sell his land to provide means to send his refugee son to Kentucky so as to elude arrest. Judge Jacob Warwick had sent out one hundred head of cattle to be wintered in the cane brakes. This herd was taken by Hall as part payment for the Jackson river lands.

    The Clover Lick property was rented from the Lewises. The accounts from Kentucky were so flattering that Jacob Warwick decided to settle there. He actually set out for the purpose of locating and securing a place for a new home. The persons in advance of the party with which he was going were slain by Indians near Sewell Mountain. When Jacob Warwick and those with him came up and saw their slain friends, all returned home. Mrs. Warwick thereupon became so unwilling to emigrate from her Pocahontas home, that her husband concluded to exchange his Kentucky possessions with on Alexander Dunlap for a portion of the Clover Lick lands.

    The Dunlap patent called for four hundred acres, the actual survey made six hundred. There was a suit between Lewis and Dunlap about this possession. When matters as to these lands became satisfactorily arranged, Jacob Warwick moved to Clover lick, and lived in a row of cabins. After a few years, he and Mrs. Warwick thought it might be better for their children to live not on the Jackson river estate. They moved to Bath, remaining there until the marriage of their son Andrew.

    Upon Jacob and Mary's rerun to Clover Lick the log cabins were deemed unfit for occupancy, and arrangements were made to build a spacious mansion. Patrick Bruffey was employed to prepare the material. He began work in Warwick's absence. Mrs. Warwick instructed Bruffey to hew the timbers so as to have a hall or passage, as it was then termed. When Mr. Warwick returned and found what had been done, he was not pleased with his wife's plans, and had the logs changed accordingly. Mr. Bruffey hewed the logs and dressed the plank, but did not build the chimneys. Mr. Wooddell, near Green Bank, furnished the plank for sixty pounds. The nails were forged by hand at the Warm Springs.

    Several mounds had been discovered near Clover Lick. Searching for material for the foundation of the large new house, the builders authored some nice stones from a rock pile. They found human remains, and when Jacob Warwick heard of it, he emphatically ordered the stones to be replaced and told them not to molest anything that looked like a burial place. There was no traces of the Shawnee or Mingo Indians ever wintering in the limits of this county. It was thought and regarded by them as a summer resort for fish and game, and to escape the diseases peculiar to malarial regions east and west.

    Greenbrier Ben often spoke of the opening of a grave just in front of the Chapel, and from the superior quality of the articles found with the remains, all were of the opinion it was the tomb of a chief. Jacob Warwick directed it to be carefully closed, and the relics were not molested.

    The main objects in having the new house so spacious, was that it might be used for preaching services, and there was preaching there more frequently than anywhere else in this region, during a number of years. This historic mansion was finally removed to give place to the handsome residence reared by Dr. Ligon, and which was burned in 1884.

    We also find that the main route for emigration from Maryland, Pennsylvania and other points north and northeast passed by Clover lick to Kentucky and Ohio. As many as forty and fifty would be entertained overnight. This made Clover Lick one of the most public and widely known places in the whole country. The approach from the east avoided hollows and ravines, keeping along high loins and crests of ridges so as to be more secure from ambuscades and Indian attacks.

    The original way out from Clover lick, going east, after crossing the Greenbrier, near the mouth of Clover creek, avoided Laurel Run, kept along the high point leading down to the river, and passed close by the McCutchen residence. Mary Warwick had the first road cut out, up the Laurel Run, in order to bring the lumber for the new house from Mr. Wooddell's in the Pine Woods, now Green Bank and vicinity. Mrs. Warwick gave the enterprise her personal attention.

    A number of interesting incidents were given by tradition, illustrating the character of Mary Warwick. While renting Clover Lick, her husband and others were making hay. A shower of rain came up very suddenly and dampened their guns and horse pistols. Late in the afternoon the men fired them off, so as to load them with fresh charges. Some on hearing the report of firearms in quick succession, brought word to Mary Warwick, at Dunmore, that the Indians were fighting the men at the Lick. Mrs. Warwick at once mounted a large black stallion, put a colored boy on behind, and went at full speed and swam the swollen river in her effort to see what had happened. This colored boy was old "Ben," who died at Clover Lick, and was remembered by many of the older citizens.

    Upon another occasion, when the Shawnees were returning from one of their raids to the east, forty or fifty of their warriors were sent by Clover Lick with the intention, it was believed, to pillage and burn. A scout from Millboro warned Judge Warwick of their movements. With about 20 others he waited for them in ambush on the mountain crest, south of Clover Lick. The fire was very effective and every man killed or wounded his victim. The Indians in their surprise hastily retreated and were pursued as far as Elk Water in Randolph county. Upon hearing the result, Mrs. Warwick at once followed her husband and friends, and was attended by servants, carrying provisions for them. She met them at the Big Spring on their return, and the weary hungry party were greatly refreshed by her thoughtful preparations.

    Mrs. Warwick was eminently pious, and was a member of the Windy Cove Presbyterian Church. She never felt herself more honored than when ministers would visit her home and preach. The visiting minister would receive a nice horse, or something else as valuable, as a token of appreciation. She was conscientiously rigid in her domestic discipline. Her brother once made this remark, "Mary, I used to think you were too strict with your family, and you have been blamed for it. I see now, you were right. You have not a child but would kneel in the dust before you, to obey you. I let my children have more liberties, and they do not care near so much for me."

    Rev. Arelas Loomis came from Beverly, for a time, every four weeks, and reached at the Warwick residence. Mrs. Warwick was highly emotional and during the services often appeared very happy. As to her personal appearance, she was tall, slender and blue-eyed, hair slightly tinged with auburn, and when in health, lithe and agile in her carriage. So she was distinguished for symmetry of person, beauty of figure and force of character, all of which she retained even to an advanced age. She was very benevolent, and her kind deeds were done upon the principle of not telling the left hand what the right might be doing. persons in her employ would always be overpaid. Polly Brown, whose lot it was to support her blind mother, received two bushels of corn every two weeks, and no one knew where the supply came from at the time. A person named Charley Collins, who was renowned as an athlete, and whose name was given to one of the Meadows of Clover Lick, did a great deal of clearing. It was reported that he was but poorly paid, but before Mrs. Warwick was done with him, his family was doubly paid by the substantial gifts dispensed with her open hands.

    Among Mrs. Warwick's many other generous deeds, it was told how a rather worthless character, disabled by frozen feet, was received into her house, clothed and fed until he could walk. His name was Bosier. Mrs. Mclaughlin remembers seeing this person crawling up the steps, sitting by the door or reclining under the dining table while preaching services were held. This man afterwards died from the effects of a burring tree falling on him, against which he had made a fire, while on his way from Big Spring to Mace's in Mingo Flats. George See, a grandson of Mrs. Warwick, heard his cries and came to him. In his efforts to rescue him, he exerted himself so laboriously that he was never well afterwards.

    Mrs. Warwick, in her old age, gathered the first Sabbath school ever taught in Pocahontas county, West Virginia. In the summer her servants would lift her on her horse, and she would then ride about four miles to a school house, near where the Josiah Friel cabin stood, which was later in the possession of Giles Sharp. The exercises would begin at about nine o'clock. There was no prayer, no singing, but she would read the bible, talk a great deal and give good advice. The scholars would read their bibles with her. The exercises would close at two in the afternoon. After a continuous session of five hours, Mrs. Warwick would be so exhausted as to require assistance to arise and mount her horse. It was her custom to go to Wm. Sharp's, dine and rest awhile, and then go home late in the day. Among her scholars were Mrs. Mary Gibson, on Elk; Mrs. William Moore and Mrs. Elizabeth McLaughlin, who were daughters of her friend, Mrs. William Sharp. The school was mainly made up of Josiah Brown's family, John Sharp's, William Sharp's and Jeremiah Friel's families.

    A great while before her death, during one of Mr. Loomis' ministerial visits, she received the communion. Upon receiving the elements, her emotions became so great that her husband and children, fearing results, carried her to her own room. For four weeks, she was helpless from nervous post ration. All her children from Bath and Pocahontas were sent for. She died at the ripe age of 80 years, in 1823, at Clover Lick, and there she was buried. There were no services of any kind in connection with her burial. Mary Warwick's grave was on the green hillside, facing the morning sun. The only thing marking the spot at one time, was a peach tree that had spontaneously grown at the head of her grave. Her blood flows in the veins of the Warwicks, Sees, Gatewoods, Camerons, Poages, Beards, Matthews, Moffats, McClungs, Ligons, McClintics and Prices, in the counties of Randolph, Bath, Rockbridge and Pocahontas.

    Jacob Warwick was one of the pioneers who made permanent settlements in what is now Pocahontas and Bath counties Virginia and West Virginia. He resided on Clover Lick for a time, before moving to his immense possessions on Jackson's river, and then returned to Clover Lick. He endowed his seven children with ample legacies and besides bequeathed a competency to ten or fifteen grandchildren.

    Jacob Warwick was an alert and successful Indian fighter, having a series of conflicts, narrowly escaping with his life won several occasions. Yet he was never sure of killing but one Indian. There is a tree on the lands of John Warwick, near Green Bank, where Jacob Warwick killed an Indian in single contest. It always grieved him that he had certainly sent one soul into eternity under such sad circumstances.

    It was his accurate knowledge of mountain regions far and near his serves were in frequent demand by land agents and governmental surveyors. Jacob and others went to Randolph as an escort for a land commission in the service of the colony. It was during the period when Killbuck scouted the mountains with bands of Shawnees and Mingoes. Colonel John Stuart, of Greenbrier, said, "Of all the Indians the Shawnees were the most bloody and terrible, holding all other men - Indians as well as whites - in contempt as warriors in comparison with themselves. This opinion made them more fierce and restless than any other savages, and they boasted that they had killed ten times as many white men as any other tribe. They were a well-formed, ingenious, active people; were assuming and imperious in the presence of others, not of their nation, and sometimes very cruel. It was chiefly the Shawnees that cut off the British under General Braddock, in 1755 - only nineteen years before the battle of Point Pleasant - when the General himself and Sir Peter Hackett, the second in command, were both slain, and the mere remnant only of the whale army escaped. They, too, defeated Major Grant and the Scotch Highlanders, at Fort Pitt, in 1758, where the whole of the troops were killed or taken prisoners.

    The most memorable event of Jacob Warwick's life was his being in the expedition to Point Pleasant, under General Andrew Lewis. The march from Lewisburg to Point Pleasant, one hundred and sixty miles, took nineteen days. It was most probable that Jacob was in the company commanded by Captain Mathews. This conflict with the Indians was the most decisive that had yet occurred. it was fought on Monday morning, October 10, 1874.

    As mentioned earlier, major Warwick's sons and daughters were all born at Dunmore, Pocahontas county, West Virginia. The eldest daughter, Rachel, remembered when the settlers would fly to the fort near her home, when she was a little girl. The fort was near the spot occupied by Col. Pritchard's mill in 1892. Rachel Warwick became the wife of Major Charles Cameron, a descendant of the Camerons noted in the history of the Scottish Covenanters.

    Charles Cameron was in the battle of Point Pleasant, and was there called upon to mourn the death of his three brothers slain in that conflict. Charles Cameron was of medium stature, tidy in his dress, wore short clothes, very dignified in his manners, and was never known to smile after the heart-rending scenes he witnessed at Point Pleasant, Tuesday, Oct. 11, 1774. He was a Major in the Revolution and served as clerk of both courts of Bath county many years.

    In person, Jacob Warwick was tall, stoop shouldered and exceedingly agile and muscular. Mrs. Mary Vance Warwick was a person of highly refined taste, and took all possible pains to make home attractive. After sunday school at her home all present were invited to remain for dinners. Her table service was elegant enough for a prince to enjoy. She had a well supplied library of books in the nicest style of binding, and she made good use of them.

    Jacob Warwick was so genial in his manners, keenly enjoyed the society of relatives and friends, among whom he numbered many of the noblest spirits of Virginia. Jacob never seemed to be conscious of his wealth or superior intelligence, and consequently never assumed airs of superiority. When persons called him Major, it seemed to displease him, and he would remonstrate, "Don't call me Major, I am nothing but Jake Warwick."

    Jacob "Jake" Warwick was jovial in his disposition, extremely fond of innocent merriment. He delighted much in the society of young people, even children. His pleasant words and kindly deeds to young people were vividly and affectionately remembered by all who ever knew him.

    After the decease of his wife, Mary Vance, most of his time was passed at the home of Major Charles Cameron. Jacob died at the breakfast table, when he was merrily twitting Miss Phoebe Woods about her beau, young Mr. Beale, January, 1826, when Jacob was nearing his 83rd year. Jacob was buried about a mile up the west bank of the Jackson's River, reserved for family burial. A locust tree stood near his grave and marked the place. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Scott Cummins - Pilgrim Bard

    Vol 15, Iss 6 Alva, OK - The following concerning Scott Cummins, the Pilgrim Bard of Northwest Oklahoma, appeared in Vol. 4, 2002, of The OkieLegacy Ezine and was furnished to the OkieLegacy Ezine by a descendant of Scott Cummins.

    Scott Cummins, The Pilgrim Bard

    Joan (Wagner) Hodgden and a descendant of Cummins were both members of the Woods County Genealogy Group that had gone on a bus trip to Salt Lake City, Utah in 1982. Joan told about the article she had written.

    George I. Cummins was born in Washington County, Maryland, and Mary Ann Clyde Cummins was born in Pennsylvania according to the census reports. Maryland was listed in George's newspaper obituary.

    Xenia is in Greene County, Ohio. Harrison County was almost always listed as the Pilgrim Bard's place of birth. The person who sent me this information was not sure where Xenia came from.

    George I. Cummins was a minister in the Wesleyan Methodist Church, and does not mention Indians; but that doesn't mean they didn't play a part in Scott's upbringing. There is an article that George had published in the Wesleyan Journal that details one of his trips to members of the church in north central Iowa and he lists who he saw and where he stayed since he was gone for several months. Also, a researcher in Paola did not find any information about George Cummins being an active minister after moving there. She believed he was retired. George may have wbeen ill about that time (possible a stroke) soon after moving there.

    Some believe George and Mary never moved to Barber County, Kansas. It was probably Scott's wandering that brought him there. After George died in 1890 in Paola, Mary Ann moved to the Pilgrim Bard's home and lived with him until she died. George was buried in the cemetery at Paola.

    Joan mentions in her article that "Donald" was a son. Some wonder if that is the boy that Scott and Mary Ann reportedly adopted while in Paola when the "Orphan Train" went through.

    The Pilgrim Bard wrote a lengthy story that was published in the Nescatunga Enterprise titled: "Conception, Birth and Early Days of Nescatunga" and dated Saturday, May 8, 1886. We would really like to find a copy of this 1886 article about Nescatunga. We are still searching, but if anyone out there has a copy we would like to share it in the "OkieLegacy."

    Scott Cummins - Soldier, Bone Peddler, Adventurer, Poet & Maker of Own Legend

    [Joan Hodgden's - 1975 Scott Cummins article] originally appeared in the Alva (Okla.) Review-Courier Progress Edition 1972, written by Joan Wagner Hodgden (my husband's older sister).]

    We know about the virtues that a pioneer must have: a love of adventure, courage in the face of adversity, adaptability, perseverance and just plain grit. But we sometimes leave out a characteristic many of them possessed in a great degree, namely sensitivity to the things around them. This is often revealed to us by a line in a diary; a phrase in an old letter; or a few words scrawled in a bible.

    On of Alva's early settlers left us a whole book revealing his awareness of our mutual surroundings. This man was Scott Cummins, soldier, farmer, adventurer, bone peddler, and maker of his own legend as the undisputed poet of these plains. When he made the Run into Woods County on September 16, 1893, settling near the community of Winchester, Scott Cummins had already been a successful farmer and rancher from the Medicine Lodge area, and an early developer in several Kansas communities. He also had won the reputation as a "Pilgrim Bard" of that area, but the spirit and love of adventure that had impelled him during his past career also brought him here to help open the Cherokee Strip.

    Orange Scott Cummins was the son of parents imbued with a sense of mission. His father, a Methodist minister named George Irving Cummins, was a native of Scotland, and his mother, Mary Ann Clyde Cummins, a native of Ireland. They married in Scotland and left for the United States, where they were to spend 55 years in the ministry moving around the new, and sometimes-raw American West. Scott was born in Xenia, Harrison County, Ohio on May 12, 1846, but went with his parents as a toddler to northeastern Iowa. It was here in a small frontier village that Scott not only met his first Indians, but also grew up with them, playing their games, learning their customs, and obviously loving every minute of it. He was so taken with the glamour of Indian life that he afterwards incorporated these Indian friends, last survivors, he claimed, of the Mesquoquie tribe, into a romance, which he later claimed as his own. The hero of this tale was Cono, a gallant Indian Chief who, upon hearing of the tragic loss of a baby son by a white woman of the settlement, left on her doorstep a little Indian papoose to be raised as her own. Cummins liked to think that he was that baby, and even in later life affected the dress of the Indian frontier scout.

    Scott's growing up took place during times of trouble and change in the United States. He was only fifteen years old when the Civil War started. Nevertheless he tried to enlist immediately in the Union Army, but was refused until he reached the ripe old age of seventeen. In February of 1864 he was taken into Company A of the 3rd Iowa Cavalry. His Civil War exploits included volunteering for dangerous scouting duty behind enemy lines. Perhaps his early Indian games helped him here, and he said that at times the Union uniform was not the only one he was obliged to wear.

    After the end of the war and mustering out, he married Mary Melinda Martin in Iowa, but soon left that state to settle in Kansas where his parents had been sent in another step in their long journeying for the Methodist ministry. Scott Cummins was to be an influence in several Kansas communities, but was perhaps most active at Wellington, Kansas, where as one of the early developers he served as Justice of the Peace and was also for a time the proprietor of the Frontier House, Wellington's early hotel. However, when his parents were sent into less settled Barber County, (Kansas) Scott and his wandering spirit followed to the area where both challenge and fortune beckoned. It was in Barber County that he was to find contentment and fame as a poet.

    In 1874, after a decade of wandering, including the war, Cummins settled in Barber County near the post office of Lodi. Times were hard; these were years of depression and panic, of arguments over gold or silver currency, and nature was also hard, sending years of drought to farmers just wanting to make a start. The Indian raids were not over, either, and it took a good deal of courage not to mention just plain stubbornness to stay in such a country. Cummins stayed and was named U.S. Marshall there. In the back of his dugout was a room dug into the bank behind it where he stored the arsenal of guns to be used by the settlers during an Indian raid. He obtained from a disgruntled settler a claim about five miles from Lodi by trading for it a team of horses and a corn planter he had picked up somewhere. The hard times convinced him that a corn planter would never be of use in Kansas. The old settler took out and Scott settled down to make a living for his family on the farm by Mule Creek. Grandfather Cummins when asked to comment about Scott's move, responded by naming the cabin he built there "Last Chance" - the last chance (then) for a settler to get a good hot meal on his way west.

    To make a living, Scott had to do more than just work on the farm, and so he became a Bone Pilgrim, a gatherer of old buffalo bones, undoubtedly, a profession unique to the Western Plains. The great slaughter of the American Bison, or buffalo, had already taken place, and their bones were left to bleach on the prairie. These bones made good fertilizer when powdered, and burned. Powdered bone ash was also used in ceramics and in cleaning and polishing compounds. It was this gathering job that gave Scott time to observe and respond to the scene around him, and which also took him down into the Cherokee Outlet (popularly known as the Cherokee Strip) to find the ones there. He became familiar on these trips with the Woods County area, and it was here when camping at night, perhaps on Eagle Chief Creek, that he would by the light of campfire and moon put down his thoughts and poetry. He wrote on the materials available - the broad blade of a buffalo knife, or even a piece of soft, flat gypsum. He rarely, if ever, even before publishing, altered or corrected a piece.

    These musings came to the attention of a Medicine Lodge newspaper editor, Tom McNeal, who not only printed them, but also encouraged Scott to publish. It was he who renamed Scott, who usually referred to himself as just a "Bone Pilgrim", as the Pilgrim Bard, a wanderer who sang the praises of the nature he loved. Scott's volume of poetry, published in 1903 when he was living at Winchester, Woods County, was to be titled "Musings of the Pilgrim Bard." A copy of this book was presented to President Theodore Roosevelt, and he, a long time enthusiast for the West, wrote of his approval and delight in the volume.

    Scott Cummins' adventurism spirit might have led him to join the Run of the great opening of the Cherokee Strip even if he hadn't suffered from an unfortunate occurrence at this time, but the Run must have proved irresistible coming just when it did. On July 4, 1893, while the Cummins family was away celebrating the 4th in the usual picnic style at Mann's Grove, Kansas, the family's home and possessions burned to the ground. A firecracker probably started the fire. The loss included the poet's manuscripts, his historical notes, relics and library, and so was a double blow.

    Cummins and his son-in-law, Tom Dyer, who had been a cowboy for the Gregory Eldred Ranch Company, were familiar with the Cherokee Strip country, and Dyer had even surveyed the country in 1891 with the purpose of picking out a location to settle when the Strip was opened. He selected four claims in the same general area, one of which he recommended to Scott Cummins. However, on the day of the Opening when Cummins was encamped near the OE Ranch Headquarters in Barber County, close to Hardtner, he discovered that J. E. Fritzlen and some others from Lake City, Kansas, had brought down racehorses to run for the same section. Mr. Cummins was in a wagon and knew he couldn't beat these fine horses to the place both men wanted. Cummins and his companions decided to stay in the race, however, and when the starting gun sounded, they took their wagon down to the old trail leading to Camp Supply. They then followed it to the Salt Fork, and after crossing there, staked a claim on the west side. They thus became members of the Winchester community, established by Jonathan C. Fuller, who set up a grocery store and Post Office on his claim. Both of these gentlemen were veterans of the Civil War and they enjoyed reminiscing at the store. Mr. Fuller had served with General Grant and Mr. Cummins, of course, told of his scouting experiences. Mr. Fuller, incidentally, named Winchester, for the place in Virginia where General Sheridan started his famous ride. Mr. Cummins named his farm Pilgrim Valley.

    It was also at Winchester that Scott Cummins prepared his volumes for publication. Besides "Musings of a Pilgrim Bard," they included the Indian Tale of "OWAANEO (Pale Flower)," "Twilight Reveries," "Shadows and Sunshine," and "The Spy."

    Mr. Cummins was active in both the development of Woods County and that of Alva, serving as U.S. Land Commissioner for six years, and as Bailiff of the District Court of Woods County under Judge J. L. Pancoast.

    Scott Cummins resided at his Winchester home until his death on March 21, 1928. His wife, Mary, had preceded him in death January 24, 1903. Her grave is still located on a high knoll just west of the Winchester homestead.

    The children of these pioneer parents included Ralla and Dwight, both of whom died in infancy. Walter Scott, Nina Canema, and Donald, Dewey Dwight all resided in Woods County as adults, as did Daisy Lorn Cummins, who later went to live in Colorado. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Carmen Home Memories

    Vol 15, Iss 2 Carmen, OK - We extracted some memories from our Vol. IV, December, 2002, OkieLegacy that we no longer have on our website for those who are still searching for those memories. Carmen Home Memories from Phyllis Lund (phyllisnsf@aol.com) -- "My mother and her siblings were in the home (Carmen IOOF Home) you featured on your web site. They were Hattie, Irene, Milton and Ernest Cox. They would have lived there for several years, beginning in the early '20s. Any info from anyone who would remember or have any connection would be great. Hattie and Ernest are still alive and always wanted to come back to visit. Hattie (84) and in great spirits and health. Mother speaks of carrying lunch to school in a lard bucket and being called 'the home kids.' Also, getting hard candy at Christmas. She has lots more memories if anyone would care to hear!

    "My daughter in law is into genealogy and has discovered the 'Home' my mother and her siblings were in was in Carmen, Oklahoma. It is on the net, under OkieLegacy-Carmen Odd Fellowage Orphanage. I had hoped to possibly reach others who had lived there (or their progeny). I know my mother, who is 84 but very bright and alert, would love to hear from anyone. My grandmother took the children out of the home when she remarried and they all moved to California. My mother married my dad (they were married for 60 years) and had a busy life as a navy wife. As I mentioned, mother would love to go back and visit the home, but with times so uncertain, I am not sure that will happen." View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Irish Emigrants To USA

    Vol 13, Iss 13 Ireland - For those looking for emigrants to the USA, you should check out the National Archives and Records Administration pages, which will give information on how to obtain microfilm records of passenger arrivals. You might need a user ID and password to login into this website, though.

    Heritage Quest Online -- A collection of 25,000+ family and local history books, every word searchable. Every page of each book is presented and can be easily downloaded or copied. Complete U.S. Federal Census, 1790-1930. The page images and corresponding indexes for the entire census, 1790-1930 are included. PERSI - The PERiodical Source Index is a comprehensive subject index covering more than 6,500 genealogy and local history periodicals written in English and French (Canada) since 1800. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Bus Trip to Oklahoma Historical Society (August 2, 2010)

    Vol 12, Iss 29 Wichita, Kansas - Midwest Historical & Genealogical Society Library is sponsoring a 1-day bus trip. Calling All Genealogy Buffs for the Oklahoma Historical Society Research Center bus trip on Monday, August 2, 2010. Secondary stops are being arranged, along the route, for pick-ups so they do not have to drive into Wichita.

    Here is a chance to dig deep into Oklahoma's rich territorial and state history. Especially if you are in the Wichita, Kansas area. Unearth records of generations before yours! The trip is sponsored by Midwest Historical and Genealogical Society, 1203 N. Main, PO Box 1121, Wichita, Kansas 67201.

    The chartered private bus leaves form 1203 N. Main in midtown Wichita, Midwest parking lot. They will board from 6:30-6:50 a.m. on Monday, August 2, 2010. By the time the OHS Research Center opens at 10:00 a.m., they should be among the first in the door.

    The group will enjoy a short tour and orientation by the library staff. Feel free to work at your own pace as there is a casual cafe onsite for breaks and lunch -- or bring your own.

    The group will leave the research center by 5:15p.m. and make a stop for dinner. The bus should pull into the Midwest parking lot between 9:30 and 10:00p.m.

    Trip registration is $40 for MHGS members, $50 for nonmember. Please do not delay! Full registration needs to be received by July 24th. Thanks so much! Membership in the organization is NOT necessary. SEE Registration Form Online View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Black, Salwaechter, Lovellette & Stebens of Carmen, Oklahoma.

    Vol 5, Iss 1 "You have a wonderful web site. I am searching for information on my family. My grandmother Floriene Salwaechter was born in 1914 in Carmen, Oklahoma. I am trying to find out more about her parents and grandparents. The surnames include Black, Salwaechter, Lovellette. Thanks for your site and any other information you might have. I am interested in family history and find that my roots go to Carmen, OK. I am trying to find out more about my GGG-Grandfather George Black. He married Sarah Lovellette in 1864 in Illinois. His daughter Gillian Caroline Black married George Salwaechter. Gillian passed on in 1874 and is buried in the Pleasant Ridge Cemetery in Carmen. I have several pictures and items that lead me to beleive that they lived in Carmen. If any of these names ring a bell please let me know. I am researching my wife's genealogy and find that her Great-Great-Grandmother passed away 3 May 1925 in Carmen, Oklahoma. She immigrated from Russia. Her husband was John Stebens who passed away 27 December 1929 in Carmen. Any information would be helpful. Thanks." -- Stan Mills @ stan.mills@emiservices.com View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Bert Louthan & Belle Cokerham Story

    Vol 15, Iss 5 Cherokee Strip, Oklahoma - Here is another Vol. IV article that appeared in our OkieLegacy ezine back in 2002, that we are adding to our database archives. I thought it important to put in our database archives for those searching genealogy of the Louthan's and Cokerham's.

    Cindy (Louthan) Powell writes, "I have a letter that was written about my great-grandparents by their 10 children. This beautiful tribute was written to them for their 50th Wedding Anniversary. I am very honored to say that I am in possession of the original hand-written version, as well as pictures of the homesteads mentioned. I also have pictures of the celebration honoring Bert and Belle's 50th Wedding Anniversary. Anyone who has any information regarding our family, I would love hear from. Thanks for reading and appreciating this."

    Fifty Good Years

    September 16, 1893 is the date chosen as the beginning of the active life of a young man as he leaves the family fold and ventures forth to create a realm of his own. On that day Bert Louthan and nine other men, "friends and relatives", one of them being his youngest brother Sammie Louthan, lined up astride their prized steeds along an imaginary line to venture into an unknown land, there to claim a portion of this good earth as their own. That day was the opening of the Cherokee Strip for settlement by the white people. And these young men selected a position on the line which was crowded with every sort of conveyance and as the starting signal rang out, the amazing race began. As it proceeded many people lagged and were left behind, but a few forged ahead of the line. Bert, on his swift bay mare was one of these and he soon dismounted and placed his stake. However, all did not go well with this claim, since four others were contenders for the same land. The following, a year later he returned to the strip again to make a search for a homestead. The find was made twelve miles east of Alva and his home was started. That one-half dugout would suffice for only a short time, however, as he kept thinking of taking a bride to adorn a more elaborate home. A building was moved from the state of "Kansas" and prepared for this purpose.

    Bert Louthan and Belle Cokerham first met when Belle, who lived in Missouri, was visiting her sister, Sally, the wife of Eddie Louthan of near Medicine Lodge, Kansas. Burtie was farming in partnership with his brother, Eddie, and making his home with Eddie and Sally.

    Bert and Belle fell in love and Bert wanted Belle to marry him at once and go to the new home in the strip. Belle was willing, but her parents thought Oklahoma was a wild place with vicious indians lurking behind every clump of sage brush ready to spring out and scalp every white man.

    Belle didn't return to Kansas until spring of 1899. By this time she had made up her mind to go with Bert in spite of anything. Without waiting to make a wedding dress, she donned her best dress and in a covered wagon loaded with belongings and all the necessities for frontier living, including a sow and litter of pigs, she and Bert headed for the Cherokee strip stopping in Medicine Lodge long enough to be married on April 20, 1899.

    Belle made a home for them in the bachelor shack Bert had erected on the homestead and they lived there for two years, then selling the place and buying one in the Barnes community in the southern part of what was then Woods county. They built a home on the new place. Through the years it came alive with the patter of little feet, as the family grew together, they battled all odds, drought, floods, wind, and storms and all the hardships of pioneer life. Through sun or shadow, prosperity or poverty, this family was and is still a unit. But even as a unit they did not live for themselves alone.

    In a struggling pioneer community many emergencies arose and the neighbors know that whatever the emergency, Belle and Bert Louthan would respond with whatever help was needed. Ten children came to bless this home and when Sally Louthan died, Bert and Belle opened their hearts and home to include her small daughter, Edna. She grew up with the other children and seems more like a sister that a cousin to them. As these eleven children grew to manhood and womanhood they have all married and founded their own families, five of them are honored citizens of the community their parents helped to build. The others are scattered in six Western states, Kansas, Colorado, New Mexico, Wyoming, California, and Oregon. They are all happy, healthy people.

    Belle always hoped that one of her children would become a minister. She is happy that three of them are now following that calling. The others are government workers, farmers, engineers and that most important occupation, housewives.

    But, whatever the occupation, today, they have forsaken it to be for one day simply sons and daughters. Today they have assembled to pay honor and tribute to Father and Mother on this, their day of days, their 50th wedding anniversary.

    Father and Mother, words cannot express all that is in the hearts of your children today. We are proud to be the sons and daughters of Belle and Bert Louthan. We are proud of your characters, of your faith, and we are proud of you, we are proud of the strength and determination that carried you through the hard years, we are proud of all that you are. So, Father and Mother humbly we say you honor us this greatest of days, your wedding day. -- Fifty years later - April 20, 1949. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    What is Real Reason Why The Heartland States Loathe President Obama?

    Vol 14, Iss 43 Bayfield, Colorado - Why do so many alleged fair-minded Voters in Oklahoma, Kansas & Southern States loathe President Obama? Why do they believe all the absurd falsehoods spread through chain-emails, Facebook and other social networks no matter how preposterous they might be? This puzzles me to no end!

    Is the ultra-conservative Republican ideology in these Southern States, including Oklahoma, Kansas and Texas, on the verge of parading, leaning towards a "kook-dom" of "wingnuts?" Why is this? How do we combat it and fix it?

    It seems to be a widespread, far-fetched undeniably absurdity of internet of chain-letters,FOX rantings by Limbaugh and ultra-conservative media that suggest something else is happening in Oklahoma and other anti-Obama hotbeds?

    Let us open our minds, honestly and see what might be at the core of these hateful rantings. Why doesn't Obama's story fit the historic American presidential dialogue or pattern of past norms, and why do people refuse to leave their comfort zones to embrace the 21st century of the cosmopolitan, internationalized world where different culturals can come together and unite as a family.

    President Obama is of mixed race. Yes! That is true! We are all of mixed heritage. If you would research your genealogy, you would see that is also true.

    Obama's mother was born in Kansas and her family had Oklahoma roots before moving to Kansas before they then moved to Hawaii where Barack Obama was born. That is a fact. Obama's father was an African man. So what!

    Obama is a Harvard grad who did not access the Ivy League because of family legacy or wealth. In other words, to some, it does not meet the dynastic presidency of those such as Bush or Kennedy. Obama appears to these people as a presidency of the Future, and it scares the hell out of some and does not fit the pattern of their comfort zone.

    Big money interests, like Koch Brothers, Adelson, Rove, Trump and wealthy corporate SuperPacs, it seems to me, exploit the less informed voters who are under duress over the Great Recession's economic upheaval. They take advantage of their vulnerability.

    Are wealthy, over-conservatives underwriting and churning out formats of chain emails and sending them out to these vulnerable voters? Why doesn't this remind you of Segretti and Nixon's dirty-tricks squad? Where is the outrage? How do we fight these wealthy, ultra-conservatives and corporations?

    Why do the vulnerable, rural sections of these Southern States buy this nonsense? Have they been preconditioned by the ultra-conservative mainstream media and other politically active religious leaders to believe the worst about Obama and anyone, including Republicans and Democrats who support him?

    Most of the chain-emails being spread around with these absurd falsehoods are forwarded by family and friends to cloak the true identity of the real perpetuator. Those who dispatch the false emails are not repentant, but are indignant. AND ... Their anti-Obama views become hardened if confronted.

    The chain-emails I have received go straight to my "junk" folder and get deleted without ever being read. That is my solution to the problem of the absurdity of those emails. Others may have their own solutions. But what about those cursing, hateful letters that get sent out in the regular mail? What is the solution there?

    We suspect and know that the Obama hatred in Oklahoma, Kansas and Southern States is fueled, to some extent, by race. But there is a denial that sets in when some are confronted with this truth. That is when the Truth-sayer is charged with "playing the race card."

    Is it brainwashing by the over-conservative media that uses fear to get control of the masses? I believe that to be another part of it, but I also believe that it has something to do with some people feeling uncomfortable being outside their comfort zone ... that scares the hell out them?

    The question is ... How do you educate and move these anti-Obama believers into the 21st century? It is like un-brainwashing those in a cult, wouldn't you think?

    How many times have you run across many of your friends on Facebook, who are posting beautiful pictures proclaiming their love for Christ, then in the next few status updates, posting a link to some lie, hate and bigotry-filled post by someone, who gets their only information from Hannity, Limbaugh and FOX News?

    It is ironic that these so-called Christians are supporting a ticket that worships Ayn Rand, a self-avowed atheist, who hated the small, poor people. And these same people (followers) support the GOP ticket that believes corporations are people. Do they not realize they are voting against their own best interests and are being used?

    Also, It is ironic ... if Obama were not African American (actually, he is half African American and half white, but so what) and a Democrat, he would probably be celebrated in Oklahoma and Kansas as the embodiment of the American dream.

    I am supposing that many of these anti-Obama haters find it hard to believe that what Obama has accomplished, he accomplished on his own. I suppose they probably find it hard to grasp. Why is that? Why would some people rather go fishing than research and fact-check for the REAL Truth?

    There is a new 21st century frontier out there that many find difficulty in accepting, which is tightly connected and increasingly becoming a cosmopolitan, internationalized World where different cultures can come together and unite as a family.

    When will Oklahoma, Kansas and those in the Heartland wake-up and smell the roses? How do we help educate - cure them of their bigotry? Is it even a possible task to undertake?

    Let us open our minds, honestly and see what might be at the core of these hateful rantings. Why doesn't Obama's story fit the historic American presidential dialogue or pattern of past norms, and why do people refuse to leave their comfort zones to embrace the 21st century of the cosmopolitan, internationalized world where different culturals can come together and unite as a family. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Early German Emigrants of Augusta, VA

    Vol 12, Iss 10 I found this history book about the Early Western Augusta Pioneers of Virginia over at Ancestry.com. Here is some of the information concerning "The German Families of Augusta" for those genealogy and family tree researchers with some German ancestors that landed in the Augusta county, Virginia area.

    It begins, "One might ask what caused the German families of Augusta to leave their native Vaterland and undertake such a hazardous adventure as a trip across the ocean to American in the early 1700's. The answer lies in the culminating factors of almost constant recurring warfare, the constant drain of taxation imposed by their royal rulers to keep up with the grandeur of the court of Louis XIV in France, the incessant struggle of the Catholic element against the protestants, and not the least, that the entire valleys of the Rhine, the Neckar,a nod the Main Rivers had been set aflame by the fiery speeches of William Penn preaching the new religion of brotherly love, and the glories and the abundance of freedom in the New World."

    It also states, "? There was nothing but praise for settling in Pennsylvania, while there was nothing but condemnation against settling in New York. The way that England had practiced the boldest deception and intrigues upon the early emigrants who were landed on Governor's Island and later transferred to Livingston Manor was soon broadcast throughout the entire Palatinate. As a result the German emigration to New York State soon came to a halt."

    The section of Germany known as the Palatinate lies along the Rhine, the Nekcar, and the Main Rivers. In 1700 its principal cities were Pforsheim, Heidelberg, Mannheim, Frankenthal, Worms, Spire, Alzey, Baccarach, Bretten, Lauteren, Masbach Newstadt, Oppenheim, Simmeran, STromberg, and Ladenberg.

    The Rhine was the highway along which the refugees fled the Palatinate, and it became clogged with every type of vessel that could boast a mast and a sail. The exodus down the Rhine lasted for the six moths from May through October each year. The trip down the Rhine to Rotterdam in the Netherlands lasted from three to six weeks. They had to pass some twenty to thirty customhouses on their way down and each one exacted its fee. The resources of many were exhausted by the time Rotterdam was reached.They were sometimes held in the Netherlands for one to two months. From Dutch ports they were transferred to some English port, where they usually experienced another delay sometimes lasting several months, while waiting to be passed by the customhouse or waiting for suitable winds.

    The ships that brought over these people were small sailing vessels from 63 feet to less than one hundred feet long. Their tonnage was from one hundred to three hundred tons. The voyage to America took up to three months or longer to reach Philadelphia. Upon arrival in Philadelphia there was usually another long delay before they took the Oath of Allegiance to the Crown of England before the city council.

    The great majority of these Germans first settled int he counties of Lancaster, Lebanon, Barks, York, and those immediately surrounding Philadelphia. The Germans in the Valley of Virginia came across the Potomac above Harper's Ferry from Maryland and Pennsylvania. The Shenandoah Valley lay next beyond through the narrow neck of western Maryland. There were a few who came from New Jersey and New York. A few came from the east Virginia counties of Spotsylvania, Orange, and Madison; and also a few, doubtless, from the German settlements in North Carolina.

    The fact is emphasized that the Germans of the Valley of Virginia are descended almost entirely from the emigrants of the early eighteenth century; people who left the Fatherland, not for economic reasons alone, but largely because of religious persecution, political oppression, or military outrages. Such forces always move the best classes - people who at such times are seeking most of all liberty of conscience, health of the stet, and safety for the morals of home and family. The German pioneers of the Valley, like their neighbors the Scotch-Irish, were such a people.

    This research also has a list of names of "Soldiers of the VArious Early Wars (colonial, Indian and Frontier Wars), starting on page 401.
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    MAGILLs In Texas

    Vol 11, Iss 9 If you are in search of MAGILLs in Texas, then you need to follow this link for Doris Ross johnston's genealogy site, Our Texas Family. click on surnames for MAGILL. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Rummaging Through Family Memories

    Vol 13, Iss 8 When you rummage through family boxes searching for your genealogy, you find many interesting items, news of the times they lived through. it says a lot about where you came from and what your ancestors lived through. [the photo on the left above is a digital of Great Grandma's bible with her signature, dated on the inside cover. The image on the right is a news clipping of Great grandma's obituary.]

    Back in January, 2002, as I rummaged through some old family boxes for genealogy information I found the following old family bible of my Great Grandmother, Signora Belle (Gwin) Warwick, and a newscipping of her obituary. On the backside of the November, 1934 Alva newspaper clipping was some interesting tidbits concerning the history of the Salt Fork River bridge an other news of that time.

    The Obituary starts out ... Signora Bell Gwin was the daughter of Sam and Ellen Gwin. She was born near Monterey, Virginia, August 31, 1861 and departed this life at her home in Alva, Oklahoma, November 16, 1934, at the age of 73 years, 2 months, and 15 days. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Genealogy Search

    Vol 3, Iss 3 WINDHAM CTGenExchangeCemetery-Burial Records -- The Internet's first and oldest free databased genealogy web site, The Genealogy Exchange & Surname Registry (GenExchange), simply put, is a genealogical View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Davy Crockett (1786-1836)

    Vol 13, Iss 21 Tennessee - Remember the Alamo? Remember "Davy! Davy Crockett! King of the Wild Frontier?" Remember Davy Crockett? Did he really wear a coonskin cap? Did he kill a bear when he was three? I believe that last to be only a myth.

    My next journey of genealogy research takes us to the surname of CROCKETT, since it has been popping up in the research for our Craighead, Warwick, Dunlap and McGill ancestry. I found the following, A Narrative of the Life of David Crockett, of the State of Tennessee, written by David Crockett, and published in 1834, entered according to the Act of Congress, 1 February 1834, By David Crockett, in the Clerk's office of the District Court of the District of Columbia.

    This is a quote that Davy Crockett had on one the front pages, "I leave this rule for others when I'm dead, be always sure you're right -- Then go ahead!"

    In the Preface of the book Crockett writes, "In the following pages I have endeavored to give the reader a plain, honest, homespun account of my state in life, and some few of the difficulties which have attended me along its journey, down to this time. I am perfectly aware, that I have related many small and, as I fear, uninteresting circumstances; but if so, my apology is, that it was rendered necessary by a desire to link the different periods of my life together, as they have passed, from my childhood onward, and thereby to enable the reader to select such parts of it as he may relish most, if, indeed, there is any thing in it which may suit his palate." (Quote taken from page 6. preface runs through to page 11 and was written February 1, 1834, Washington City, by David Crockett. Chapter I begins on page 13.)

    Crockett's father was John Wesley Crockett, of Irish descent, either born in Ireland or on a passage from that country to America across the Atlantic. John Crockett was by profession a farmer, spending the early part of his life in Pennsylvania. John Crockett married Rebecca Hawkins, an American woman, born in the state of Maryland, between York and Baltimore. John Crockett was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, fighting in the Battle at "Kings Mountain" against the British and Tories. John Crockett at some time lived in Lincoln county, North Carolina, before he moved from there to the country, which embraced the east division of Tennessee before it was a state.

    Davy's Grandfather and Grandmother were both murdered by the Creeks, in their own house, and on the very spot of ground where Rogersville, Hawking county now stands. John Crockett had a brother, Joseph, who the Indians wounded by a ball which broke his arm. Another younger brother of John Crockett was James, (deaf and dumb) and could not make his escape from the Indians, was taken prisoner and remained with the Indians for 17 years and 9 months. James was discovered and recollected by John Crockett and his eldest brother, William Crockett, when he was purchased by them from an Indian trader.

    David Crocket was born 17 August 1786, where is folks lived at the mouth of Lime Stone, on the Nola-chucky River. Davy Crockett's father and mother had six sons and three daughters with David being the fifth son. Davy's family was very poor, living far back in the back woods, with limited schooling opportunities for the children.

    During another move of the family, John Crockett settled in Jefferson county, Tennessee where he opened a tavern on the road from Abbington to Knoxville. His tavern was small and the principal accommodations he kept, were for the waggoners who travelled the road. This is where Davy lived until he was 12 years of age.

    Narrative of the Life of David Crockett
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    Roots & Waynoka Historical Society

    Vol 13, Iss 15 Waynoka, Oklahoma - Sandie Olson (Email: waynokahs@hotmail.com), with the Waynoka Historical Society sent us the following message and a link to the Waynoka OK website. We found this photo on the left in one of our earlier OkieLegacy Ezine volumes.

    Sandie says, "One of the fascinating things that we get to do at the Waynoka Historical Society is assist families in researching their history. Recent visitors were from Wisconsin, California and Texas who had come to see the site of the Modar family's home south of the Cimarron River. One of the ancestors had worked at Monfort Drug in Waynoka. The historical society has a photo of Monfort Drug at the north end of Main Street in downtown Waynoka. It might be safe to say that there is no one living who remembers Monforts in Waynoka, but many of your readers, including me, remember Monforts in Alva.

    "Other recent visitors were related to one of Waynoka's first mayors, "Butch" Hays, and also the Fox family north of Waynoka and Mr. Herren who had a poultry or produce business in Waynoka. One of their early Waynoka relatives had been a Harvey Girl.

    "We are looking forward to the Cherokee Strip Museum Board of Directors tour on Saturday morning, and the Enid genealogy group on Saturday afternoon. Later this month, at the conclusion of the annual meeting of the Oklahoma Historical Society in Enid, there will be a bus tour from Enid to Waynoka. We welcome groups and individuals to visit us. For information, call 580-824-5871 or email waynokahs@hotmail.com." View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Earnest 'Jack' Wilson Inquiry

    Vol 5, Iss 11 "Please add me to your mailing list. I am trying to research genealogy. My husband was born in Freedom. Earnest (Jack) Wilson. His grandfather was Luther Calvin French. I have always been told Granddad French was in the Oklahoma Land Rush. If there are any sites you can connect me to that would help in my research, I would greatly appreciate your help. I would like to know more about the old townsite of Freedom before they moved it because of the railroad." -- Patricia - Email: Patricia75633@aol.com

    [Editor's Note: Newton Wilson Bio, pg. 759 and pg. 760 - Pioneer Footprints Across Woods County.] View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Origins of the GWINN Family

    Vol 13, Iss 13 America - Ron Gwinn sent the link to a couple of his genealogy websites, which I shall give the link below. Ron also says, "Hello, Linda! I believe that you are a descendent of the Gwin(n) family of Augusta County, Virginia. I thought you might find the latest Y-DNA research on the Gwinns to be of interest. Although not mentioned in the websites, two other Gwinn lines have the same results; one is a descendent of Lt. Joseph Gwin, the other is descended from James Gwinn, both sons of Robert Gwin, Sr. of the Calfpasture River."

    Ron mentioned some errors of family legend on his site The Origins of the Gwinn Family that the family tradition has two brothers, Samuel and David Gwinn leaving Ireland together, were shipwrecked and Samuel drowned. David was picked up by a sailing vessel and brought to America. He married an English woman, settled in Augusta County, Virginia and reared a large family. Two of David's sons, james and Samuel came to the Vicinity of Lowell, West Virginia from the Calf pasture River, Virginia, about the year 1780.

    He goes on to mention on his website that the first GWINN settler on the Calf Pasture River was Robert Gwin, Sr. who was the father of David, Joseph, Robert, James and Samuel.

    The family tradition does clearly point to Ireland as the place of origin and Augusta County as the destination of the GWINN family. The story of a shipwreck, or very bad storm, is an enduring legend in the GWINN family and may have a basis in historical fact.

    On that same page under the heading "The PUblished Sources," the History of the Graham Family, by David Graham, published in 1899, states "Samuel and James Guinn, two brothers, settled and made their home near that of Graham. Before the Lowell settlement the Grahams and Guinns were neighbors on the Calf Pasture River and had even both sailed over the blue waters from Ireland."

    Another source, History of Rockbridge County by Oren F. Morton, says that "John Graham and his family experienced a great storm during their voyage from Ulster." Again echoing the GWINN family legend.

    Ron's website states that, "Robert Gwin, Sr. makes his first known historical appearance in a land transaction in Augusta County, Virginia. At a court held for Orange County on Thursday, July 20, 1745, an indenture was acknowledged and ordered to be recorded between James Patton and John Lewis of Beverly Manor, Augusta County and Robert Gwin of the Calf Pasture, Augusta County. The indenture was for the sale of 544 acres on the Great Calf Pasture River to Robert Gwin for five shillings. The indenture was signed by Patton and Lewis and sealed and delivered before witnesses David Kinkead, Robert Bratton and Loftis Pulliam on July 16, 1745."

    Ron's other website, The GWINN Family, mentions among other things that, "The Gwinn family was until recently believed to be of Welsh descent. However, Y-DNA testing of three documented descendents of Robert Gwin, Sr. matched the Northwest Irish Modal Haplotype (R-M222). This rare haplotype appears in only 10 percent of men in Ireland. A study conducted by Trinity College Dublin noticed a close relationship of this haplotype with surnames associated in the traditional Irish genealogies with the Ui Neills--Irish and Scottish dynasties claiming descent from the Irish warlord and High King, Niall Noigiallach or 'Niall of the Nine Hostages.'" View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    HURT Family Legacy

    Vol 15, Iss 2 Oklahoma - Just in case someone out there is searching for HURT family ancestors, here is another piece of genealogy information that might be of some use to another. Since it is about ten years old, we do not know if the email addresses work or have been changed.

    "I am a Hurt. They tell me that my grandfather's parents were born in Bohemia and settled in Abby, Nebraska (Grant Co.) My grandfather was named Edward and he would have been born around 1880 I think in Neb. The name was originally Hurdt. My grandfather lived in Woodward and Carmen. They had two sons(Edward Jr. and Arlington). I know they lived in Carmen between l920- 1960. My grandfather spoke fluent Bohemian as well as English. He was a barber by trade. I remember him taking me to the Kolache Festival in Prague when I was a kid. We lived in Shawnee. He would come to visit. I have no idea if we are part of your family tree. Unfortunately, my father didn't seem to know much of his family past and my grandfather died when I was ten. I do remember the name Vason or Vasin which could have been my grandfather's mother's maiden name. If you can shed any light on my ancestors, I would greatly appreciate it." -- SoonerEd3rd@aol.com View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    McCary Family Home & Story

    Vol 15, Iss 8 Oklahoma - We received the following McCary family information back in 2002 from Charles Cook. We are re-submitting it to our OkieLegacy database by way of this week's newsletter in hopes that the Cook's might make another connection to their genealogy research.

    Charles Cook writes back in 2002, "Besides the Martin's and Barnett's of early Woods County, I am also descended from a McCary family who lived in and around Alva. In the book Pioneer Footprints Across Woods County - 1976 by the Cherokee Strip Volunteer League, on pages 441, 442, 443, this family was written about by the late Evelyn B. Stout.

    "I descend from James C. McCary and his son Charles Henry McCary. James was my great-great-grandfather. His wife Mary Elizabeth Slocum was his first cousin's child. Therefore I descend from the McCarys twice. Evelyn shared information with me.

    However, in my research I later found some of that information incorrect. James C. McCary was born about 1838 in Fluvanna County, Virginia, according to early census records. Family tradition indicates he raised his age when he went to Kansas so a son could do the same and be able to homestead land. "His wife Mary Elizabeth was named Slocum, but she was already five years old when her mother married Lewis Slocum. Furthermore, the Union general Slocum had no brother named Slocum. So there's another old family story that proved inaccurate.

    "James C. was born into a wealthy Virginia family who owned many slaves. I'm attaching some Photos of the McCary Plantation Home in Fluvanna County and a paper I did about the home and James' father, Richard R. McCary, being tried for murder, leading to the loss of the plantation. James was the last McCary born in the house.

    "The following is the family version of what happened. Richard owned a number of slaves. One night he caught a neighbor, named James Noel, in the slave quarter, 'messing with the girls.' Richard told him that if he ever caught him again he would 'beat him within an inch of his life.' About a week later Richard caught him again. He was carrying a cane. He beat the man so badly with it that he died about a week later. He was said to have been arrested for murder and put in the old stone jail." Read More at this Link - Richard R. McCary's Trial Story.

    Photo of James C. (McCary)


    Photo of Mary Elizabeth Slocum McCary (taken in Alva)


    Photo of James 1913 Reunion of Veterans of Battle of Gettysburg
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    Oklahoma Research & Twitter

    Vol 11, Iss 16 Paul Ricketts (paul@thesunrideshigh.com) says, "Hi Linda, After seeing you on Twitter, I was interested to see your website and research. Whilst we live in Maryland, I?m researching my wife?s family in Oklahoma.

    She is a Stewart, her parents live in Edmond but she has family at Midway Station near Mulhall and her great grand parents lived in Red Rock Township. We have direct lineages through the Stewart?s, Burright?s and Le Grande?s.

    I realize that you are working on areas out to the NW of Oklahoma but we may have some common ground in terms of research.

    As well as the specific family genealogy I am interested in cartography and migration throughout the US in general. Last week I checked out the map collections at NARA Archives II in College Park. They have quite a few maps of Oklahoma although most are fairly obscure government surveys. I?d be happy to see what they have in relation to Alva next time I go if it would be of interest."
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    Dacoma Alumni - Reunion...

    Vol 6, Iss 16 "The Dacoma High School Alumni Reunion was held Easter weekend, Saturday, April 10, 2004, in the Dacoma Gymnasium. We have the reunion every second year on the Saturday evening before Easter. Part of the evening's celebration includes a memorial service for those DHS alumni who have died since the previous alumni reunion. This year, I took the liberty of transferring the list to a web page, thinking that perhaps it might aid someone in a genealogical search. The web page is located at the following URL: freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~murrow/RCM/dacoma-alumni-memoriam.htm." -- Rodney Murrow - Email: murrows@pldi.net - Dacoma High School, Class of 1967, Now living in Freedom, OK View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Durant Unsolved Mystery (ca. 1914)...

    Vol 7, Iss 42 I have a contact who is searching for information about a murder in Durant ca 1914. The victim was a 14-year-old girl named Pauline Amsel. I plan to send an email to the Bryan County Genealogical Society and ask for help. They should have copies of the Genealogy Quarterly in their facility for the years 1988-1990 where the article appeared that my contact learned about the Durant Unsolved Mystery). I just happened onto your magnificent site and thought I would try your avenue. You know how it goes, you just never know where a lead might come from! Thanks, again, and if you have any more ideas, please let me hear from you." -- Jeanne - EMAIL: jdodson@atlantic.net View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Wilkes-Barre Crusade

    Vol 3, Iss 3 Duryea, Pennsylvania - "I am enjoying your tales of Oklahoma. I wish you had some of Duryea, Pennsylvania. I have been searching for my grandfather (actually his burial site) for years. Death records for 1895 burned and no one has any record of where he was buried. I am continuing my search. Have some names of people who do research, and am trying to find someone who can read tombstones by going to all the cemeteries. I cannot climb the hills, and over the old stones, in some of the real old cemeteries. Going to go back to Wilkes-Barre (where I grew up) this summer and search some more. W-B. is close to Duryea. Would be a nice closure. He died at age 21, in some type of an accident. My grandmother (maternal) was widowed at age 20, with 2 children, and another on the way." -- Lanie, eberg@pouch.com Marcy Cemetery Durya, Pa Partial List from work compiled by the Wyoming Historical and Genealogy Society (Historical Society of Pennsylvania Library) View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    McGill Genealogy

    Vol 9, Iss 35 "Hi! I'm Billie Watts from Livingston Parish, Louisiana. Im interested in genealogy on the FIELDS side (my Mother and my Father's side). My Grandmother Elizabeth FIELDS is my Great-Great-Great-Great-Grandmother on my Mom's side and my Great-Great-Great-Grandmother on my Dad's side. Her Father was Elijah FIELDS and she married Robert RATCLIFF.

    I have a picture that belonged to my Grandpa HENRY MARTIN on my Mom's side, whom is MARY HELTON McGILL. I kept trying to figure out why I have this picture, but I had the picture enlarged, and there was numbers on her hat. The numbers were 556 Crocia Fields, 555 Rannie Fields, 532 John Manor. His number from the Archives say's 2nd FIELD, C. T. FIELDS. Number 558 is Abbie Brown, 557 is Perry Ross.

    When I saw your website (ParisTimes Genealogy), I realized you are interested in the McGILL genealogy. I saw that Richard Fields' farm was on Sales Creek and McGill bought it from him. I thought this may be my answer as to why I have this picture. Mary (Helton) McGILL is the daughter of Chief Daniel HELTON -- married to a Robert McGILL.

    I thought someone could shine some light on this for me. This is the first time I emailed someone so please excuse the punctuation and the mess." -- Billie Watts, 19089 Hwy. 42, Livingston, LA 70754

    [Editor's Note: On our ParisTimes Genealogy website you can view our MCGILL/MAGILL Ancestor's history at the following URL - ParisTimes - McGill Ancestry. This is the paragraph pertaining to the Fields Settlement -- "A well-known historian of Hamilton County (Mrs. Penelope J. Allen) learned in her research that the Sale Creek pioneers bought land in an area known as the "Fields Settlement". It was known as the home of a famous Cherokee Chief (Richard Fields). According to Lucille Bates research completed in 1971, "There is still evidence of a settlement on the west bank of Sale Creek that extends toward Coulterville from its confluence with McGill Creek. It has been told that Fields sold out his improvements to a group of settlers and left Tennessee in 1808 when he moved on to Arkansas and then Texas where he became the leader of the Texas Band of Cherokees.

    William and Nancy built their home near McGill and Sale Creeks, close to the trail that led northward to Knox County and southward to Ross's Landing. This path that was used by both the red and white man in the early settlement of Tennessee, has now become the Federal Highway Number 27 and connects Chattanooga with Knoxville, Tennessee.

    Along the bottomland that ran along the creek such crops as corn, tobacco, and wheat were grown and the surplus products were freighted by the brother's to Patterson's Place on Opossum Creek. The surplus crops were then sold and Patterson would dispose of them through trade on the Tennessee River."]
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    Frank "Pistol pete" Eaton Info

    Vol 9, Iss 23 "I'm hoping you can help me. I'm related to the family of Pistol Pete and would like to go to the reunion in Perkins, Oklahoma. I'm trying to locate someone who knows when it is and who to contact to get details.

    I'm also hoping for a little genealogy about him. My mother's maiden name was EATON and I grew up hearing stories of Pistol Pete. I have letters from him he wrote to his nephew, Harold. I thought I knew the link but when I joined the Eaton Genealogy Society, I found the link was not correct, so now I'm searching again. If you can forward my e-mail to anyone who could help me, I would certainly be happy. Thank you so much." -- Judy - Email: JForth@polytainersinc.com

    [Editor's Note: Through Oklahombres.org forum we found some information about Pistol Pete (Frank Eaton). We also found a place to contact for more information about the reunion. This is what we found: "Try the Payne County Historical Society at P. O. Box 2262, Stillwater, OK. 74076 or try their E-mail address at: Echowell@ft.newyorklife.com."]
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    Pennsylvania Dutch Favorite - Chicken Corn Soup...

    Vol 6, Iss 29 "      I wonder if these rivels and your Thrieviel could be the same thing? I can't find either in any dictionary at least refering to food. I do know that in my Mothers genealogy she had a g-great grandfather by the name of Jacob Treece and when I researched him he was German from Pennsylvania. The original spell of Trece was Dries, the D translates to T in the old English so this may be a clue. I thought it might be interesting to try to find out. My sister said our Mother learned this from my Father's mother and that she was German. I personally think she was quite a mix, according to my research. But I did find this recipe and it seems to be leading in that direction. "A real Pennsylvania Dutch favorite! I have made this several times over the years."
    Chicken Corn Soup -- Ingredients...1 (4 pound) chicken 1 onion, chopped 4 quarts water 1 (10 ounce) package frozen whole kernel corn 1/2 cup chopped celery salt and pepper to taste.  1 cup all-purpose flour 1 pinch salt 1 egg 1/4 cup milk 2 hard-cooked eggs, chopped.
    Directions... In a large stock pot cover chicken and onion with water. Cook slowly until tender, approximately 1 hour. Remove chicken, let cool and remove meat from bones. Cut meat into 1 inch pieces, discard skin and bones.

    1. Cut corn from cobs if using fresh corn.
    2. Add corn, cut up chicken, celery to stock pot and season with salt and pepper. Simmer soup for 10 minutes.
    3. In a separate bowl make rivels by mixing together flour, salt, egg, and enough milk to form small crumbs.
    4. Drop rivels into soup and add hard boiled eggs. Simmer for 15 minutes and serve hot." -- Sharon View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    MORE LOUTHAN Family Links

    Vol 10, Iss 46 This website reports that Gilbert Shirley Louthan was born in 1920, and was a husband to Rosie and father to Mary Ann.

    * Below is a list of the newest databases which contain LOUTHAN genealogy records. -- Louthan Genealogy & Family History Research
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    Magill Family in Maryland...

    Vol 6, Iss 30 "I am currently researching my Magill ancestry in Maryland. Elizabeth D. Magill born ca. 1857, married Marcellus Alexander Gatton. She was the daughter of Matthew Magill and Jane E. Jones. Matthew was the son of Charles A. Magill and Rebecca Jarboe. Anyone else connect with this line?" -- Cheryl Baez - Email: GenealogyGirl@comcast.net View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Lookout, Oklahoma & Crown Hill Cemetery of Coldwater...

    Vol 6, Iss 6 "Congratulations on your interesting and well-made website! I found your site while searching for information on residents of Woods County, Oklahoma that were buried in Lookout, Oklahoma or in the Crown Hill Cemetery at Coldwater, Kansas." -- Jerry Ferrin - E-mail: jdf@theriver.com - Comanche County, Kansas: History and Genealogy View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Florence (Louthan) Paris Deceased

    Vol 10, Iss 45 "Linda, I don't know if you knew that my mom went to heaven on Oct 14, 2008. She was in the Bass Hospital at Enid. I will miss her greatly as I called her nearly every day. I thought you would like to know." -- Cousin Janice (Paris) Fulbright

    Florence (Louthan) Paris Obituary:
    Florence T. (Louthan) Paris was born Dec. 2, 1915, near Chester, Okla. She died Oct. 14, 2008, at Integris Bass Baptist Health Center in Enid at the age of 92 years. Florence T. Louthan married Leslie Martin Paris (born Dec. 2, 1910, died July 13, 1982) 24 Dec. 1935, Chester,Major Co., OK. Florence & Leslie Paris had three children: Janice, Margaret and Jimmy.

    Florence T. (Louthan) Paris was a resident of Chester, OK for most of her life, except for a brief time when she lived at Eudora and Haviland, Kansas. Florence was a cook. This Obit info appeared in The Pratt Tribune; Publication Date: 17 Oct 2008; Publication Place: Pratt , KS , US. More details of Florence & Leslie Paris can be found at Paris Genealogy and search for "Leslie Martin Paris."
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    Monterey House Hotel - Virginia

    Vol 10, Iss 18 "My wife Martha has genealogical connections to Monterey, Virginia, the county seat of Highland County. We once made a stop there and researched her family?s records in the court house and library there. We had previously done the same in bordering Pendleton County, West Virginia. To the left is a photo of the Monterey House Hotel.

    Monterey has the highest elevation of any town east of the Rocky Mountains, at 2894 feet. It has a population of less than 200. Actually, it was formed in 1847 from Pendleton County. The latter was formed from Augusta and other counties in 1788. Later, even though they were once part of the same county, Highland went with the Confederacy when the Civil War broke out, and Pendleton went with the Union. This resulted in the two counties being in different states after the war.

    This is one of the most beautiful and charming areas we ever visited in the east. Highland is the least populated counties of the state. However, the annual Maple Festival draws 50,000 people each spring. There are also several hotels; including the Monterey House which is an Eastlake styled structure over a hundred years old.

    The surnames we were researching were BIRD and COOK?the latter no relation to mine. We were traveling in an RV and used the parking lot of the local bank, and parked there over night. In the early days the local government and court operated in an inn owned by Martha?s ancestor. We knew what street it had been on and could not find the street. Someone in the library told us that the streets? names had been changed. She then pointed out where the inn would have been located?where the bank?s parking lot is presently. Yes, we had spent the night where the inn had been located, without even knowing it. Genealogy is fun." -- Charles M. Cook
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    McClains of Alva, OK

    Vol 9, Iss 52 "I'm searching for a long-lost cousin for my family genealogy, and I've lost track of her. Her maiden name was Patti McClain, and her parents owned a shoe store in Alva, OK. Her mother was a first cousin of my father, and her father's name was Everett McClain, and she would have graduated from Alva High School sometime around 1959 or 1960, I believe. She went to Okla. State University, where she was in Chi Omega soroiety. If you have any idea of whom I could contact, such as someone who helps on class reunions, for example, I would be most appreciative." -- Neal North, Ponca City, OK - Email: nnorth@cableone.net
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    Chief Black Hawk & Sac & Fox...

    Vol 6, Iss 28 "Prior to the internet I spent five years researching Chief Black Hawks genealogy and Sac and Fox peoples. Jan Steven was associated with the Sac and Fox Library was a friend of mine and I use to have a subscribtion to the local tribal paper. I am very interested and sharing my studies." -- SHEILA HOEFER - Email: trustnoone13@juno.com View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    GUINN Connection

    Vol 7, Iss 9 "Hi there! Just taking a 'stab' to see if in any research on Guinn's (or GWINN, GWIN) you have heard of my Gr-Grandfather by the name of Anias (or Ananias) Arnelius GUINN from West Virginia?

    He was married to Ann Sparks (Dorsey) GUINN, in 1866, in (I think) Nicholas County. I was always told there was Native American connections somewhere. He was tall 6 ft. 2 in. and had red hair. Do not know his parents names, but they were from the Virginia, and West Virginia area. Thank you." -- Judy Bloom - Email: bloomjl@psyber.com

    Editor's Note: Our GUINN/GWIN/GWINN Connections can be see at ParisTimes Genealogy -- GUINN Surnames. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Oklahoma Hospital for the Insane, Supply, OK

    Vol 9, Iss 5 "Hello! I just came across your interesting website, through a search for the Oklahoma Hospital for the Insane in Supply, OK. My gg-grandfather, Robert "Barry" Johnson of Miami, OK/Seneca, MO/Arkansas, was a patient at the hospital in 1912. He likely died there that year or the following.

    Thanks so much for the reply, and putting the inquiry into your ezine. Since I wrote you the other night, I've found some info, including a listing I think has to be my ggf's burial place (the hospital cemetery), but no month or day of death. The www.usgennet.org - Woodward county website is where I found this list of persons buried in the cemetery. There are also links to other lists of persons thought to be buried in this cemetery, and a little history on the fort/hospital.

    Today, I'm hoping to find time to contact the hospital, currently (?) Western State Psychiatric Center at (580)-766-2311, the FHL in Woodward, and Woodward City Library, just in case any of the old records might have survived. An article I read last night (in "Genealogy" magazine?--was at a bookstore) said probate court records (in the home county) are sometimes helpful in searching for someone committed to an "asylum". I'm not sure if this would have been Ottawa Co., OK, or Newton Co., MO or where, so will start with the above first!

    We had no clue what became of my "Mamaw's" father until a 1912 letter from the hospital turned up in family papers. Thanks for your website. I'm sure I'll be referring back to it. Thank you for your time reading this." -- Vicki Cochran - Email: aacmom@yahoo.com
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    Researching Oklahoma Genealogy

    Vol 10, Iss 30 "Those of you searching ancestors' records may find this group helpful:research For Oklahoma Genealogy. It was established in April and there are some good leads turning up." -- Elizabeth Dyer
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    Books On Woods County, OK

    Vol 9, Iss 6 "You may want to mention the following information on your site as it is about a google site which is not widely publicized: books.google.com. Complete copies of the "full view" books, as they are called on the site, can be viewed online, downloaded and printed out. They are in the public domain. Currently, there are 31 books available which mention Woods County, Oklahoma. The following is a link to a search results page which lists and links to those books: tinyurl.com/37otvz. Best regards." -- Jerry Ferrin, Webmaster - Comanche County, Kansas: History and Genealogy and Barber County, Kansas: History and Genealogy
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    Hlasatel Kalendar (Czech)

    Vol 10, Iss 40 "I don't know if you or any of your family researchers might be interested in these. I'm a genealogy person also, but all my folks are western Europe. I found a reference to this publication on your website.

    I just acquired a stack of them from the 1940's. They are very interesting except that I can't read Czech. The illustrations from the community (ads for memorial chapels, grocery stores, furniture stores) are pretty cool. For what it's worth!" -- Susan Embler - Email: silverart@usa.net
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    Searching History of Osage County...

    Vol 6, Iss 25 "I am currently searching the history of Osage County in my search for family geneology and have found articles in your site very interesting. I saw a lot of flyers in my area advertising Okie genealogy research but your site was by far the best starter. Thanks." -- D. Ward - www.flyerstarter.com - Email: donward@aol.com View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Woods County OKGenWeb Messageboard...

    Vol 7, Iss 34 Have you signed up with the Woods County, OKGenWeb mailing list yet? It has lots of information out there for genealogy minded persons searching their roots. You can learn so many things there on their messageboard. Such as... information about Antelope IOOF Cemetery. We did not know that Antelope Cemetery even existed, but it does exist around the Avard area. AND... Did you know that Martin Luther Mitchell owned his own grocery store in Alva, Oklahoma about 1910? His two sons were Charles (a baker) and Raymond (owned a horse ranch) about 1910. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


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