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Yes, three it was.
 ~ regarding Okie's story from Vol. 12 Iss. 7 titled UNTITLED

I found this article in Beliefnet.com: President Theodore Roosevelt once said, "The mother is the one supreme asset of national life; she is more important by far than the successful statesman, or business man, or artist, or scientist." Today, mothers continue to be an important part of our national character [more]...
 ~C Coulston regarding Okie's story from Vol. 7 Iss. 18 titled UNTITLED


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NW Okie's Journey

Vol 18, Iss 4 Houston, TX - We continue this week with old news clippings from 1884 concerning the January, 1884 Lynching of E. D. Atchison near Monterey, Virginia. Back in 2011 I received research from Michael Sellers with his research he had done on the lynching. You can find that information in my OkieLegacy Ezine/Tabloid at the following links: Vol. 11, Iss. 41 and Vol. 14, Iss. 20

It was in the recent news archives this week where we found a Chicago, Illinois newspaper trying to blame the lynching of Atchison on the Bourbon Democracy of Virginia. Was this the case? Who were the Bourbon Democrats? Was it a drunken political misunderstanding between E. D. Atchison and Sidney Ruckman, who was a prominent Readjuster Republican (superintendent of Highland public schools) with Atchison stabbing Ruckman in a drinking establishment what enraged the 10 men of Highland County, Virginia to lynch Atchison? That is what we try to discover in this weeks OkieLegacy Ezine/Tabloid.

A Virginia Lynchinga
It was in The Times Democrat, New Orleans, Louisiana, dated 10 January 1884, Thursday, page 2, that we find this small mention of "A Virginia Lynching."

Found on Newspapers.com

Staunton, Va., Jan. 9 (1884) -- E. D. Atchison, who was incarcerated for stabbing Sidney Ruckman, was taken from Monterey jail by a mob and hanged. The body was then riddled with bullets.

A Lynching In Virginia
Here is another short news article that appeared in the National Republican, Washington DC, dated 10 January 1884, Thursday, page 1, with the headlines: "A Lynching In Virginia."

Found on Newspapers.com

Staunton, VA., Jan. 9 (1884) -- On Saturday morning, Jan. 5, 1884, E. D. Atchison was taken from the jail at Monterey, the county seat of Highland county. His jailer and guard were overpowered, and the prisoner was carried about one mile from Monterey and hanged and his body riddled with bullets. Atchison was in jail awaiting indictment for stabbing Sidney Ruckman on the Twenty-fourth of December last. Ruckman was still living. Atchison bore the reputation of being a desperate character.

1884 Lynching of E D Atchison in Monterey, VA
Back in April, 2011, I received a letter from Michael Sellers concerning research he had done on the 1884 lynching of E. D. Atchison in Monterey, Virginia. I've included that 2011 message below:

"Hi Linda, Just came across your message from March 20 seeking information about your great grandfather, John Robert Warwick, and the January 1884 lynching of E. D. Atchison in Monterey, Highland County, VA. I've done quite a bit of research regarding the lynch-murder of Atchison. I am a distant cousin of three of the men involved. My research was more involved in what happened to and became of the men after they fled Highland County. Another elder cousin of mine is a direct descendant of one of the men, while being related as a cousin to two others. His research was extensive, which he then developed into a book.

"Your great grandfather, John Robert Warwick, was not the lone man tried, acquitted by a Rockbridge County jury. In fact, evidence and firsthand testimony shows that your great grandfather was not only an active participant but also nearly committed another murder during the lynch mob's removal of E. D. Atchison from his jail cell.

"First, the lone man tried and acquitted of the charges by jury was John Anderson (J. A.) Chestnut. J. A. Chestnut was the only one of the 10 involved in Atchison's murder to not flee Virginia. Chestnut had been married for 11 years to Nancy Wiley and had 6 young children at the time of Atchison's lynch-murder, plus his wife was 8 months pregnant with their 7th child. I suspect that having 6 young children with the imminent arrival of a 7th were large reasons why he didn't flee. Chestnut was born in Highland County and was well-known. The trial was moved from Highland County to Rockbridge County in order for Chestnut's lawyer(s) to convene an impartial jury and to receive a fair trial.

"I don't have the particulars of the trial itself, however, Chestnut was indeed acquitted of all charges. After the trial, Chestnut returned to Highland County where he and his wife, Nancy, had at least two more children prior to 1890.

"Chestnut and his wife separated shortly after 1910 and were divorced by 1920. Upon the separation, Chestnut removed to the town of Cass in neighboring Pocahontas County, WV. Chestnut died there on July 1, 1926, at the age of 77. His body was returned to Mill Gap in Highland County where he was buried in Bird Cemetery.

"Second, in regards to your great grandfather, John Robert Warwick, he was positively identified by the jailer, Joseph Hiner, as being one of the 10 men who removed Atchison from the jail and lynched him. The following is somewhat of a paraphrase of Joseph Hiner's testimony when arrest warrants were issued for 9 of the 10 men involved in Atchison's lynch-murder. The 10th man has escaped anonymously into history as Hiner was unable to identify him.

"Just after midnight, in the early morning hours of Friday, January 4, 1884, 10 men broke into the Monterey jail, took E. D. Atchison from his cell and lynched him from a tree on Trimble's Knob near Monterey. The jailer, Joseph Hiner, gave sworn testimony that 10 men, all smelling of liquor, approached and demanded the keys to the jail in order for Atchison to be taken. Hiner refused, stating that he didn't have the keys, and the men abruptly left. A short time later the men again approached the jail but, this time, they were in possession of all the guns and weapons they could carry along with a rather large log that was to be used as a battering ram against the doors of the jail and Atchison's cell itself.

"Hiner stood in their way and, after a heated exchange in which one of the men, Robert Warwick, attempted to fire a rifle at Hiner himself, the men contented themselves with firing their weapons into the jail. Hiner further testified that many of the men were able to fire at Atchison from close range, so close that Atchison was able to knock the gun or rifle out of the hands of at least two of the men. Finally, the men were able to bust through the doors of the jail and into Atchison's cell. Hiner stated that Atchison was shot multiple times, at least four times from what he could see, and was barely breathing and nearly unconscious when the men dragged him out of the jail and into the snow.

"Once outside, the men bound his ankles and wrists and began dragging him through the snow towards Trimble's Knob. Hiner further stated that one of the men shouted at him that he [Hiner] could find Atchison at a particular tree along the road in the morning. At daylight the following morning, Hiner followed the trail of blood in the snow left by Atchison being shot and dragged and indeed found him hanging from a white oak tree on Trimble's Knob located on Spruce Street just south of Monterey.

"Based on Hiner's eyewitness testimony, murder warrants were sworn out against 9 of the 10 men. In swearing out the warrants, Hiner stated that he was able to positively identify 9 of the 10 men because the masks worn by each of them had fallen during the course of the night. By the time the men had finally broken into the jail and retrieved Atchison, they were no longer trying to hide their faces. All of the men identified were from "outstanding families in the area," and most all of them were related in some way whether as cousins or by marriage.

"The family of one of the men involved, Giles H. Gum, independently corroborated Hiner's testimony by stating that Robert Warwick had indeed leveled a rifle at the jailer, Joseph Hiner, at close range with his finger on the trigger and was about to fire when Gum knocked the rifle from his hands at the last moment. There is some speculation that Warwick did indeed fire his rifle at Hiner but that Gum knocked the rifle away a split second prior and the bullet instead richocheted off the jailhouse rather than striking Hiner.

"Though positively identified by the jailer, Joseph Hiner, the reason and/or cause of Robert Warwick's involvement in Atchison's lynch-murder is the hardest to figure. Most of the other men involved lived in the area around Mill Gap in Highland County and were related as cousins or by marriage, however, Warwick doesn't seem to be related to any of them and was, according to the previous 1880 Census, living in Huntersville in Pocahontas County, WV, some 25 miles southwest of Mill Gap. Robert Warwick was definitely there and was well-known to the jailer, Joseph Hiner. But, why or how Robert Warwick came to be in the Mill Gap area and how or why he came to be involved in Atchison's lynch-murder is still murky, at best.

"According to John Robert Warwick's obituary in the "Fairview Newspaper" of Woods County, OK, he was married to Signora Gwin on January 16, 1882, in Harper's Ferry, WV. He later came to Kansas and taught school at Coldwater, waiting for the opening of Oklahoma's Cherokee Strip for settlement. He 'made the run' Sept. 16, 1893. As he was accustomed to the water and wood in abundance on the wooded hills and plains of West Virginia, he looked first for wood and water when looking for a homestead. He staked a claim 7 miles south of Alva, on Eagle Chief, but learning by experience that more abundance lay in the level wheat lands - he sold his wood-and-water farm and bought level wheat land 5 miles south of Alva. Here he and his wife lived until 1929 when they moved to Alva. His wife preceded him in death three years, almost to the exact time of his death, dying in Nov., 1934. John R. was said to have had cancer of his jaw.

"According to what I have, his 2nd child, Robert Lee Warwick, was born in November 1887 in West Virginia. John Robert Warwick likely made the move to Kansas in either 1888 or 1889 before then "making the run" into Oklahoma in 1893. Third child, Wilbur, was then born in Alva, Woods County, OK, on Oct. 13, 1895.

"I'm sure that Robert, as most did, came out to Oklahoma in 1893 and likely staked out where he was going to "make his run" in preparation for the Sept. 16, 1893, run into Oklahoma for the land grab. I've spoken to a good many descendants of the men involved, and invariably they report stories of the families uprooting in the middle of a night, piling into wagons all they could carry and simply disappearing into the night fleeing from Virginia. Warwick appears to have just simply returned to neighboring Pocahontas County, WV, before then heading on to KS some years later."
We shall overcome! Good Night! Good Luck!
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Oakie's NW Corner

NW Okie (Linda)

Vol 5, Iss 13 OKC, Oklahoma -

It was another windy, Spring week here in Oklahoma, except for this Friday when the temperatures dipped down into the 40s and 50s. The end of March brings a possible chance of frost, freezes this weekend... but no snow.

I have been spending my time this week finishing up the NW OK Marriages of 1943-44. I have also been reading some more early 1900 history from the Alva Pioneer Souvenir Edition dated January 1904. There was an article entitled The Scramble for Land and a couple of Letters to the Editor (from George Rollins and John Culver) that I thought you might like to read for yourselves.

As to the 1909 Colorado vacation photo album 1909 Glidden Auto Tour, Antlers Hotel, Colorado Springs, COof our grandmother's, I have run across a couple of pictures that show a Glidden Auto Tour of 1909 gathering at the Antler's Hotel in Colorado Springs. The photos were taken around July 27, 1909. This automobile company started from Buffalo, New York and went west as far as Denver before their return trip back to New York.

The Antlers Hotel was a majestic looking hotel located at the west-end of 1909 Antlers Hotel - colorado springs, ColoradoPike's Peak Ave., in Colorado Springs, Colo. 1909 - Looking west on Pikes Peak Ave, Colo. Springs, COThis writer is not quite sure when the Antlers Hotel was demolished but ran across a website showing the building being demolished around 1964. I understand that in 1895 there was a fire and there have been three different Antlers Hotel at that spot over the years. This photo of 1909 shows the second Antlers Hotel. If some of you readers from out around that area could fill us in, that would be great.

Did you know... that the Legion Heights sub-division south of Alva, Oklahoma was once a veteran housing addition during the WWII days? One of our readers of the OkieLegacy.org was reminiscing and dropped me a line and mentioned that bit of info. Diana's email is listed in the Mailbag Corner below.

What is our destiny? This quote by William Jennings Bryan might say it all, "Destiny is not a matter of chance, it's a matter of choice. It is not a thing to be waited for, it's a thing to be achieved."

Here is to our troops fighting over in Iraq. May our support and prayers be with them all. See you all next weekend. If you have any Okie Legacies or thoughts to share, send them along.

~~ Linda "oaKie" ~~

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Oakie's NW Corner

NW Okie (Linda)

Vol 5, Iss 8 OKC, Oklahoma -

It won't be long now before the winds blow across our heartland state as February ends and March begins.

Thanks to Y'all that have written in to say how much you enjoy receiving our weekly ezine/newsletter. Many of you have said many times how much you appreciate what we are doing on the internet. Some of you have even made connections and discoveries from time to time from what we have included here on our site. You have even mentioned, "What you are doing is a public service."

We at OkieLegacy.org and The Okie Legacy Ezine thank you all for your encouragements, contributions and inquiries that make this OkieLegacy Ezine what it is today and every Friday evening. We couldn't do it without you! We Thank you for all your comments!

For some of you that have missed certain issues of The Okie Legacy Ezine, you can catch up on those missed issues in our Okie Legacy Journal Archives where you can browse all five (5) Volumes.

More NW Pioneer Tidbits... We have gathered more Northwest Pioneers to share with everyone this week. We have found the first couple married in "M" county, in Oklahoma Territory - early public schools of Alva; U. S. Land office - H. E. Noble Trade Parade float taken on 31 May 1900 to celebrate Free Homes Day in Alva - More NW Pioneers and NW OK marriages of 1943 .

Early Public Schools of Alva, Oklahoma... Early Public Schools of Alva, Okla.Here are two of the public schools of Alva: West School building and the East School building (erected in 1901). The West School building was the first brick school building in District #1, in Woods county. The first meeting to elect a school board was held the first week in March, 1894, and after discussing the situation, adjourned to Saturday, March 17. At this meeting A. H. Beegle was elected director, G. W. Snyder, treasurer, and C. W. Hobbie was elected clerk. On April 9th, a three months term of school was begun in the Union church, with John C. Beaty and Miss Josie Randall as teachers. But the church was too small for both teachers, and Miss Randall taught in a building that stood where Fredrickson's Livery Barn once stood. That building was moved afterwards and used by Louis Miller as an undertaking room, and he was still using it for that purpose in 1904.

The Alva Pioneer Souvenir Edition printed in January, 1904 stated, "At the annual school meeting in July, S. L. Johnson and F. E. Hatch succeeded Messrs. Beegle and Hobbie on the board. The new board called an election to vote bonds to the amount of $2,800.00 and it was voted on Sept. 24, 1894. On Dec. 10 the contract for the above building, to contain four large rooms and be built of brick, was let to T. B. Bowman. Mr. Bowman and several assistants got the building nearly completed, when on the morning of Dec. 20th (1894), the building was destroyed by fire, the origin of which has always been a mystery. It was rebuilt, and in 1900 and two more rooms were added."

West Side of Square - 1895... West side of Alva Square - 1895, college Ave. This west side of square photo was taken from the Alva Pioneer Souvenir Edition dated 1904 and shows the west side of the square (6th Street, College Ave.) as it looked in 1895. The Bank of Alva, first bank in the city, was opened for business on November 13, 1893, by Eli P. Williams, from McPherson, Kansas, with his son Elmer being cashier. It was a few months afterwards it was succeeded by the Exchange Bank which was in 1904 the First National Bank, whose building once stood where the old one was. The old building was moved to the south side of the square and was owned and occupied by Dr. J. C. Herron, dentist, and Mrs. Herron, photographer.

More 1904 Pioneer Tidbits...

  • The first suicide in Alva was F. T. Sykes, who took morphine December 15, 1894, in his room where the Alva State Bank building first existed.
  • The first brick building in Alva was the county jail in the public square.
  • B. T. Woodard started the first livery stable in Alva, Sept. 16, 1893. In 1902, it was still the Woodard's Hotel De Horse, run by A. S. Woodard, but B. T. Woodard moved to Rogers, Arkansas around 1902.
  • A. L.Circle was Alva's first drayman. Circle came here Sept. 16, 1903.
  • Dec. 18, 1893, the townsite board completed its final report to the US Land department. On January 4, 1894, they began issuing deeds for lots.
  • Miss A. B. Young, from Anthony, Kansas, was the first to open a Millinery store in Alva, Dec. 1893.
  • Dec. 18, 1893 the first organization of a "Push" club was perfected. Percy R. Smith was chairman, and W. S. Fallis, secretary. The first business of the Push club was to look after the public roads out of Alva.
  • The first county jail was built in October, 1893. Two by four lumber was laid flat and nailed solidly, one on top of another 10 by 12 feet. In 1904 it was being used as the city Jail.

OkieLegacy 100k Milestone Approaching Soon... Sometime this next week our "OkieLegacy.org" visitor-counter will reach that "100,000" milestone. We have been keeping close track for the last few months and watching the number of visitors climb by 1500-1600 per week. We were thinking about when we started in this world-wide-web business around eight years ago (Fall of 1995). Back then we would be lucky to get 25 visitors per week. The years and search engines have been good to us. We've met some great friends - found lots of new cousins and learned a lot, too.

We have been trying to figure out how to celebrate that turning-point just on the horizon -- wondering when it will hit that golden, six-figure mark. Will it be on this writer's birthday, Tuesday, 25th of February? What day, hour will it occur? Who will be that lucky "100,000" Visitor? Have you got any suggestions of how to celebrate? Will you help us count down to 100k next week? Email us and let us know what the counter was when you dropped by our website! Thanks!

Before we let you head off to explore more of our NW Oklahoma pioneers, we need to make a request and inquiry concerning a WWII army hospital that was located in Chickasha, Oklahoma -Borden General Army Hospital. Does anyone out there have any information concerning the Borden General Hospital? Jimmie Biggs - Email: jbiggs3@cox.net - is looking for resource information on the subject matter.

Do NOT allow the terrorism to create panic throughout our communities. You control your own destiny!

Be Forceful, BUT... Speak Gently!

"Speak gently! It is better far
To rule by love than fear;
Speak gently; let no harsh words mar
The good we might do here!"
~~ by author - David Bates (1809-1870) - Speak Gently ~~

See you next weekend, the first of that windy month of March!

~~ Linda "oaKie" ~~

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Oakie's NW Corner

NW Okie (Linda)

Vol 5, Iss 7 OKC, Oklahoma - Last Friday's snowfall brought maybe two or three inches on the ground up in Northwest Oklahoma, but I hear it didn't last long. More of a soaker, I guess, and we needed that. After Saturday, the Spring-like weather has been shining across the state with promise of rain showers to come in Thursday. Those showers didn't amount to much in the Northwest.

Friday, Valentines Day brought more spring-like temperatures in the high 70s and low 80s. That's our NW Corner Weather report for the week as we move on to some more Okie Tidbits.

July, 1933 Kidnapping of Charles F. Urschel -- Wednesday night a local news station had a piece on Machine Gun's lost loot: search continues for gangster's ransom money. It was July 22, 1933 that Machine Gun Kelly and and his gang kidnapped Charles Urschel at the oil tycoon's home in Oklahoma City, in Heritage Hills. The FBI uncovered over half of the $200,000 ransom money, but it is alleged that $90,000 was never found and is assumed buried someplace in the hills near Oklahoma City and all-points west. Whatever happened to Machine Gun's wife, Kathryn, after she was released from prison in 1958? Did she know where the money was buried?

Here is the article, "....On Jan. 17, 1954, his birthday, Machine-Gun Kelly died of a heart attack in the federal prison at Leavenworth. In 1958, Kathryn Kelly's trial was reopened. Her attorney contended that during the first trial, she was not allowed to bring in her own handwriting expert to counter the prosecution's virtuoso, who testified she had written threatening notes to the Urschels after their arrest. When the Justice Department declined to turn over its files from the original trial, Kathryn was freed on bond. The second trial never came off. Kathryn lived under a stream of false identifications and vanished into nothingness. Her contribution to history was that she invented Machine-Gun Kelly, an enormously profitable Hollywood commodity. Once the case was closed, Jones and his men concentrated their efforts on finding the $200,000 ransom money, which had been divided, scattered and buried around the hills of Oklahoma City and all-points west. They found some of it, but, according to Division of Investigation records, some $100,000 is still buried somewhere. Kelly also robbed banks throughout Mississippi, Oklahoma, New Mexico and Texas. Some $38,000 taken from the Citizen's Bank in Tupelo is thought to be buried just outside of town..... The Treasure: A large number of caches, most notably, $100,000 in $20 bills from the kidnapping and another $38,000 from the Tupelo, Miss., bank robbery." -- Of Mice and G-Men by Ralph Michael, from pg. 50 of the January issue of Treasure Cache magazine. - losttreasure.com

Finding the Treasure -- They report that much of the loot from Kelly's many robberies is probably buried near the site of the crimes. You can contact the Oklahoma Historical Society and Oklahoma City Public Library, both located in Oklahoma City, for more information on Machine Gun Kelly's activities.

More 1904 Alva, O. T. Tidbits -- Maybe some of these little tidbits will jog some more memories out there. We love hearing and sharing your Okie memories in our free weekly Okie Legacy newsletter. Keep them coming!

The first death in Alva was that of Mrs. Susan Little, aged 28 years, Sept. 26, 1893; buried near the river and afterward moved to the AOUW Cemetery -- Hon. D. T. Flynn's first visit to Alva after the opening, was on Nov. 12, 1893 -- February, 1894, The Alva Pioneer was urging everybody to make a preparations for planting trees. -- The Alva Pioneer building, size 20x40 feet, the first new two-story house in Alva. The Pioneer printing plant was moved into the upper rooms in October, 1893 just as soon as a roof was on the building, and G. W. Drake and wife from Hazelton, Ks., opened a restaurant in the lower rooms. The Pioneer was published for 10 years in this building and grew from a small weekly to a healthy daily paper.

A Galaxy of Great Names -- "A case tried in one of our local NW Oklahoma courts here in an early 1900s, presents an interesting meeting of notables as follows; The judge who presided was Franklin Pierce Alexander, the plaintiff was Daniel Webster Artley, the defendant Benjamin Franklin Goff; two of the witnesses were Ulysses Grant Goff and Andrew Jackson; counsel for the defendant were Walter Scott Prickett and George Washington Vickers, while the plaintiff was represented by Jesse James Dunn."

Maybe some of you have noticed that the NW OK Marriages has moved to two pages because of the overload. If you want to view the 1940 thru 1950 marriages, you can Click NW OK Marriages 1940-50. The 1930s-1939 marriages can still be viewed at NW OK Marriages 1930s-39.

Too much to share with you all this weekend, so before I overload your memory circuits and mailboxes -- I am out of here to enjoy the St. Valentines weekend. See Y'all next week around the same time.

Happy St. Valentines Day Weekend!

~~ Linda "oaKie" ~~
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Oakie's NW Corner

NW Okie (Linda)

Vol 5, Iss 5 OKC, Oklahoma - I suppose you all made it through the Super Bowl weekend of commercials and the snowstorms in the northeast USA. The weather here in Oklahoma still changes every three or four days from Spring to Winter to Spring and back to Winter again. The head cold is gone, though!

I have spent this week browsing through an old June 25, 1950, Alva Review Courier this week and found some goodies to share. One of those goodies was a 1950 Political Ad for State Senator that my Dad, Gene McGill, had placed on page 9 of that newspaper. It read as follows, "Let's Elect Gene McGill Democrat for State Senator, Woods-Woodward Counties."

On that same page was a marriage announcement of the 21 June 1950 marriage of M. Felicia Monfort, MD to Robert L. McGill. I also found an Ad for Monfort's Drug Store advertising fireworks, night displays for homes, safe sane fireworks for children and fireworks headquarters at Monfort Drug Store.

If you turn to page 12 of that same paper, you would find MORE Political Announcements, "Lt. Gov. James E. Berry, Democrat; US State Senator - Elmer Thomas, Democrat; State Senator - Claude Davis (Democrat), Gene M. McGill (Democrat), J. G. Jim Powers (Repub.); State Rep. - Ben Easterly, Democrat; District Judge - Tom Hieronmus (Democrat), Fred Spellman (Repub.); County Comm. Dist. 1 - W. C. Bill Romjue (Democrat), J. M. Jay Wert (Democrat); County Comm. Dist. 2 - Frank Nickelson (Repub.), J. F. Remiattee (Democrat); Court Clerk - Wesley Everett Ellison (Democrat), Orvel E. Brown (Democrat).

While I was transcribing the NW OK Marriages this week I found several of the couples that had graduated from Horace Mann High School and Northwestern High School. I assume at one time that those were names of the high schools in NW Oklahoma and Alva. If anyone out there has any information concerning these high schools in NW Oklahoma, please share it with us here. Thanks!

Check out the 1934 Seniors of Lamont High School - Read about the early 1900s Cimarron Valley Clipper Editor, Clarence & Grace Wandell, that a lady sent to me recently - And ... Someone is looking for information, origins of "Chocolate Gravy" for a speech project. If any of this week's newsletter jogs some more memories out there, I would love to hear from you all!

This weekend we celebrated the Chinese New Year and it is that time of year when that famous Ground Hog does/not peek his/her head outside his home (Sunday, Feb. 2, 2002). Will we have six more weeks of Winter? Is Spring just around the corner?

From Listen to the People by Stephen Vincent Benet -
"..... All one, all indivisible and one
Find it and keep it and hold on to it,
For there's a buried thing in all of us,
Deeper than all the noise of the parade,
The thing the haters never understand
And never will, the habit of the free....."

Soar like the Eagle - Be not afraid of the storm! Be as strong! Be smart enough to soar above it! See you all next weekend with more Okie Legacy goodies. ~~ Linda "oaKie" ~~
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Oakie's NW Corner

WWII POW caps - OK Map

Vol 5, Iss 2 OKC, Oklahoma -

The cold winter winds having been blowing across Oklahoma this week reminding us that it is still Winter, BUT... the sun has been shining. You just had to hang on to things when venturing outside. *Smiling*

Thanks to you all who sent heartfelt condolences concerning the death of my horse, Moon. I really do appreciate hearing from you and everything you have to share with us at The Okie Legacy. You are Wonderful and GREAT!

I have been keeping busy transcribing some information passed down to me by one of my readers. It concerns the WWII POW Camps in Oklahoma - 1943-45. Click the Oklahoma Map on the left to catch a better glimpse of the POW camps that dotted our State. You can read more about the Barbed Wire & Nazilagers POW Camps in Oklahoma written by Richard S. Warner, a free lance writer in Tulsa who has been collecting information on POW camps for many years. - printed in The Chronicles of Oklahoma, Vol. LXIV, No. 1, Spring 1986.

I am going to keep this short this week because there are lots of things to read in the newsletter: NW OK Marriages of 1941, WWII POW Camps in Oklahoma, Wiley H. Cowan Obit, Home Comfort Range, Old Alva Photos (help find a home) and many other family inquiries. Speaking about the Old Alva Studio Photos ... I have also stuck them on Oakie's Webshots in an Album of their own and will be adding more later. If you have any Old Photos to add, Email Linda a jpg file. Thanks!

Before I send you off to explore ... Nadine from Germany, lived in Oklahoma for 11 months and is now studying English at an University in Germany and is working on a Presentation of the History of Oklahoma. If anybody could help her, contact Nadine at N.Holtrup@t-online.de.

~ No matter what you read or hear ~ The Eagle Still Soars Above It All! ~~ Linda "Okie" ~~

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Okie's NW Corner

NW Okie (Linda)

Vol 5, Iss 1

The beginning of another year. OU (Oklahoma University) Sooners brought home the Rose Bowl trophy to Norman and Oklahoma with a 34-14 win over Washington State. 2003 gives us another year to gather more Okie Legacies and hear more of your memory jogging histories.

Someone wrote and inquired about, "How many Pro-Baseball leagues there were in 1904." I do not have the answer to this and thought maybe some of you out there could help find the answer.

Another reader wrote in concerning his GG-Grandfather, Wiley Cowan. It seems that Tom Dyer wrote a poem about Wiley Cowan that appeared in the obit in the Alva paper in November of 1935. If anyone has a copy of that 1935 Obituary to share, send it this way. Also, Wiley Cowan was a superintendant of the Eagle Chief Pool Ranch - foreman of the Schlupp Balinger Ranch; and the first whiteman to travel the Old Cantonment Trail. I was looking back at some of my "Fairvalley Legacies" and found the following little tidbit that I had gotten from Wilma Terrill that she compiled in 1997...

".....Mart Benson was an old timer who worked for Wiley Cowan and followed the trail a long time. At one time he wintered on Anderson Creek, then he homesteaded where Iva and Virgil Murrow lived....."

Before I end here and send you to explore some more NW OK Marriages dating from 1940-41, I have to mention here that the beginning of this week brought sad news the morning we left Colorado Rockies to head back home to Oklahoma.

It was early Monday morning, 30th of December 2002, that we received a call that my two year old black gelding (Moon) was found dead in his stall at a trainer's near Shawnee, Oklahoma. We haven't heard the results of the autopsy yet, but we are told that Moon was a bit nervous. I have to tell you this, though... He wasn't use to being confined in a stall and has had the pasture to roam in most of his almost three years.

Some may say he was just another animal, but to me he was like a member of the family. We took our first steps into learning about horses with each other. He sent me to Parelli's horse camp in Pagosa Springs, Colorado the first week in May, 2002 for a week so I could learn his language.

To me he was a priceless family member that greeted me everytime I walked into his pasture. I will not forget him or the first time I put a halter on him and lead him around the corral. I will not forget the first time I put a saddle on him and had to get me a stepping stool to reach the stirrups to set in the saddle. Then there was the time I was riding him in the pasture and he stopped short and flipped me off his back and I landed on my backside out in front of him -- still holding on to the reins. He just stood there while I caught my breathe -- stood up and walked him back to the corrall.

To leave you on a happier note... May your hopes, dreams become reality - May they be everything you want them to be for 2003. See you all next weekend around the same time... or earlier!

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Looking Back ... 40 Years Ago Today

Vol 11, Iss 29 What were you doing 40 years ago today, July 20, 1969, Sunday? Were you one of 500 million people that were seated in front of a television set, mesmerized by the continuous television coverage of the lunar module's descent toward the moon's cratered surface?

To many of those 500 million TV viewers the idea of a landing on the moon an almost unimaginable. Though, we were also intrigued with a television series that was also on television in 1969, "Star Trek."

This NW Okie was 21 years-old, single, junior college student attending Summer school at Northwestern State College, in Alva, Oklahoma and planning a wedding to be united in marriage ten days later (July 30th, 1969), was one of many glued to a television set at my friend Judy and her husband's house on the Eastside of Enid, Oklahoma, the evening of July 20, 1969 with my fiance.

Let us go back to the Apollo 11 Saturn V space vehicle as it lifted off at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida on July 16, 1969. It would be four days later when a scheduled moon landing created "One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind" was made by a Apollo 11 crew, Neil A. Armstrong, civilian aeronautical engineer from Ohio, as Edwin E. ?Buzz? Aldrin Jr., Air Force test pilot from New Jersey, watched from the Lunar Module. Overhead in the Apollo 11 space craft, Michael Collins, another Air Force test pilot reared in a military household and spent time living in Oklahoma, was circling the moon.

This was also a time when the Space lift offs got continuous live coverage of CBS, NBC, and ABC. and everyone was gathered around their TV sets (black & white) and radios to watch and listen as Astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin, Jr. were preparing for their lunar landing on the moon surface.

As events unfolded in space, Oklahoma Astronaut Thomas P. Stafford, a Weatherford, Oklahoma native and part of the Apollo 10 crew with Eugene Cernan, stood in Mission Control and explained each move made by the astronauts in meticulous detail to others.

At the precise moon landing, Astronaut Armstrong announced at 3:10p.m., July 20, 1969, "Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed." When Armstrong landed, he only had 17 seconds of fuel left. They were that close from aborting the mission that day.

Six hours and 40 minutes elapsed between the lunar module landing and Armstrong's appearance on the lunar module ladder. The fuzzy, black and white images were telecast worldwide via a camera mounted on the outside of the spacecraft.

On that day in Summer of '69, the streets were virtually empty in cities like Enid, Oklahoma City, Lawton and Tulsa. Theaters entertained a few stragglers. Gas station attendants sat around transistor radios. Telephone lines were silent as viewers gathered around to view and listen at 9:56 p.m., as Astronaut Armstrong lowered his bulky boot onto the moon?s chalky surface and uttered his first words: ?That?s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.?

On that July day back in the Summer of '69 many viewers jotted down in their journals, ?TODAY, JULY 20, 1969 ? AT 3:14 P.M. THE LM, LUNAR MODULE LANDED ON THE MOON. NEIL ARMSTRONG WAS THE FIRST MAN OF THE U.S. TO WALK ON A FOREIGN PLANET!?

What did you jot down in your journals on that Summer day, July 20th, 1969? Where did you watch and listen?

As our imaginations unfurled, we watched something great and gained a great deal. Did we also lose something in the process? Did we forever lose the mysteries of the moon?

NO! In this NW Okie's mind, there are still mysteries to seek and great things to accomplish as our creative minds are unleashed into outer space.

You might have heard Walter Cronkite memorable closing newsline at the end of the Moon landing story, "That's the way it was!"
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On the Road Again

Vol 9, Iss 46 Ooops!,,,, It was 2:00 a.m. when I pushed the button on my database to publish what I thought was this week's newsletter. BUT... As it turned out, that wasn't so. I think the first earlier mailing you received might have mentioned Vol. 9, Iss. 1. If this ever happens again, remember this link for the OkieLegacy Ezine frontpage and bookmark on your browser.

I'm back in SW Colorado this afternoon (2:00 p.m. MST) and getting ready to correct that first mailing by sending you out the correct Vol. 9, Iss. 46 of The OkieLegacy. What can I say? We can't be perfect all the time, huh? Besides... at 2 a.m. this morning I'm not sure what I was doing -- sleeping? Publishing?

Well! I've been to Guthrie for the Centennial festivities. This NW Okie has been singing "Oklahoma" all day Friday, Nov. 16, 2007. After Guthrie's centennial parade, we headed back to Alva, Oklahoma, in the early afternoon Friday to catch Alva's centennial celebrations. You can view NW Okie's photos of the Centennial Celebration at Centennial Celebrations.

I went to Guthrie Thursday so I could get up early and find a good parking spot close to everything on November 16, 2007. I really wanted to get some pics of the reenactment of statehood and symbolic marriage of Miss Indian and Mr. Oklahoma Territories.

I got up at 5:00 a.m. Friday morning, but didn't get out of bed until around 6:35 a.m. By 7:30 a.m. I headed to the Historical downtown area in Guthrie, Oklahoma.

I found a great parking spot within 2 blocks of the State Capitol Book building.

It was a chilly, windy Friday morning in Guthrie, Oklahoma. Some weathermen have said the temps were close to what they were 100 years ago. I layered with a down vest over a sweater and then a fleece hooded jacket. From 7:30 am to about 8:45am I did okay, but got to shaking so bad from the Oklahoma wind blowing through to my bones, that I had to find a warm spot to get out of Oklahoma's bone-chillin' wind. AND.... they didn't wait for me to get back to catch the re-enactments around 9:16 to 9:30 a.m. I missed getting pictures of that part. If anyone out there founds out where I can purchase a DVD of the re-enactment of Guthrie's Centennial, send me the information. Thanks!

BUT... by parade time, 11:30am, it had warmed up considerably and I stripped down to the down vest from 11:30 am to about 1:30PM.

This NW Okie made it back to Alva a little after 4:00 p.m. in time to check out Alva's celebrations -- bid on a Western painting, "Shallow Waters", painted by Larry Case and donated to the Cherokee Strip Museum Association. Yes! I won the bid!

It is getting late while we on the road back to the Colorado Rockies. These tired eyes look towards the clock and see that it is way past midnight and no longer Saturday anymore -- but Sunday, November 18, 2007. Before I shutdown and publish this week's issue, let me leave you with one of my favorite quotes from the musical, "Oklahoma" where Aunt Eller sings in the song, "The Farmer & The Cowhand Should Be Friends:" "I don't say I'm no better than anybody else, But I'll be damned if I ain't jist as good!."

Happy 100th Birthday, Oklahoma! We've been to Guthrie, Oklahoma and back to Alva on this Centennial day for Oklahoma -- gathering centennial celebration pictures of our "On the Road Again" travels. Thanks, Oklahoma and Oklahomans, past, present and future, for a GREAT Centennial! I tip my hat to the 1st Capitol of Oklahoma (Guthrie) for their outstanding, hardwork in putting together Oklahoma's Centennial celebration! HAPPY Thanksgiving to all -- next Thursday! View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


Back Home Again

Vol 9, Iss 16 This NW Okie is happy to report that she made it back to southwest Colorado, Friday afternoon with enough time to unload, rest up and pet on her pugs while they gave me their special pug kisses.

AND... Saturday afternoon brought thunder storms and graupel to the valley south of Bayfield, Colorado. Also, I noticed that the SW Colorado gas prices were the same as when I left for Oklahoma (thirty-cents higher than Oklahoma's gas prices).

I had the pleasure to met one of our "OkieLegacy" readers while I was at the Shawnee Horse Expo Center in Shawnee, Oklahoma last Saturday. I guess that is just one of the many things that recharges my energy... getting to met some of you out there. Thanks, Jan, for stopping by and looking me up at the Horse Expo Center. It was great meeting, talking to you and your mother.

While I was in Oklahoma City at the History Center (pictured above, on the left), I found some interesting 1924 information to share with you all in the coming weeks as we venture back to the year 1903, 1907 and 1924 in northwest Oklahoma and across the state.

This NW Okie really got lucky and was able to find the full date of the 1924 family farm house fire that took the life of four members of the Osborne family, January 4, 1924 on their farm about 18 miles northwest of Alva, near the Winchester, Oklahoma area. That information is according to the news articles that I found in the local newspapers ("The Alva Record" and "The Daily Alva Review-Courier") of 1924.

All we had to go on was the year. I thought it would be similar to finding a needle in a haystack, BUT... that was not the case. I pulled the 1924 "The Daily Alva Review-Courier," dated January 4, 1924 on microfilm and there was the big headline, spread across the front page, "2 Die, 1 Fatally Burned In Winchester Fire." It jumped out at me and stared me in the face.

As I read closer, I realized that I had found what I was looking for on the first try. Something that local libraries would not do without a full date. Anyway, we have stuck the Osborne obituaries below in the Mailbag Section, with a summary of the fatal farm house fire of 1924.

New Column for OkieLegacy... This week we will be starting a new column entitled "Okielegacy Centennial Moment" to help mark the 100th anniversary of Oklahoma & Indian Territories merging marriage to become the 46th state, November 16, 1907.

If you have any family centennial stories to share, we would love to include them in our OkieLegacy centennial moments. Please email your stories and photos to NW Okie at paristimes@hughes.net. Thanks for your support!

Happy 58th Birthday to Amber McGill Colon this weekend, Saturday, April 21st!
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NW OK Marriage 1943-44

Vol 5, Iss 13 Alva, Oklahoma -

Hackett-Jones - Sunday, 5 September 1943, Fort Worth, Texas - Miss Hazel Jane Hackett To Wed Mr. William E. Jones September 5 - Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Hacket, 224 College, announce the engagement and approaching marriage of their daughter, Miss Hazel Jane Hackett, to William E. Jones, son of Mrs. Henry Jones of Tulia, Tex., on Sunday, September 5 at the Hemphill Presbyterian church, Fort Worth, Tex. The Rev. J. Hoytt Boles will perform the ceremony.

Estle-Hurt -- Sunday, 1944 - Miss Maydine Estle, Rev. Lloyd Hurt Married in Friends Church Sunday - In an evening ceremony Sunday in the Friends church, Miss Maydine Estle, daughter of Charles Estle and Mrs. Carrie Estle, became the bride of the Rev. Lloyd Hurt, son of Mrs. Bertha Hurt, Enid. The Rev. Lela Gordon read the double ring ceremony at 9 p.m. in the presence of a large group of friends and relatives.

Whitsett-Cappell - Monday, 1944, Alva, Okla. - Helen Whitsett, Joy Cappell Wed in Enid - Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Whitsett of Enid, announce the marriage of their daughter, Miss Helen Louise Whitsett to PFC Joy Cappell, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Linton of Alva. The marriage took place at the home of the bride, 709 N. Seventh St., Monday evening at 6 p.m. with the Rev. D. Lonigan, pastor of the Westminister Presbyterian church in Enid, reading the single-ring ceremony.

Hoch-Overocker - 1944, Columbus, Ohio - Miss Mary Evelyn Hoch, Ensign D. J. Overocker Wed - Ceremony at Groom's Station, Columbus, O. - Mrs. Evelyn Hoch announces the marriage of her daughter, Miss Mary Evelyn Hoch, to Ensign Donald Jay Overocker, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. D. J. Overocker, Coldwater, Kans. The wedding took place in Columbus, Ohio, where the bridegroom is stationed with the ferry command of the Navy air corps.

Racey-Peters - Thursday, 11 May 1944, Phoenix, Arizona - Dorothy Jean Racey Weds Army Sergeant - Announcement has been received of the marriage of Miss Dorothy Jean Racey, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Racey of Santa Ana, Calif., to Staff Sergeant James Earl Peters. The wedding was an event of Thursday, May 11, in Phoenix, Arizona. The Raceys are former residents of Alva. Mrs. Peters attended elementary and high school her.

Hughes-Hiatt - Saturday, 25 May 1945, Norman, Okla. - Lieut. (jg) Mack Hiatt Weds Norman Girl Saturday Evening - Lieut. (jg) Mack Hiatt, Jr., USNR, son of MR. and Mrs. Mack Hiatt, Lubbock, Tex., and Miss Mary Hughes, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roland F. Hughes, Norman, were married Saturday evening in the First Baptist church in Norman.

Keys-Anderson - 9 June 1944, Oklahoma City, Okla. - Last of Keys Quads to Wed - Oklahoma City, May 25 AP - Mary Keys, the last unmarried member of Oklahoma's beautiful celebrated quadruplet sisters, will march to the altar June 9 to climax a romance that began a year ago at Camp Hood, Tex., shortly after she became an army hostess. She will be married to Sergt. Jack P. Anderson of Plano, Tex., former Baylor University and New York Giants football player. Announcement of their engagement was made here by Miss Keys' parents, Mr. and Mrs. Flake M. Keys.

Ney-Isenbart - Thursday, 10 August 1944, Hanston, Kans. - Marie Ney, Fredrick Isenbart Married Thursday at Hanston - Miss Marie Ney of Hanston, Kans., and Frederick Joseph Isenbart, of Alva, were united in marriage at the St. Anthon's Catholic church, Hanston, Kans., on August 10, at 9 a.m. The nuptial high mass was officiated by Rev. Anthony Isenbart, brother of the groom, and served by Bernard and Larry Isenbart, nephews of the groom.

Nickell-Barkley - Saturday, 26 August 1944, Alva, Okla. - Nuptials of Olive Nickell and bill Barkley Read Saturday Night - In the First Methodist church Saturday evening, Rev. G. R. Vaughn, pastor of the First Christian church, performed the wedding ceremony which united Miss Olive Nickell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Nickell, 727 Maple St., and Bill Barkley, son of Mr. and Mrs. Guy Barkley, College Campus.

Simms-Ogletree - Sunday, 5, September 1944, Deming, New Mexico - Miss Lucille Simms-Cadet Vincent Ogeltree Wed In New Mexico - Mr. and Mrs. O. O. Simms, 1027 Maple Street, announce the marriage of their daughter, Lucille, to a/c Vincent Ogletree, son of Mrs. Hazel Willaman, Oregon. The wedding took place Sunday, September 5, o'clock at Deming, New Mexico, in the First Baptist church with the Rev. Colson reading the double ring ceremony.

Shirey-Glover - Saturday, 25 December 1944 - Church Ceremony Unites Miss Shirey, Ensign Glover - Miss Faith Ann Shirey, and Ensign George Edward Glover, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Glover, Dallas, were married Saturday in the First Methodist church. The Rev. Grady N. Ross officiated, using the double-ring ceremony.

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NW OK Marriage 1943

Vol 5, Iss 11 Oklahoma -

Hort-Holding - Thursday, May, 1943, Alva, Okla. - Hort-Holding Vows Read In Alva Thursday - Miss Anna Hort, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hort, Sr., east of Alva, was married to PFC. Bill O. Holding, son of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Holding, Marshal, Thursday evening at the Lutheran parsonage in Alva. The Rev. Otto Hoyer performed the double-ring ceremony.

Phelps-Bicknell - Sunday, June, 1943 - Miss Phelps Bride-Elect of Brooks Bicknell - Dr. and Mrs. Joseph T. Phelps of El Reno announce the engagement and forthcoming marriage of their daughter, Miss Mary Margaret Phelps, to Brooks H. Bicknell of Oklahoma city, son of Mr. and Mrs. B. H. Bicknell, Alva. The wedding will be an event of early June.

Kinzie-Kightlinger - Thursday, 10 June 1943, Amarillo, Tex. - Wanda Kinzie Is Bride of Pvt. Kightlinger - Mr. and Mrs. Guy E. Kinzie announce the marriage of their daughter, Miss Wanda Berlene Kinzie, to Pfc. Robert L. Kightlinger, son of Mr. and Mrs. Emmett Kightlinger of Quinlan, Okla., Thursday, June 10, in Amarillo, Tex. The single-ring ceremony was read by the Rev. R. N. Huckabee, in the 10th Avenue Methodist church at 3 p.m.

Glasgow-Tate - Friday, 2 July 1943, Hugo, Okla. - Glasgow, Tate Vows Exchanged - Mr. and Mrs. Earl Glasgow of Dacoma announce the marriage of their daughter, Miss Dana Maxine Glasgow, to Pvt. Glenard Mack Tate, Friday, July 2, at Hugo, Okla. The Rev. C. W. Lester read the nuptial vows in the First Methodist church.

Deusinger-Thilsted - Saturday, 24 July 1943, Denver, Colo. - Wanda Deusinger, John Thilsted married Saturday in Denver, Colo. - In a quiet ceremony Saturday at the First Baptist church in Denver, Colo., Miss Wanda Marie Deusinger, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. N. F. Deusinger, 1028 Flynn, became the bride of John P. Thilsted, son of Mr. and Mrs. P. C. Thilsted, near Alva.

Hunter-Milton - Tuesday, 10 August 1943, Enid, Okla. - Hunter, Milton vows Exchanged August 10 - Announcement has been made of the marriage of Mrs. Nellie Hunter, Alva, and Mr. Ed Milton, Alva, which took place Tuesday, August 10, at 3:30 p.m. in the sanctuary of the Christian church at Enid. Rev. Sours read the single ring ceremony.

Milton-Faulkner - Sunday, 15 August 1943, Anthony, Kansas - Mrs. Verna Milton Becomes Bride of Felix Faulkner - Announcement has been made of the marriage of Mrs. Verna Milton, Alva, and Felix Faulkner, Alva. The wedding took place in the Methodist church Sunday August 15, in Anthony, Kansas, at 4 p.m. with Rev. Victor A. Major reading the single ring ceremony.

Fettke-Allen - Thursday, 16 September, 1943, Madison, Wisconsin - Norma Belle Fettke Becomes Bride of Cpl. Dale Allen - Announcement is made of the marriage of Miss Norma Belle Fettke, daughter of Mrs. Vera Fettke, Alva, to Cpl. Dale Allen, son of Mr. and Mrs. Burr Allen, Alva, Thursday, September 16, at Madison, Wisconsin.

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NW OK Marriage 1943

Vol 5, Iss 10 Oklahoma -

Meixner-Harney - Wednesday,1943, Alva, Okla. - Elizabeth Meixner Married To Ensign Lew Harney Wednesday - Miss Elizabeth Meixner, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Meixner, Sr., Alva, became the bide of Ensign Lew Harney, son of Mr. and Mrs. Hal H. Harney, Hansen, Idaho, Wednesday morning at the home of the bride's mother, 922 Center. The single-ring ceremony was performed by the Rev. M.F. Langley, pastor of the First Baptist church.

Allen-Vetter - Saturday, 1943, Cherokee, Okla. - Allen-Vetter Vows Saturday - In a quiet ceremony performed in the Methodist parsonage in Cherokee, Miss Kathryn Allen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Burr Allen, became the bride of Norman Vetter, son of Mrs. Harry Vetter. The vows were read by the Rev. Roy Miller at 3 o'clock Saturday afternoon.

Delhotal-Murrow - Sunday, 1943, Alva, Okla. - Wedding Vows Read Sunday In Murrow Home - Miss Lorraine Delhotal, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Delhotal, Pampa, Texas; and Max Murrow, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clay Murrow, Alva; were married in a quiet ceremony Sunday morning at 9 o'clock in the Murrow home, 709 Eighth St. The Rev. Lambert of the Dacoma Church of God read the nuptial vows.

Bloom-Feagins - Saturday, 3 April 1943, Grandfield, Okla. - Lowana Bloom Married To Robert Feagins - Mr. and Mrs. Orville Bloom, Wichita, Kans., announce the marriage of their daughter, Miss Lowana Bloom, to Robert T. Feagins, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Feagins, Blackwell, Okla., Saturday, April 3, in the parsonage of the First Baptist church, Grandfield, Okla. The Rev. James E. Smart performed the single-ring ceremony.

Kunzman- Kletke - 17 May 1943 - Party Given To Honor Newly Wed Couple - A housewarming party was given Wednesday evening in honor of Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Kletke, who returned recently from their wedding trip to Taos, N. M. The party was given by relatives and friends at the bridal couple's newly established home, 721 Flynn. Mrs. Kletke, the former Mrs. Hannah Kunzman, and Mr. Kletke were married. May 17, in the home of the bride. The Rev. Otto Hoyer of the Lutheran church read the nuptial vows using the double-ring ceremony.

McBee-Batchelder - Sunday, 6 June 1943, Wichita Falls, Tex. - McBee-Bachelder Vows Exchanged In Wichita Falls Sunday Morning - Wedding vows were taken at dawn Sunday morning before a white archway covered with pink roses and greenery in the Central Church of the Nazarene in Wichita Falls, Tex., by Miss Laura Eunice McBee of Wichita Falls and Pfc. Kenneth Lee Batchelder of Sheppard Field and Alva, Okla.. The Rev. Arthur A. Miller read the ceremony assisted by the groom's father, P. A. Batchelder of Alva.

Clark-Meyer - 14 September, 1943 - Miss Jesse Clark, Leo. A. Meyer Wed September 14 - A marriage of interest to their friends is that of Miss Jessie Clark, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Clark, Alva, and Leo A. Meyer, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Meyer, Alva.

Meskimen-Welty (handwritten above article - Freedom 2-16-42)... A marriage of much interest to their many friends was that of Mrs. Ruby Meskimen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Wilson, and Ellsworth Welty, son of Mr. and Mrs. Nove Welty, which was solemnized at Coldwater, Kansas, Sunday, with Judge M. M. Cosby officiating. The bride wore a street length dress of blue, with black accessories. Pete Welty, brother of the groom, and Miss Grace Keon of Woodward were the only attendants. Mr. and Mrs. Welty, who will make their home on the Ruby Eden ranch, east of town, have many friends here who extend congratulations to the happy couple.

Riggs-Murrow (handwritten above article - Dacoma 2-20-42)... Wedding vows were exchanged between Miss Delores Riggs and Dean Murrow at high noon Sunday in the home of the bridegroom's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Luther Murrow. About 4 o'clock the young couple left for Wichita, Kansas, where they will make their home. Dean has employment with the Cessna Airplane factory.

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NW OK Marrigage 1943

Vol 5, Iss 9 Oklahoma -

Leatherman-Terbush - Sunday, 1943 - Miss Leatherman Becomes Bride of Don Terbush - Miss Melva Leatherman, daughter of Mrs. D. L. Leatherman, Alva, became the bride of Don Terbush, Alva, Sunday afternoon in the Christian church parsonage. The Rev. G. R. Vaughan read the nuptial vows.

Jones-Cooper - Sunday, 1943, Alva, Okla. - Jones-Cooper Wedding Vows Read Sunday in First Christian Church- Miss Edna Faye Jones, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Jones, southwest of Alva, became the bride of Ralph Cooper, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Cooper, Wichita, Kansas, at 4 o'clock Sunday afternoon in the First Christian church here. The Rev. G. R. Vaughan performed the single ring ceremony.

Hyde-Kirk - Friday, 1943 - Miss Ella Louise Hyde, Neil Kirk Exchange Vows in Home Ceremony - Miss Ella Louise Hyde, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Hyde, southwest of Alva, became the bride of Neil Kirk, son of Mrs. W. T. Peters of Alva, at 12 noon, Friday.

Hartman-McKee - Friday, 15 January 1943, Alva, Okla. - Mildred Hartman Becomes Bride of dick McKee January 15 - Announcement has been made of the marriage of Miss Mildred Hartman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Hartman, Hillsdale, to Duane McKee, son of Mr. and Mrs. Dick McKee, Waldron, Kansas. The single ring ceremony was read at four o'clock Friday, January 15, in the Methodist church parsonage with Rev. G. A. Parkhurst, pastor, officiating.

Veselka-Eggstein - 28 January 1943, Taylor, Tex. - Veselka-Eggstein Vows Read In Catholic Church at Taylor, Tex. - The marriage of Miss Elsie Anne Veselka of Taylor, Texas, to Sgt. Francis J. Eggstein, son of Mr. and Mrs. Philip Eggstein, Capron, was solemnized January 28 in the St. Mary's Catholic church, Taylor. Father L. F. O'Sullivan performed the double-ring ceremony.

Hutton-Gruber - Saturday, 13 February 1943, Frederick, Okla. - June Hutton Becomes Bride of Phil Gruber - Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Hutton of Frederick announce the marriage of their daughter, Miss June Marie Hutton, to Mr. Phillip F. Gruber, son of Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Gruber of Alva, Saturday, February 13, at Frederick, Rev. Jacob C. Foster read the nuptial vows.

Yarbrough-Saville - 21 February 1943, Boise City - Kay Yarbrough Married To Sgt. Saville - Miss Kathrine Yarbrough, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Theo Yarbrough of Boise City, was married to Sgt. Kenneth Saville in the home of her parents at noon February 21.

Rodkey-Hall - Saturday, February 27, 1943 - Rodkey-Hall Double-Ring Ceremony Solemnized in Oklahoma City - Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Rodkey of Alva announce the marriage of their daughter, Miss Alice Joyce Rodkey, to Jack Lee Hall, Norman, at 4 p.m. Saturday, February 27, in the First Christian church in Oklahoma City. The Rev. Roy Alexander performed the double-ring ceremony before the fireplace in the pastor's study.

Nevitt-Nordlund - Saturday, 6 March 1943, Wichita, Kans. - Gayle Nevitt Married To Carl Nordlund - Miss Gayle Nevitt, daughter of Mrs. O. D. Nevitt, Seattle, Wash., was married to Mr. Howard E. Nordlund, son of Mr. and Mrs. Carl B. Nordlund, Boston, Mass., Saturday, March 6, at 7 p.m. in the vesper chapel of the St. James Episcopal church, Wichita. R. M. West read the nuptial vows.

Koenig-Callison - Saturday, 20 March 1943, Sacramento, Calif. -
Koenig-Callison Wedding Vows Read March 20 - Miss Alice Naoma Koenig, daughter of MR. and Mrs. Irwin Koenig, Sacramento, Calif., became the bride of Pvt. Hadley Spurgeon Callison, son of Mr. and Mrs. V.R. Callison, Alva, Saturday evening, March 20. The simple ceremony was performed by the Rev. Rolly E. Griffith, Richmond, Va., in the Nazarene church, Sacramento.

Thomas-Snedegar - Tuesday, March 23, 1943, Los (sic) Vegas, NV - F/O Snedegar Weds California Girl - Flight Officer John E. Snedegar, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Phoenix, Capron, was married to Miss Virginia Pearl Thomas, Bakersfield, Calif., Tuesday, March 23, in the Wee Kirk of the Heather in Los (sic) Vegas, Nevada. The Rev. Albert C. Melton performed the wedding ceremony.

Schwab-Meuschke - Monday, December 21, 1943, Silver Springs, Maryland - Miss Verda Jean Schwab Becomes Bride of Sgt. Jack L. Meuschke - Mr. and Mrs. Henry Schwab, Cherokee, announce the marriage of their daughter, Verda Jean, to Sgt. Jack L. Meuschke, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lester Meuschke, Vauglia (sic), New Mexico. The marriage took place Monday December 21, in the Methodist parsonage at Silver Springs, Maryland, with Dr. Ralph Smith officiating the single ring ceremony.

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NW OK Marrigage 1943

Vol 5, Iss 8 Oklahoma -

Wenzel-Water - 1943 - Bessie M. Wenzel to Wed Joe Water - Miss Bessie Marie Wenzel, whose engagement and approaching marriage to Joe Water is announced, is the daughter of Mr. Joe Wenzel of Alva, Okla. Mr. Joe Wenzel of Alva, Okla., announces the engagement and approaching marriage of his daughter, Bessie Marie, to Joe Water, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clements Water of Antonio, Kansas.

English-Oshel - Wednesday, 20 January 1943, Enid, Okla. - English-Oshel Vows Exchanged In Christian Parsonage at Enid - The marriage of Miss Loretta Gail English, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank R. English, Aline, to Pvt. Warren H. Oshel, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Oshel, Alva, was solemnized Wednesday evening January 20, at the Christian church parsonage, Enid. The nuptial vows were read by the Rev. Sours.

Campbell-Grunewald -- Saturday, January 23, 1943 - Mary Elizabeth Campbell, Private Ray Grunewald Exhange Vows - The marriage of Miss Elizabeth Campbell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Campbell, Alva, to Private Ray Grunewald, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Grunewald, Woodward, was solemnized Saturday, January 23, at 7 p.m. in the home of Rev. and Mrs. Amos F. Roadhouse, Burbank, California.

Chandler-Rauh - 8 August 1943, San Francisco, Calif. - LaVerne Chandler-Everett Rauh Exchange Vows In San Francisco - Mrs. Everett Rauh who, prior to her marriage to Everett Karl Rauh, in San Francisco, was the former Laverne Gladys Chandler. Mr. Rauh is stationed with the US Naval Forces in San Francisco. LaVerne Gladys Chandler and Everett Karl Rauh exchanged vows in a quiet ceremony at the St. Johns Lutheran church parsonage at San Francisco, California, on August 8, at 4 o'clock p.m.

Cupps-Paya - 9 August 1943, Enid, Okla. - Marriage of Interest Here Is Announced - An announcement of interest is made today of the marriage of Miss Lucretia Cupps, daughter of W. D. Cupps, Hennessey, to Robert E. Paya, son of Mrs. Della Paya, Alva. The wedding was solemnized Sunday, August 9, Rev. W. L.E. Shane, of Enid, officiated. -- news clipping

Chew-Smithson - Friday, 14 August 1943, Alva, Okla. - Mabel Chew-Ollie Smithson Wedding Is Announced Here - Of interest to their friends in Alva is the announcement of the marriage of Miss Mabel Chew to Mr. Ollie Lee Smithson. The wedding took place Friday, August 14, in Alva.

Clayton-Willard -- 14 August 1943, San Francisco, Calif. -
Eva Clayton Weds Merrell A. Willard - Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Clayton of Ardmore, announce the marriage of their daughter, Eva, to Merrell A. Willard, son of Mrs. Walter Cope, Waynoka. The marriage took place in the Trinity Methodist church, San Francisco, Aug. 14, with Rev. Daniel D. Walker, pastor, officiating.

Endsley-Robinson - 16 August 1943, Alva, Okla. - Mrs. John Robinson was, prior to her marriage to Mr. Robinson on August 16, in the chapel of the First Presbyterian Church, Miss Vera Endsley, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Endsley of Cleo Spring.

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NW OK Marrigage 1942

Vol 5, Iss 6 Alva, Oklahoma - Lockhart-Reccius - 11 June 1950, Hooker, Okla. - Marjorie Lockhart Weds Lloyd Reccius - Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Lockhart are announcing the marriage of their daughter, Marjorie, to Lloyd Reccius, son of the Rev. and Mrs. A. W. Reccius, Hooker, Rev. Reccius read the nuptial vows for the couple in the First Baptist church in Hooker at 4 p.m. June 11, before immediate families.

French-Kirkham - 24 June 1950, Saturday, Alva, Okla. - McArthur Home is Scene of Wedding for Frances Dean French and Richard Kirkham - Mr. and Mrs. L. L. French, Capron, announce the marriage of their daughter, Frances Dean French, to Richard Kirkham, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Kirkham of Sweetwater, Ala.

Wasson-Hall - Saturday, 25 July 1942, Wichita Falls, Texas - Wasson-Hall Marriage Is Announced Here - Announcement has been made of the marriage of Miss Laura Bess Wasson, daughter of Rev. and Mrs. A. f. Wasson, Muskogee, to Pvt. Frank Hall, son of Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Hall, Fairview. The ceremony took place late Saturday evening, July 25, at Wichita Falls, Tex., in the home of Rev. E. T. Miller, pastor of the Lamar Avenue Baptist church.

Rudy-Cinnamon - Friday, 31 July 1942 - Ruth Rudy Becomes Bride of Lee Cinnamon At Charming Ceremony - Dignity and charming simplicity marked the wedding of Miss Ruth Rudy, daughter of Mr. J. P. Rudy, to Mr. Lee Cinnamon, son of Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Cinnamon of Garber, Friday, July 31, at 9 a.m., in the home of the bride's father. This also marks the wedding anniversary of her twin sister, Mrs. Earl Geis.

Bloyd-Ware -- Sunday, August, 1942, Alva, Okla. - Bloyd-Ware Vows Exchanged - The United Brethern church of Alva was the scene of the beautiful wedding of Velma Ruth Bloyd, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. H. Bloyd, Alva, and Ernest A. Ware, son of Mr. and Mrs. N. D. Ware of Fargo at 9 o'clock Sunday morning.

Avery-Quinlan - Tuesday, September 1, 1942, Buffalo, Okla. - Avery-Quinlan Vows Are Read - Announcement has been made of the marriage of Miss Margaret Avery, daughter of Mrs. Kate Avery, Knowles, Okla., to Kenneth C. Quinlan, Waynoka. The vows were read at Buffalo, Tuesday, September 1, at 8 o'clock in the evening.

Conrod-Litton - 4 November 1942, Sherman, Texas - Miss Dorylas Conrod Is Bride of Lieut. Nate B. Litton - Marriage vows uniting Miss Dorylas Conrod daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Conrod, Ada, Oklahoma, and Lieut. Nate B. Litton, son of Mrs. N. B. Litton, Alva, Oklahoma, were exchanged November 4, at Sherman, Texas.

Harzman-Crowder - Saturday, 14 (sic) November 1942, South Bend, Ind. - Dorothy Harzman Becomes Bride of Earl Crowder November 14 - Miss Luella Harzman, Alva, announces the marriage of her niece, Miss Dorothy M. Harzman, to Earl F. Crowder, son of Mr. and Mrs. O. E. Crowder, Cherokee, Oklahoma. Mrs. Earl Crowder, South Bend, Indiana, was Miss Dorothy Harzman before her marriage Saturday evening, November 17 (sic), in the Methodist church at South Bend. She is the niece of Miss Luella Harzman, 917 Flynn, Alva, and Mr. Crowder is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Orville Crowder, Cherokee.

Gibson-Frei -15 November 1942, Wichita, Kans. - Kathryn Gibson Becomes Bride of Bethel Frei November 15 - Announcement has been made of the marriage of Miss Kathryn Gibson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bert Gibson, Goltry, Oklahoma, and Bethel Frei, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Frei, Hardtner, Kansas.

Estill-Bennett - Monday, November 16, 1942, Carrier, Okla. - Ruth Estill Becomes Bride of Lt. Bennett - Announcement is made of the marriage of Miss Ruth Estill, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Estill, Carrier, and Lieut. Virgil C. Bennett, Fort Worth, Texas, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Bennett, Drummond. The wedding took place in the Congregational church at Carrier, with Rev. Walter Ross, pastor, officiating, Monday evening, November 16. The vows were exchanged in the presence of the parents of the bride and bridegroom and a few other guests including Joan DeHaas, Mrs. Ross and daughter, Barbara.

Riecker-McKinney - Saturday, 21 November 1942, Alva, Okla. - Riecker-McKinney Vows Exchanged November 21 - Announcement has been made of the marriage of Miss Mari Riecker, daughter of Mr. Charles Riecker, Arcata, California, formerly of Capron, to Pvt. Howard E. McKinney, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. McKinney, Alva. Rev. G. R. Vaughan performed the single ring ceremony in the First Christian parsonage, Alva, Saturday, November 21, at 5:30 p.m.

Benjamin-Snyder - Sunday, November 22, 1942 - Benjamin-Snyder Nuptial Vows Read Sunday, November 22 - Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Benjamin, Alva, announce the marriage of their daughter, Rozella Mae, to Glenn E. Snyder, son of Mr. and Mrs. S. G. Snyder, Capron. Rev. G. R. Vaughan of the First Christian church read the single ring ceremony Sunday, November 22, in the church parsonage at 9:15 a.m.

Humes-Watkins -- Wednesday, 25 November 1942 - Humes-Watkins Vows Exchanged November 25 - Announcement has been made of the marriage of Miss Nora Belle Humes in the Christian parsonage Wednesday afternoon, November 25, with Rev. Ray Vaughan officiating.

Monfort-Powell -- Sunday, January, 1944, St. Louis, Mo. - Miss Monfort, Alabama Man Wed in St. Louis - Miss Felicia Monfort, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Marion Monfort, and Mr. Roy C. Powell, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Powell of Auburn, Alabama, were married Sunday afternoon in St. Louis, Mo.
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NW OK Marriages 1942

Vol 5, Iss 4 Alva, Oklahoma -

Smith-Hubbert - Sunday, 1942 - Jeanette Smith and Ford Hubbert Wed In Quiet Ceremony - In a quiet ceremony at 5:30 Sunday afternoon, Miss Jeannette Smith, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Smith, 621 Fifth Street became the bride of Ford Hubbert, son of Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Hubbert, Fargo, Okla. The wedding was held in the home of the bridegroom's parents.

Morefield-Nicola - Friday, 1942 - Morefield- Nicola Vows Are Taken Here Friday - Enid Girl Weds Alva Man in Quiet Ceremony - Simply solemnized on Friday night was the marriage of Miss Lorene Morefield, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Glen C. Morefield, 2104 West Randolph, to Stanley Nicola, son of Mrs. Lorena Nicola, Alva.

Pugh-Hagen - Saturday, 1942, Beaver, Oklahoma - Announcement has been made of the marriage of Miss Mada Pugh, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Pugh, of Balko, to Mr. Ray Hagen, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Hagen, of Carmen. The ceremony was performed at the Church of God in Beaver on Saturday evening, with Rev. B. D. Brown reading the vows. Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Pugh attended the couple.

Wares-Welsch - Sunday, 4 January 1942 - Esther Mae Wares Is the Bride of G. W. Welsch - In an impressive ceremony Sunday, January 4, 1942, at two o'clock, Miss Esther Mae Wares, Alva, became the bride of G. W. (Jack) Welsch, Ponca City, Oklahoma. The marriage vows were read in the Methodist church parsonage by Rev. G. A. Parkhurst.

Beekman-McBrinn - February 8, 1942, Oklahoma City - Miss Martha Beekman Will Become The Bride of Robert John McBrinn - The engagement and approaching marriage of Miss Martha Beekman, daughter of Mrs. Everett Agnew, Arkansas City, Kansas, and Robert John McBrinn, Alva, son of Mrs. Bonnie Nance McBrinn, Oklahoma City, has been announced.

Fry-Poorbaugh - Thursday, February 12, 1942 - A very beautiful but quiet wedding took place Thursday, February 12, 1942, at ten o'clock in the morning when Miss Irene Fry, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Fry, became the bride of Mr. Carl A. Poorbaugh, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Poorbough (sic), of Knowles, at the Methodist parsonage at Buffalo.

Norris-Kilmer - Thursday, February 19, 1942, Cherokee, Okla. - Vows Are Read for Miss Virginia Norris and Russell Kilmer Thursday in Quiet Ceremony - In a quiet ceremony at two o'clock Miss Virginia Norris, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Norris, Alva, became the bride of Russell L. Kilmer, son of Melvin Kilmer, Alva. The marriage vows were read in the Friends Church parsonage at Cherokee, Okla., Thursday, February 19, with Rev. Elmer M. Ditch, officiating. Only attendants at the wedding were Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Hensley, Jr.

Huddle-Wolgamott - March 14, 1942, Wichita Kansas - Clarice Huddle-Don Wolgamott Nuptials Are Announced Here - The marriage of Miss Clarice Jean Huddle, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. P. O. Huddle, Cherokee to Mr. Donald Dean Wolgamott, son of Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Wolgamott, Hardtner, Kansas was solemnized in the chapel auditorium of the First Methodist church, Wichita, Kansas, March 14. Dr. Tom Williams, pastor of the church, conducted the ceremony using the single ring service.

Barkley-Crenshaw, Jr. - Wednesday, March 18, 1942 - Gwendolyn Barkley Becomes Bride of Bill Crenshaw, Jr., Wednesday - Miss Gwendolyn E. Barkley, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Guy Barkley of 1202 Locust, became the bride of William T. Crenshaw, Jr., in a ceremony which took place in the Methodist parsonage by Rev. Parkhurst.

Lansdowne-Bullard - Saturday, March 26, 1942 - Stella Lansdowne-Clyde Bullard marriage Vows Announced Sunday - Rev. and Mrs. E. Ray Lansdowne announce the marriage of their daughter, Stella Irene, to Clyde F. Bullard, Saturday, sister of the bridegroom.

Cleveland-Brewer - Saturday, May 30, 1942 - Anna Cleveland, David S. Brewer Exchange Wedding Vows In Missouri - Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Cleveland, of Alva, announce the marriage of their daughter, Anna, to David S. Brewer, son of Mr. and Mrs. P. S. Brewer, of Cuba, Missouri. Rev. Witt Holly, pastor of the Cuba Methodist church, performed the nuptial ceremony, in the home of the bridegroom's parents, Saturday, May 30.

Stagner-Hood - Sunday, June 7, 1942 - Nuptial Vows Exchanged In Pretty Ceremony Sunday - A pretty wedding of interest to people of this community was solemnized Sunday, June 7 at noon, when vows were exchanged by Miss Ester Stagner, Northwestern State college senior, and Lester O. Hood of Aline. The double ring ceremony was used by the Rev. S. R. Brannon of Peublo, Colo., uncle of the bride, when he read the service before a flower banked altar at Blue Mound church at Gray. The bride was given in marriage by her 80 year old grandfather, Mr. Fred Clark of Baldwin Park, Calif.

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NW OK Marriages 1941

Vol 5, Iss 3 Alva, Oklahoma -

Price-Langley - 1941, Abilene, Texas - Engagement Is Announced - Rev. and Mrs. John Price, Coahoma, Texas, wish to announce the engagement and approaching marriage of their daughter, Patty Jeane, to Fred Langley, son of Dr. and Mrs. M. F. Langley, Alva. The wedding will take place in the First Methodist church of Abilene with Rev. Price reading the ceremony.

Nida-Hall - Sunday, 1941, Alva, Okla. - Miss Betty Jean Nida and Eldon Hall are Married In Impressive Ceremony - In an impressive ceremony solemnized Sunday, afternoon at four o'clock in the home of the bride's parents, Miss Betty Jean Nida, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bert Nida, became the bride of Eldon Hall, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Hall of Alva. The Rev. M. F. Langley of the First Baptist church read the single ring ceremony before an improvised altar banked with gladioli.

Graves-Arganbright - Saturday, 1941 - Vows Are Read For Miss Graves and Mr. Arganbright - Before an altar banked with yellow and white mums and fern, Miss Madeline Graves, daughter of J. R. Graves, Sentinel, Oklahoma, became the bride of Billy M. Arganbright, son of Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Arganbright, Alva, Saturday evening at the First Methodist church, Sentinel.

Miner-Lockhart -- Thursday, January 1, 1941 - Miss Doris Miner Is the Bride of Walter Lockhart Thursday - In an impressive candlelight ceremony, Thursday, January 1, at the home of the bride's parents, Miss Doris Miner, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Miner of Alva, became the bride of Walter Lockhart, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Lockhart, Dacoma, Oklahoma.

Bourne-Richey - February, ca. 1941, Alva, Okla. - Miss Florine Bourne Is the Bride of Billy Lee Richey - A marriage of interest to their friends in Alva is that of Miss Florine Bourne, of Ames, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Bourne to Billy Lee Richey, son of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Richey, Alva. The marriage vows were read February 1, in the Wesleyan Methodist church with Rev. Charles Wilson, officiating.

Barta-May -February 12, 1941, Salt Lake City, Utah - Miss Anna Rose Barta - Edward S. May Are Married In Pretty Ceremony - In a pretty ceremony February 21, Miss Anna Rose Barta, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Barta, Salt Lake city, Utah, became the bride of Edward S. May, Salt Lake city, son of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley W. May, Alva. The wedding was solemnized in the Edgehill Tea Garden at Salt Lake City, with Fred W. Schwendlman officiating.

McConaha-Andrew - February 14, 1941 - McConaha-Andrew vows Are Taken February 14 - A marriage of interest to their many friends is that of Miss Marjorie McConaha, Alva, and Milton Andrew, Alva, son of Mrs. Ella Andrew of Amorita. The marriage took place February 14 in the First Christian church, Cherokee, with Rev. W. A. Keller, pastor, reading the ceremony.

Estle-Carl - Saturday, April 4, 1941, Buffalo, Okla. - Marriage of April 4 Announced Here - Announcement has been made of the marriage of Miss Opal Estle to Virgil Carl which took place Saturday, April 4, in the home of the groom's parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Carl of Buffalo. The bride is the daughter of Mrs. Carrie Estle and Mr. C. E. Estle of Alva.

Richards-Welsch - Easter Sunday, April 5, 1941, Fort Monmouth, New Jersey - Irma Richards, Glenn Welsch Are Married - Mr. and Mrs. O. H. Richards of Arnett, Okla., announce the marriage of their daughter, Irma Richards, to Lt. Glenn A. Welsch of Fort Monmouth, New Jersey, on Easter Sunday, April 5. The ceremony was performed at the Post Chapel at 4:00 p.m. by Chaplain W. H. Teed of Fort Monmouth, New Jersey.

Harth-Rollinn - June 13, 1941, Tucson, AZ - Rosalie Harth, Grant Rollin Married At Tucson, Arizona - Announcement has been made of the marriage of Miss Rosalie Harth, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Harth, 102 Flynn, to Pvt. Grant Rollinn Davis, Mathon Field, Tucson, Arizona, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Rollinn, Caney, Kansas, June 13, at Tucson, in the Methodist church parsonage. The couple is at home at Tucson.

Brunsteter-Heap - Saturday, July 28, 1941, Ashland, Kans. - Marriage of Miss Billie Lou Brunsteter and Paul Heap - announced at Pretty Party Here Saturday - Vows Solemnized At Ashland, Kan., Last July 28 - The announcement of the marriage of Miss Billie Lou Brunsteter, Alva, and Mr. Paul Heap, Tulsa, which was solemnized July 28, 1941, at Ashland, Kansas, came as a pleasant surprise to the guests who were entertained at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Del Brunsteter, 1320 Locust, Saturday afternoon. Mrs. Heap is now attending the University of Oklahoma, where she is a senior in the school of business administration and a member of the Gamma Phi Beta sorority. Mr. Heap is the son of Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Heap, 1220 S. Victor, Tulsa, and is a junior in the school of architectural engineering at the University of Oklahoma.

Hoyer-Weller - Tuesday, July 29, 1941, McAlester, Okla. - Miss Clara Hoyer and Rev. Robert Weller are Married in Pretty Ceremony Tuesday - In a pretty ceremony Tuesday evening, July 29, at eight o'clock, Miss Clara Hoyer, of Alva, became the bride of Rev. Robert Weller, of McAlester, Oklahoma. The bride was given in marriage by her father, Rev. Otto Hoyer, who also performed the single-ring ceremony.

Peters-Savere - August 16, 1941, Pasadena, Calif. - Miss Elsie Fae Peters Became the Bride of Max Savere in Seven O'clock Ceremony - Married August 16 in a seven o'clock ceremony in Pasadena, California, were Miss Elsie Fae Peters, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Peters, Lambert, Okla., and Max Savere, son of Mr. and Mrs. Forest Savere, Mutual, Oklahoma. Rev. Warmer, pastor of the Methodist church performed the ceremony in the home of Mrs. Rene Engel.

Wright-Blue - Thursday, November 27, ca. 1941, Weatherford, Okla. - Miss Doris Wright and Emil Blue Are Married November 27 - In an impressive ceremony, Thursday morning, November 27, Miss Doris Wright, daughter of C. E. Wright, Waynoka, became the bride of Emil Blue, son of Mrs. E. M. Blue, Alva. The wedding vows were read by Rev. A. G. Burgett at Weatherford, Okla.

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NW OK Marriages 1941

Vol 5, Iss 2 Oklahoma - Miller-Baird - ca. 1940s, Alva, Oklahoma - Miss Lois Miller Becomes The Bride of Kenneth Baird Sunday Morning - A marriage of interest was solemnized Sunday morning at 10:00 a.m. in the home of Mr. and Mrs. O. B. Miller, 1031 Eighth Street, when their daughter, Miss Lois Miller, became the bride of Kenneth K. Baird, son of Charles A. Baird, Wichita.

Johnston-Hellman - Thursday, 1941 - Miss Ida Johnston and Earl Hellman Are Married In Impressive Ceremony - In an impressive ceremony, Thursday morning at 8:30, in the Sacred Heart church, Miss Ida Johnston, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. P. A. Johnston, Capron, became the bride of Early Hellman, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Hellman. Father Leo Claus read the double ring ceremony.

Potuznik-Schaefer - Saturday, 1941 - Miss Kathryn Potuznik, and Virgil W. Schaefer Are Married Saturday - A marriage of interest to their many friends is that of Miss Kathryn Potuznik, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Potuznik and Virgil W. Schaefer, son of Mr. and Mrs. Chris Schaefer, Capron. The double ring ceremony was read Saturday morning at nine o'clock in the Lutheran parsonage with Rev. Otto Hoyer officiating.

Melton-Kessinger - Sunday, 1941, Alva, Okla. - Miss Esther Melton Is The Bride of Leo Kessinger - In a simple ceremony at 2:00 p.m. Sunday in the home of the bride's mother, Miss Esther Melton, daughter of Mrs. Harriett Melton, Alva, became the bride of Mr. Leo Kessinger, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Kessinger, Alva.

Kinsall-Rowntree - August 20, 1941, Navy Field Chapel, San Diego, Calif. - Miss Rose Marie Kinsall & Worth W. Rowntree Exchange Vows In Ceremony At San Diego - A marriage of interest to their many friends of Alva is that of Miss Rose Marie Kinsall, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. B. Kinsall, Alva, and Worth W. Rowntree, formerly of Alva. The nuptial vows were exchanged August 20 in the famous navy field chapel on North Island, San Diego, California. Chaplain W. L. Kennedy of the U.S.N. Air Station, San Diego, performed the ceremony.

Harrington-Bagenstos, Jr. -Wednesday, September 24, 1941 - Katherine Harrington and Joe Bagenstos, Jr. Wed September 24 - A marriage of interest to their many friends of Alva is that of Miss Katherine Harrington, daughter of Mrs. Margaret Harrington, and Joe H. Bagenstos, Jr. Father Leo Claus read the low nuptial mass in the Sacred Heart Church Wednesday morning.

Hicks-Rodkey - October 4, 1941, Altus, Okla. - A marriage of interest to the people of this community is that of Miss Phyllis Hicks, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Everett S. Hicks of Alva, and Edward Garth Rodkey, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Rodkey, Alva. The wedding vows were read October 4 in the Baptist Tabernacle church at Altus with Rev. William T. Savage officiating.

Spangler-Sharp - October 6, 1941, Cherokee, Okla. - Spangler-Sharp Wed October 6 - A marriage of interest to their many friends of Alva is that of Miss Maxine Spangler daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Spangler, Walsh, Colorado, and Lt. Paul Sharp, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Sharp of Cherokee. The wedding vows were read October 6 by Rev. W. A. Keller in the Christian church parsonage of Cherokee

Lambert-Vail -Sunday, November 30, 1941, Wichita, Kans. - Miss Alfreda Lambert To Wed At Wichita November 30 - The engagement and approaching marriage of Miss Alfreda Lambert, Barber, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Lambert, Hopeton, and Clem Vail, son of Mrs. Rosa Vail, Wichita is announced today

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NW OK Marrigage 1940-'41

Vol 5, Iss 1

Farrell-Irons - Thursday, 1940 - Miss Lucille Farrell Wed to Perry Irons In Impressive Ceremony Thursday - Uniting two well-known Alva families was the marriage of Miss Claudia Lucille Farrell and Perry Irons at 7 o'clock Thursday evening. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Farrell while Mr. Irons is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Irons.

Sims-Rush - Saturday, June 8, 1940, Enid, Okla. - Marriage of June 8 Is Announced - Miss Modean Sims was married to Donald Rush Saturday evening, June 8, in Enid at the Study of Rev. James Sours, Central Christian church. Mrs. Rush is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Sims of Waurika, Okla. Mr. Rush is the son of Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Rush, Alva, Okla.

Keys-Torn - June 22, 1940, Oklahoma City, OK - Second Member of Quadruplets To Marry June 22 - Hollie, Okla. May 31 (1940) - The Keys quadruplets are about to lose a second member of their famous quartet via the wedding route. Announcement has been made here that Roberta Keys will marry Roland S. Torn of Canton, Tex., June 22 in the First Baptist church in Oklahoma City. Mrs. Fowler; Miss Leota Keys, speech instructor at Baptist Academy, San Marcos, Tex.; and Miss Mary Keys, teacher in the Edmond high school, will be members of Roberta's bridal party. The quads are the daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Flake M. Keys of Oklahoma City, former residents of Hollis. Robert's husband-to-be is the son of Mr. and Mrs. R. F. Torn of Taylor, Tex

Sanders-Shaefer - Thursday, June 26, 1940, Alva, Okla. - Gloria Sanders, Oscar Schaefer Wed Thursday - A wedding of interest to their many friends is that of Miss Gloria Lee Sanders, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. O. L. Sanders, of San Diego, California, and Oscar W. Schaefer, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Schaefer, Alva. The wedding vows were exchanged Thursday morning, June 26 at the Lutheran church of Alva. Rev. Otto Hoyer officiated, with members of the immediate family present.

McConnell-Thomas, Jr. - July 16, 1940, Anniston, Ala. - Florence McConnell, Arthur Thomas, Jr. Exchange Vows - Married, July 16, in Anniston, Ala., were Miss Florence McConnell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ira E. McConnell of Topeka, and Arthur Thomas, Jr. Mrs. Thomas is a granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Bowling of Capron, Okla.

May-Garvin - Thursday, 1941 - Jean May and Loyd Garvin Are Wed In Simple Marriage Ceremony Thursday - In an impressive ceremony at 9 o'clock Thursday morning Miss Jean Kathryn May and Loyd Clinton Garvin were married in the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Stanley W. May, 908 Seventh Street. The bride is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Miller, pioneer residents of Alva, while Mr. Garvin is the son of Mrs. Mamie Duel, Carmen.

McClure-Davey - June 3, 1941 - Engagement Announcement of Miss Linnie Lee McClure and Frank Vincent Davey - Interesting to Alva is announcement of the engagement and approaching marriage of Linnie Lee McClure, former Alva girl, to Frank Vincent Davey of Los Angeles, Calif. Mr. and Mrs. George Lowry McClure, Alva, announce the engagement and approaching marriage of their daughter, Miss Linnie Lee McClure, to Frank Vincent Davey, son of Mrs. Joseph A. Davey of Los Angeles, Calif., formerly of Buffalo, N.Y. The wedding will follow Miss McClure's graduation from Mount St. Mary's college in California in June.

Quigley-Reeves - August 1, 1941 - Former College Student Weds Friday Evening - Married Friday evening, August 1, at the home of Rev. and Mrs. A. Ray Vaughan, were Miss Vuren Quigley, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. O. Quigley, Elkhart, Kans., and Marvin Reeves of Guymon.

Blumberg-Barkley - October 12, 1941 - Miss Blumberg and Mr. Barkley Are Married October 12 - A marriage of interest to their many friends in Alva is that of Miss Marian Blumberg, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Neil Blumberg, and J. D. Barkley, son of Mr. and Mrs. Guy Barkley. The marriage vows were read October 12, in Enid, Oklahoma, by W. J. Gettel.

Bryson-McJunkin - November, 1941 - In an early November wedding, Miss Lena Bryson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George E. Bryson, Alva, became the bride of Lloyd A. McJunkin, Wichita. The wedding vows were read in Newton, Kansas, with Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Hobbs as the only attendants. Mrs. McJunkin is a graduate of Alva High School and attended Northwestern State college where she was president-elect of Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority for the year 1941-42. During the term of 1940-41 she was elected queen of the Ranger yearbook. Mr. McJunkin is the son of O. J. McJunkin, Wichita, and a graduate of Wellington high school.

Lehl-Staake - November 24, ca. 1941 - Miss Freida Lehl, Fred W. Staake Are Married November 24 - In a simple ceremony, November 24, Miss Freida Lehl became the bride of Fred W. Staake, at Medford, Oklahoma. The bride, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Lehl, Alva, wore a blue-green tweed suit with black accessories.

Green-Peebles - December 14, ca. 1941 - Miss Bertha Alice Green Becomes the Bride of Francis Marion Peebles - In an impressive ceremony Sunday afternoon, December 14, Miss Bertha Alice Green, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Green, Alva, became the bride of Mr. Francis Marion Peebles, Mutual, Oklahoma. The single ring ceremony was performed before an improvised altar of ferns and flowers with Rev. M. F. Langley, of the First Baptist church, officiating.

Schooley-Farrell - December 21, ca. 1941 - Approaching Marriage of Couple announced - Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Schooley have announced the engagement and approaching marriage of their daughter, Bernice, to Mr. Kenneth Farrell, son of Mr. and Mrs. Wilson D. Farrell of Alva. The ceremony will take place in the home of Miss Schooley's parents, 1330 Flynn, December 21, at 2:30 p.m. Rev. M. F. Langley, pastor of the First Baptist church, will officiate. Mr. Farrell is now director of music in the Mooreland, Oklahoma, schools.

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Searching For Info on Uncle John

Vol 11, Iss 4 Is there anyone out there in the Freedom area in northwest Oklahoma that remember Earl and Effie (Maxwell) Smith? I am searching for any information, news clipping that happened around 1928, perhaps in the Freedom, Northwest Oklahoma area when a tragedy might have taken their lives.

John G. Smith (1926-2009), Earl and Effie Smith's son, was two years of age when he was taken to an orphanage in Helena, Alfalfa county, Oklahoma, following a tragedy with his parents. Soon after entering the orphanage, Lawrence and Cora Kragh brought young John Smith to their home in Chester, Major county, Oklahoma where he began his school years at Gardenvale School.

At the age of eleven years, John went to live with Fred and Esther Strecker in Chester. John attended Seiling High School until the age of seventeen when he entered the United States Navy and served in the "Asiatic-Pacific Campaign" and the "Philippine Liberation Campaign" during World War II. john was honorably discharged April 20, 1946 at which time he returned to his home in Chester and was united in marriage to Geneva Paris August 2, 1947 at Alva, Oklahoma. John & Geneva made their home at Chester where they raised their three children: Jeanette Kay, Ronald Scott and Barbara Gayle.

Some of you might remember John Smith and his Mobil Service Station that he owned and operated for nineteen years that sat on the Southeast corner at Chester, Oklahoma. John was also a self employed welder and operated a Welding for several years. Do you recall stopping at the highway Jct in Chester and visiting, playing dominoes, cards and shooting the breeze with Uncle John and his family? We would love to share and hear your memories of those days.
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January 19, 1906 - NW O. T. News

Vol 9, Iss 22 These newsy bits were found in the The Alva Pioneer, Alva, O.T. (Oklahoma Territory), Woods County (M County), dated January 19, 1906. See if it jogs any memory cells out there.

The Sheriff of this county, Gus Hadwiger, at the last term of the district court, refused to serve subpoenas in a civil case unless his fees were paid in advance, although he had, the day before, served the defendants' subpoenas without any advance fees. Sec. 4914, Wilson's statures of Oklaha., provides "He (thesheriff) shall execute every summons, order or other process, and return the same as required by law; and if he fail to do so, unless he make it appear to the satisfaction of the court that he was prevented by inevitable accident from so doing, he shall be amerced by the court in a sum not exceeding one thousand dollars, upon motion and ten days notice, and shall be liable to the action of any person aggrieved by such failure."

Luther Martin knows that the population of Woods County, as shown by the assessors returns for 1905, is not 40,000 or over, and will he now proceed against the Probate Judge, L. T. Wilson, to recover for the County the Two Hundred dollars retained by the Probate Judge since July 1st, 1905, and the Two Hundred and Fifty dollars retained by the Probate Clerk since that time? Under the law they are not entitled to this unless the assessors returns show a population of 40,000 or more. And the assessors returns for 1905 show a population of 37,685. And Luther was present when the County Commissioners made their midnight count on Friday, Jan. 15th, and he knows that they made it 38,050. Will Luther get after the Judge? Not much; the Judge is a republican, or at least he ran upon that ticket last fall a year ago.

Oklahoma News - Statehood Bill Has Opposition -- Republicans in the house who oppose the proposed joint statehood bill, have developed such strength that the date of the favorable report of the committee on territories on the measure is uncertain, and many members do not expect to have the bill brought before the house nearly so early as was originally planned. Insurgent republicans allege they have seventy-five republican votes against the proposed rule preventing the amendment of the joint statehood measure. As the democrats would vote solidly against such a rule, it has been reported that the rules committee will not attempt to prevent the amendment of the statehood bill. However, the friends of joint statehood do not admit that seventy-five republicans will join in the attmept to amend the bill, and insist that the committee on rules will have no hesitation in submitting a rule preventing amendments.

Oklahoma News - $10,000 Suit For Woman's Death -- Charles E. Carpenter, administrator of the estate of Mrs. Emma Archer, has brought suit against the street railway company at Guthrie for $10,000 damages for the death of Mrs. Archer, who was killed, with her daughter, Miss Dove Cupp, by an electric car on June 9, 1905. The case is being pushed by Mrs. Vera Calhoun, a Kansas City trained nurse, and the sister of Mrs. Archer, who has the custody of her son, Robbin Cupp. Mrs. Archer had a suit pending for divorce from James Archer at the time of her death, but if damages are recovered from the street car company he will, of course, get his share of the proceeds.

Oklahoma News - Landlord and Tenant In Bloody Battle -- Cicero Roach, a farmer living five miles east of Cloud Chief, engaged in a fight with his tenant and both were injured seriously. Roach was approached by his renter, who, it is said, whipped out his pocket knife and commenced slashing. Roach seized a weapon to defend himself and both fought until too weak to stand. They were fighting when found, late in the evening, lying in blood and besmeared with mud. One of the Roach's arms was so badly chapped up that amputation of that member was necessary. The tenant lost an eye and his forehead was split open. Both were badly beaten.

Oklahoma News - At 76 Old Apache Warrior Weds -- For the eighth time old Chief Geronimo has taken unto himself a wife. The news came as a surprise to everybody, even his nearest relatives. The bride was Mrs. Mary Loto, a widowed Apache of 58 years, who has one grown son. Though the wedding occurred on Christmas day, it was not made public until recently. The first that his home folks knew of his wooing was when he brought his wife home with him, but Indian love and marriage is purely a business propostion. Geronimo felt that he needed a helpmate, though he is 76 years old. His seventh wife died two years ago.
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Pioneer - Joseph Tyler Fash

Vol 8, Iss 34 Joseph "Joe" Tyler Fash was determined to stake his claim and retain control of it. Joe dug his heels deep into the flanks of his horse at the sound of the starting gun on 16 September 1893. Joe made the run into "Old Oklahoma" in 1889 and had staked a claim next to the one selected by his father in the Kingfisher area, but some "sooner" beat him in filing so Joe went back to Barber County, Kansas and waited until the opening of the Cherokee Strip.

Joseph Tyler Fash was born 4 February 1866 at Clarence, Iowa, the fifth child of James Kentner and Rebecca (Miller) Fash. James K. Fash was from Peoria, Illinois. He married Rebecca Jane Miller who was from Ohio. She died 28 October 1922 in Alva. James K. Fash was a farmer and like most farmers of his day kept looking for that spot to settle. When Joe was two years old his parents moved to Missouri and later to Barber County.

After having his claim jumped, Joe Fash went back to Eldred and on 7 May 1890 married Joanna Frances MacGregor. Joanna MacGregor was born 15 February 1871 in Washington County, Kansas, the first of twelve children of John and Lucy Ellen (Riley) MacGregor. Her father, John Jr., was from Edinburg, Scotland and came to the USA with his parents about 1856 settling in Kentucky. At the age of 16 John Jr. enlisted in Co. "D" 19th Indiana Volunteer Infantry as a drummer boy and served until the end of the war. Lucy Ellen Riley was from Kentucky. She was married to John MacGregor at Dowingsville, Grant County, KY. They later moved to Kansas.

After their marriage Anna continued to teach school as she had done since the age of 16, and Joe continued to cowboy until the opening of the Cherokee Strip. Joe got his claim this time, about four miles south of what is now Capron, Oklahoma. Their first house was a sod house of the dugout type, with half above and half below the surface of the ground.

Water was one of the biggest problems of those that did not settle on a creek or where there was a good spring. Water was also the cause of some very frightening hours to the Fash family. Anna and her four-year-old daughter, Helen, were visiting the farm of John Strothers near Sharon, Kansas when Helen pushed the boards away from the well and fell in. Anna slid down the well rope, burning the flesh off her hands, and held Helen up until she could be pulled out with a bed sheet wrapped around her. Anna was too heavy for the lady to pull out so she stayed in the well until the men came in from work in the evening.

Joe was a good carpenter and a good cabinet maker, and supplemented his farm income by building houses. He built his own house which was moved to Alva upon his death and this house still stands. He also helped build the Methodist Church in Capron. Joe operated a hardware store in Capron and Anna taught school at Centerview and worked part time in the postoffice. During the drought of the 1930's, it was Anna's egg money that kept the family in needed supplies. It seemed she could always find some eggs to take to town or some money she had hidden from the sale of eggs. All of the Fash children attended the Capron Methodist Sunday School and church where their mother was a Sunday School teacher for over 50 years.

Joe and Anna lived on the farm until 1949. When infirmities of old age began to catch up with them they moved to Alva. Joe and Anna had that companionable love that made them want to take care of each other. It was this love that kept her going the last few years of her life. She was in the hospital a week just before her final illness, and when her granddaughter took her home, Anna told her that she had spent all day exercising her legs so she could walk into the house and take care of Joe. She died 19 February 1958 at Alva. She is buried in the Capron cemetery. After losing his helpmate who had been with him for over sixty-five years, Joe lost his will to live and died 12 March 1958. Joe was laid to rest in Capron cemetery beside his beloved wife.

Joe and Anna had four children, three of whom were born on the farm south of Capron. Their first child, Alice Rebecca was born at Eldred, Kansas and died there the same year, 17 July 1891.

Charles Kentner "Kent" married Naomi Noble, the daughter of Fred and Nellie Noble. Kent, as he was known, graduated from Northwestern Normal and worked in the First National Bank. The last 14 years of his life he was the County Tax Assessor for Woods County. He died in Alva on 27 July 1964. Kent and Naomi's two daughters: Leona Maxine who married Byron Roberts and Justine Nellora who married (first) Robert Clifton Bright and (second) Ralph Stevens. Both were born in Alva, Oklahoma.

Lucy Helen married Charles Franklin Cameron the son of William J. and Carrie (Nelson) Cameron. Helen taught schools in Oklahoma and Wyoming after graduating from Northwestern Normal. She died at Stillwater, Oklahoma on 23 October 1950 and is buried at Capron. Helen and Charles had two daughters, Dorothy Jean who married Milton Leon Levy, and Joanna Lee who married William Philip Pipkin. They were both born in Capron.

Esther Louise was born 30 January 1910 in Capron. She married John Bruce Walters, the son of Ernest Finley and Gerturde (Bruce) Walters. Louise attended Northwestern Normal. She retired in 1974 from teaching and resides in Texas City, TX. Louise and Bruce have two daughters, Barbara Lou who married (Reverend) Houston Hodges and Janet Jo who married Yves Emile Jacobs, both of whom were born in Capron.

[This pioneer information about Joseph T. Fash was taken from the Pioneer Footprints Across Woods County history book, pages 211-213, written by Col. & Mrs. W. P. Pipkin in the 1970's.]
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Crowell Bros Lumber of Oklahoma Territory

Vol 9, Iss 47 In The First 100 Years of Alva, Oklahoma history book, page 168, there is a picture scene of early day elevators in 1904, showing Crowell Brothers and Harbaugh, Alva Mill Companies. We also did a search on Google's Book search and found a 1916 standard history book entitled, A Standard History of Oklahoma, by Joseph B. Thoburn, that had some history of the Crowell family from North Carolina, Kansas and Oklahoma Territory.

In this 1916 standard history book of Oklahoma by Joseph B. Thoburn, published 1916, on page 1509-1510, second paragraph, second column, it mentions the following concerning, George W. Crowell.

"Among those men of dynamic force and fine constructive powers who have been foremost in the furtherance of the civic and industrial development and progress of Woods County, Oklahoma, a place of exceptional prominence and distinction must be accorded to the sterling citizen and representative man of affairs whose name initiates this paragraph. Mr. Crowell is vice president of the First National Bank of Alva, the county seat of Woods County, was the founder of the firm of Crowell Brothers, engaged in dealing in lumber and grain; and his extraneous capitalistic interests are likewise of broad scope and importance, as shown by his being president of the Panhandle Grain Company of Amarillo, Texas, and president and treasurer of the Centennial Coal company of Denver, Colorado.

"A scion of staunch southern ancestry, George Washington Crowell was born in Stanly County, North Carolina, on 2 February 1861, his advent into the world having thus occurred about the time when the Civil war was precipitated, -- a conflict that was destined to bring his native state into prominence as a stage of military activities and ultimately to bear to it much of desolation and material loss. He is a son of James and Catherine (Russell) Crowell, both likewise natives of North Carolina and members of old and honored families of that commonwealth.

"James Crowell was born in Stanly County, on 29 April 1827, and in the same county were born and reared his parents, who there passed their entire lives. James Crowell was a prosperous agriculturist in his native county at the outbreak of the Civil war and he promptly subordinated all personal interests to tender his aid in defense of the Confederate cause. He enlisted as a private in a North Carolina regiment and with the same gave faithful an valiant service in the commands of Gen. Stonewall Jackson and the distinguished Gen. Robert E. Lee. He took part in many important engagements, including the battles of Bull Run and Gettysburg, and in after years perpetuated the memories of his military career through his affiliation with the United Confederate Veterans, though he left the south within a short period after the close of the war.

"In 1849 was solemnized his marriage to Miss Catherine Russell, who was born September 9, 1829, and whose parents likewise were natives of North Carolina. James Crowell devoted his entire active career to agricultural pursuits and the closing years of his life were passed at Pittsburg, Kansas, where he died on 25f January 1906, and his devoted wife was summoned to eternal rest on 17 March 1904.

James & Catherine Crowell, parents of five sons & six daughters:
"Margaret was born September 9, 1851; James Robert was born July 27, 1853, and died July 22, 1884; Josephine was born February 25, 1854, and her death occurred March 9, 1914; Estella was born February 7, 1858; David Henry Baxter was born December 10, 1856, and is now associated with his brother, George W., in the lumber and grain business under the firm name of Crowell Brothers, his place of residence being Attica, Harper County, Kansas; Franklin, who was born May 18, 1859, is a physician by profession; George W., of this review, was the next in order of birth; and the names and respective dates of birth of the other children are as here noted -- Thomas jefferson, May 20, 1863; Samantha, January 27, 1866; Sarah Catherine, June 14, 1868; and Mary, April 27, 1871.

"The birthplace of George W. Crowell was the old homestead farm or plantation of his father in Stanly County, North Carolina, and he was about eight years of age at the time of the family removal to McLean County, Illinois, in 1868. There his father became a substantial farmer and there he himself was reared to adult age. He continued to attend the public schools of McLean County until he was eighteen years old, in the meanwhile having contributed his quota to the work and management of the home farm. In 1879, at the age noted above, he removed to Crawford County, Kansas, and later he rounded out his educational discipline by completing a course in the Kansas State Normal School at Fort Scott, in which institution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1884. In the same year he entered the employ of the Long-Bell Lumber Company, with the definite purpose of learning the lumber business in all of its details.

"Within the same year he was promoted to the management of one of the yards of this company, and in 1886 he engaged in the lumber business in an independent way, by purchasing the yard and business of the company at Attica, Kansas, where he effected the organization of the present firm of Crowell Brothers, in which his associate is his elder brother, David H. B. Crowell. The firm now maintains a series of well equipped lumber yards, at different points in Kansas and Oklahoma and the business has expanded to large and substantial proportions under the careful, progressive and honorable management of the enterprising proprietors.

"In 1893 George W. Crowell became one of the large concourse of prospective settlers who participated in the run into the famous Cherokee Strip, or Outlet, of Oklahoma, at the time it was thrown open to settlement. He established his residence at Alva, the present thriving little metropolis and judicial center of Woods County, and the governor of Oklahoma Territory appointed him chairman of the first board of county commissioners of the new county. Mr. Crowell thus played an important part in formulating the system of government for the county and also was influential in the progressive movements made by the board for the furtherance of the best interests of the ambitious county and its people. Mr. Crowell has otherwise given effective service in behalf of the public, and especially through his several years incumbency of the office of member of the city council of Alva. He is unswerving in his allegiance to the Democratic party and has been an active worker in its ranks during the years of his residence in Oklahoma, as he has served as chairman of its county committee in Woods county and also as a member of the Democratic committee for the congressional district of which Woods County is a part.

"In 1896 Mr. George W. Crowell represented Oklahoma as a delegate to the Democratic National Convention, in Chicago, and in all things he is to be designated as a loyal, progressive and public spirited citizen as well as a straightforward, alert and substantial business man. In the time honored Masonic fraternity he has received the chivalric degrees and besides being actively affiliated with the various York Rite bodies, including the commandery of Knights Templars, he is identified also with the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine.

George W. & Etta C (Friend) Crowell Family:
"At Girard, Kansas, on the 16th of September, 1885, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. George W. Crowell to Miss Etta C. Friend, who was born on a farm in Macoupin County, Illinois, on 7 April 1862, and who was a daughter of Daniel M. and Charlotte (Lewis) Friend. Mrs. Crowell, a woman of gentle and gracious personality and a lifelong member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, was summoned to the life eternal on 9 June 1911, and she is survived by six children, concerning whom specific mention is made in the following paragraph.

* Frank Dee, who was born at Attica, Kansas, on the 24 December 1886, completed his education in the Northwestern State Normal School at Alva, Oklahoma, and he still retains his residence in Woods County. He has received the thirty-third degree in the Masonic fraternity, besides being affiliated with the Mystic Shrine. On the 4f October 1911, at Alva, he wedded Miss Ethel Noble, who was born at Medicine Lodge, Kansas, November 21, 1887, and they have one child, Robert Dee, Jr., who was born March 30, 1914.

* Ralph Baxter Crowell, the second son, was born at Attica, Kansas, on the 15 July 1888, and his educational advantages included those of both the University of Kansas and Vanderbilt University, at Nashville, Tennessee. August 27, 1912, he married Miss Isis Stone, who was born in Bourbon County, Kentucky, on 15 December 1893.

* Hazel May, who was born at Attica, Kansas, December 14, 1889, remained at the parental home, both having taken courses of study in the Northwestern State Normal School at Alva, Oklahoma.

* James Monroe and George Washington, Jr., are both natives of Alva, where the former was born July 10, 1900, and the latter October 2, 1903.

On the 1 October 1913, Mr. Crowell contracted a second marriage, by his union with Mae Wilcox, who was born at Neosho, Missouri, on 6 April 1884, and who is the popular chatelaine of their pleasant and hospitable home in Alva." -- Google Books Search - A Standard History of Oklahoma
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Tribute To Billy Wayne Whittet...

Vol 7, Iss 52 Dacoma, Woods County, Oklahoma lost a valuable icon with the death of Billy Wayne Whittet, December 23, 2005.

Was it only a year or so ago that Billy's Cowboy Grill closed it's doors in the small, friendly community southeast of Alva, Oklahoma? Remember Billy's famous Chili & bily Burgers?

We searched back through our favorite photos found this great political photo of Billy and friends taken back in 1990 at the Dacoma Cowboy Grill -- showing (left to right) Dorthy "DoRight" McGill, Billy Whittet, Bob Reed (we think) and Estel Haltom. Both Billy and Estel are deceased.

Here is Billy Wayne Whittet's Obituary -- Billy Wayne was born February 12, 1924 at Dacoma, Oklahoma, to John William Whittet and Violet (Newman) Whittet, and died December 23, 2005 at Cherokee Manor in Cherokee, Oklahoma, at the age of 81 years, 10 months and 11 days.

He graduated from Dacoma High School and attended Tonkawa College at Tonkawa, Oklahoma before going to active duty in World War II where he fought battles in New Guinea, The Phillippines and Japan. He was awarded the Bronze Star.

Billy was united in marriage to Floy Lorraine Jenlink on February 27, 1947 at the Methodist Parsonage at Cherokee, Oklahoma and they made their home in Dacoma all their lives together except for five years in which they lived in Wichita, Kansas. They owned and operated Whittets Country Store and Cowboy Grill in Dacoma for 45 years. They made Billy Burgers and Billys Chili famous statewide.

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Old Opera House Mystery Tidbits...

Vol 8, Iss 20 [l & r: Woods County map of Twp. 28N-Rge 14WIM] - Where was Oakes land North of Alva? Who owns the Oakes' land now? We looked through our handy "1906 Woods County Atlas" and found where George Oakes owned 160 acres in the northeast quarter of Section 11, Twp 28N, Rge 14WIM. His neighbors to the north were J. C. Martin, Chas. E. Watkins, and L. H. Walton. To the west was Irena Jarred; South, E. A. Higgins, W. F. Reid; and East was L. Kranz.

Miller, Mabel & Spring 1910 Buggy Ride... [r: 1906 Woods County Map - Twp. 27N-Rge 15WIM] -- In the "Old Opera House Mystery" we spoke of a Spring 1910 buggy ride that Nelson Miller and Mabel Oakes took out west of Alva where Miss Oakes allegedly lost her innocense. While we were thumbing through the 1906 atlas we did a search for the parcel of land that Nelson Miller was supposedly inspecting on a Spring, Sunday in 1910 with Mabel Oakes. Miller described the land as 6 miles west of Alva to the southeast corner of the section line. We estimate that would put it about the southeast corner of Sec. 23-Twp. 27N-Range 15WIM, West of the old McKeever School and near the N. B. Litton land. Other owners showing around there were W. T. Abbott and J. M Benton, and T. R. Shirley.

As to Moman Pruiett... Why Did the famous criminal lawyer, Moman Pruiett, take the side of the prosecution in the "Old Opera House Murder?" We are not quite sure of that yet, but Moman's second wife was Leda Sniggs, daughter of the Hon. August T. Sniggs who was residing in Alva, Oklahoma, Woods County during that time, and the sister of Pruiett's junior law partner Victor Sniggs. We suspect that the "Law Enforcement League (Law and Order League)" made Pruiett an offer he couldn't refuse. The League was one of Pruiett's chief hecklers. It was during the another case and defense of Jim Stevenson, Judge Maben, and Agnes Gilbert, Moman had broken the morale of the League. The League was persuaded that they could NOT beat Moman Pruiett and decided to enlist him for $3,000 in cash to go to Woods County to act as special prosecutor in the N. L. Miller vs. State of Oklahoma murder trial. Leda Sniggs and Moman Pruiett were married on July 7, 1903 in Leda's hometown of Alva, Oklahoma, and their marriage lasted forty-one years until her death in 1944. This information came from a book written about Moman Pruiett (He Made It Safe To Murder) by Howard K. Berry, pages 346-352.

Claud McCrory, county attorney (1910)... resigns & vanishes... The county attorney, Claud McCrory, was under pressure by the Oakes family, citizens and Law Enforcement League to quit stalling the case. When Moman Pruiett moved in as a special prosecutor hired by the League, the gang around the courthouse acknowledge that a lawsuit was going to be tried. Claud McCrory resigned as prosecuting attorney, 9 January 1911 when public sentiment had risen that he had to do one or the other -- resign or prosecute Miller. McCrory quit when it appeared that the case was coming to trial. After McCrory quit, he seemed to vanish into thin air. The League hired runners and detectives to find Mc Crory and supoena him as a witness, but to no avail. Who was hiding this ex-county attorney? AND... Why? Stay-tuned for the "Prairie Connection" July/August edition.

George Oakes' Filings of November 9 & 10, 1910... Last week we had a couple of filings that George Oakes had filed back in November 9 & 10, 1910 during the Old Opera House Murder case. We thought that rather strange that the victims family had to file a complaint & warrant to get the authority to investigate and prosecute, but with some other information we found concerning the gang at the courthouse and county attorney Claud McCrory... we think we are beginning to see the "REAL" picture here. BUT... we are not going to divulge too much here until it comes out in the "Prairie Connection's" July/August edition. Stay Tuned!
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NW Okie's Corner

Vol 15, Iss 7 Alva, OK - Back during the beginning of World War II lots of young men and ladies were getting married just before the men were sent overseas to war. Lots of those marriages did not last, and many ended in divorce after World War II. Just another casualty of war, you ask? Probably! My Uncle Bob McGill was one of those young people getting married.

The Soper-McGill, WWII Wedding took place, June 1, 1944, between Helen Louise Soper and Captain Robert Lee McGill. The wedding Announcement read: "Capt. Robert L. McGill and Helen Louise Soper (Bob's 1st wife) were married 1 June 1944. Helen Louise Soper's parents were Dr. & Mrs. E. M. Soper of Enid, Oklahoma. The marriage was solemnized the first of June in home of the bride-elect's sister, Mrs. W. E. Hackett, Alva.

"Miss Soper attended the Enid schools and was graduated from Enid High School. She was active in dramatics, appearing in several of the school's dramatic productions, and during her senior year was May Queen of Enid High School. She attended the University of Oklahoma where she was an art major. She also attended Hill's Business College, Oklahoma City, and Enid Business College. She was a member of Delta Theta Sorority and while at OU pledged Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. For the fifteen months before the wedding she had been employed at the Enid Army Air Field in the medical department.

"Capt. McGill was graduated from Alva high school, Kemper Military Junior College, Boonville, Mo., and received his degree in business administration from the University of Kentucky. While at Kemper as a member of a small dance orchestra he was given a trip and toured Europe. He is a member of the Scabbard and Blade and Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. Capt. McGill was a reserve officer and was called into the army as a second lieutenant four years ago. He has served sixteen months overseas and is now stationed at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. The couple made their home at Fort Sam Houston."

Uncle Bob got to spend 5 months with Helen Soper-McGill until he was shipped overseas during war during WWII.

Helen Louise Soper and Uncle Bob McGill were divorced 22 June 1948. These are a few of the letters Bob wrote to Helen in 1945:

April 1945, Letter to Helen (Wife), postmarked 24 April '45 but written earlier before 19 April 1945. "You know, honey, I haven't the faintest idea what the date is but I'm sure that it doesn't matter. I'm all relaxed in a very nice cozy place. Honey you should see it. Really "snozy". Radio and everything. Although, I did have to call the electrician over to make a few adjustments on the radio so it would work. I am down south of the Ruhr now up in the mountains and darling it is simply beautiful. Of course we have the most comfortable place in the countryside and really it is pretty swell -- of course yours truly got his thumb in on one of the nicest of the bunch."

15 April 1945, V-Mail, Germany, To: Mrs. Robt. McGill, Alva, Okla. From: Capt. Robert L. McGill, 75 Div HQ APO 451. "I'm having lots and lots of hard work where I expected a rest, but that's the way it usually goes. Well maybe the darn thing will be over within the next four or five years and I can relax for awhile. Really its not as bad as I imply, honey. Nothing that you couldn't cure in just a few days, or actually just a few moments...."

19 April 1945, Letter to Helen, also postmarked 24 April 1945, Germany.

20 April 1945, V-Mail, Germany, To: Mrs. Robt. McGill, Alva, Okla. From: Capt. Robert L. McGill, 75 Div HQ APO 451. He writes, "Well honey, it looks like your husband is going to _____ in a big way for awhile. In fact I'm as far behind the front lines now. I'm almost in communication zone. All the fighting is over here now as you must already know and the Ruhr is all over...."

23 April 1945, V-Mail, Germany, To: Mrs. Robt. McGill, Alva, Okla. From: Capt. Robert L. McGill, 75 Div HQ APO 451. "Lots of excitement around here. I guess the place wasn't as dull as I expected when I first arrived. I suppose by now all you are getting are bunches of my letters telling you to go to work etc. Well, honey, I still mean it, because I'm quite sure you won't be seeing me for a good long time yet. I've reaching the point when I occasionally wonder if I will be able to make the next anniversary that we will have on June 1946."

Five years after World War II had ended, Uncle Bob married a second time after his divorce in June, 1948, to Dr. Felicia Monfort, 21 June 1950, and remained married until Bob's death, 21 February 1954, at the age of almost 38 years, give or take a few months. You can read more about Captain Robert McGill and is WWII Timeline by clicking the link.

Good Night & Good Luck throughout your Life! View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


NW OK Marriage 1943

Vol 5, Iss 12 Oklahoma -

Fisher-Roby, Jr. - Saturday, 23 May, 1943, Alva, Okla. - Fisher, Roby vows Solemnized At Weigand Home Saturday Morning - The marriage of Miss Mary Alice Fisher, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Fisher, 818 Center, and Max Roby, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Max Roby, Sr., Wichita, was solemnized at 11 o'clock Saturday morning at the home of the bride's cousins, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Weigand, 729 Third St.

Albright-Clark - Thursday, 17 June 1943, Alva, Okla. - Gloria Albright Becomes Bride of Lieutenant Clark Thursday Evening - Mr. and Mrs. Charles Albright, 405 Tenth St., announce the marriage of their daughter, Miss Gloria Albright, to Second Lieut. Edward J. Clark, of the 92nd College Training Detachment, Alva, son of Mr. and Mrs. William J. Clark, Brooklyn, NY, Thursday evening in the parsonage of the First Christian church. The double-ring ceremony was solemnized by the Rev. G. R. Vaughan at 8:30 o'clock.

Aitken-Wagner -Saturday, July, 1943, Alva, Okla. - Miss Aitken Becomes Bride of Captain Ernest G. Wagner In Formal Church Ceremony Saturday - Before an altar banked with floor baskets of gladioli and white floor candelabra, Miss Phyllis Jean Aitken, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. King Phillip Aitken, 917 College, became the bride of Capt. Ernest G. Wagner, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest E. Wagner of Fond du Lac, Wis. The single ring ceremony was read at 11 o'clock, Saturday morning in the First Presbyterian church by the Rev. L. T. Knotter, church pastor.

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1st Couple Married In M County, Okla. Terr.

Vol 5, Iss 8 Alva, Oklahoma -

Mr. and Mrs. E. G. McIntire were united in marriage in Alva, by Rev. A. Connet, Dec. 25, 1893. They were the first couple married in Woods County ("M") county. The photo above shows their family in the early 1900s. Mr. E. G. McIntire got a claim one mile north of Yewed. They sold the farm at one point during or before 1904 and they were living in Yewed, Oklahoma Territory in 1904 .

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65 Years Ago

Vol 11, Iss 23 This weekend, June 6, 2009, was the celebration of the 65th Anniversary of D-Day at Normandy Beach, on the coast of France. This is the online link that has more information about D-Day, June 6, 1944.

My Uncle Bob McGill did not storm the beaches of Normandy on that day. Uncle Bob was about to graduate from Officers candidate school and five days earlier had just married Helen Louise Soper, 1 June 1944 after obtaining a marriage license on 31 May 1944 and they were married in Alva, Oklahoma 1 June 1944 with Gene McGill (Bob's brother) as a witness. Bob & Helen's marriage was just another of those pre-war romances before the soldier got sent overseas to war. Uncle Bob and Aunt Helen were Divorced 22 June 1948.

Back to the 65th Anniversary of D-Day ... It was June 6, 1944, when as described at The National D-Day Memorial Foundation, "150,000 Allied soldiers clambered aboard heaving landing craft and braved six-foot swells, waves of machine gun fire, and more than 6 million mines to claim a stretch of sand at a place called Normandy. Their mission was to carve out an Allied foothold on the edge of Nazi-occupied Europe for the army of more than one million that would follow them in the summer of 1944. This army would burst forth from the beachhead, rolling across Europe into the heart of Germany, liberating millions, toppling a genocidal regime, and ending a nightmare along the way. But it all began on this beach in France, with an army of teenagers on a day called D-Day."

The youngest D-Day and WWII veterans turned 82 years of age today ... or this year. D-Day was a turning point in the course of WWII and signaled the beginning of the end of the age of fascism and the return of hope to millions in occupied nations globally.

Did any of your ancestors storm the beaches of Normandy, June 6, 1944?
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Alva (OK) Pioneer - Francis Marion Erikson

Vol 10, Iss 41 On page 207 thru 209, of northwest Oklahoma's history book entitled Pioneer Footprints Across Woods County, had the following information about the ERIKSON family legacy:

John Dedric Erikson came to the USA from Bergen, Norway. he worked his passage over on a cattle boa landing in New York City, when he was a teenager. Jon was a cabinet maker by trade and had his apprenticeship certificate. In pursuit of opportunity he traveled west making his home in Putnam County, Missouri. Included in the accomplishments of his labors as a cabinet maker are several houses still in use there. his houses could hardly be torn down due tot he unique construction of pinning, tongue-groving and being morticed in an unusual manner.

Jon Dedric married Elizabeth A. Erikson and had three children including Plummer Jones Erikson.

Plummer married melinda Harlan and established a home in Sidney, Missouri where he was a farmer and trader. he moved to Iowa later and sponsored a show with a magic lantern, phonograph and French harp, traveling to schools to entertain the students. he spent his latter ears in Florida where he died in 1930. Plummer is buried in Blackwell, Oklahoma.

Francis Marion Erikson, born Dec. 28, 1883 in Putnam county, Missouri, was the eldest son of the Plummer Eriksons. At the age of only 15, Francis Erikson left Missouri to feed 300 head of steers for a Mr. Crumpacker in Nebraska. He undertook the total ranch operations. He cooked for himself in a dugout on the spread and was a part-time boarder with a family nearby.

Francis Marion Erikson married Myrtle Violet Moore, born in Skylar County, Mo, April 4, 1887 of English-Dutch descent. Myrtle's parents, William H. and Mathilda Moore, had come to Oklahoma in a wagon and homesteaded 28 miles northwest of Alva on the present day Eugene Moore place.

F. M. and Myrtle met on the Jim Holmes ranch when she was hired to assist Mrs. Gibson. The couple were married on Jan. 7, 1904 in the Renfrew building in Alva. For a wedding present her father gave them 12 laying hens and the couple often boasted of getting 12 eggs a day. At the time of their marriage R. M. ad acquired a herd of 50 head of cattle and several horses.

When F. M. and Myrtle were first married both worked for George Hodges north of Aetna. Francis then homesteaded a quarter section directly north of what is now the Hill Ranch house, but was then being proved up by Henry Reutlinger. Francis added to his property by buying out another homesteader. The Eriksons made their home in a dugout on the claim where their oldest daughter, Opal violet, was born. He later sold the half section to Henry Reutlinger.

Erikson later bought a homestead in the yellowstone area directly north of Faulkner, 26 miles northwest of Alva, now the Howard Erikson ranch, from his father-in-law.

Francis and Myrtle's children were: William Herbert "Buck", mabel Calre, Irene Ruth "Babe", Pearl Marie, Howard Plummer "BunK", Virgil V. "Buster", Irish, Earl Elwood "Wienie", Francis Marion Jr., Lorna Dee, and Georgia Elaine (who died Oct. 14, 1929).

Frncis & Myrtle's son, Virgil V. "Buster" Erikson, married Rosie Mayes and lived in rural Alva. They ad a son Larry, born October 11, 1938 and died February 8, 1944.

Francis Marion (F.M.) Erikson was fond of horses and at one time had a herd of 40 head. His main goal in life was for his children to get an education. Myrtle V. Erikson died March 13, 1949 and F. M. Erikson, Oct 14, 1963.
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Once Upon A Warwick

Vol 10, Iss 17 Once upon a time very long ago, William Fechtig Warwick was born 11 August 1822 in Augusta County, Virginia to Robert Craig & Esther (Hull) Warwick. [See WARWICK Genealogy.]

Sometime in William Fechtig Warwick's early thirties, he meet and married a young girl from the Pray (Prey) family, Phoebe Anthea Pray. Phoebe was born 3 May 1833 and died 1 May 1905.

To the union of William F. & Phoebe Anthea Warwick eleven children were born: Amelia E., born 16 July 1853; Paul McNeel, born 1856; John Robert, born 9 April 1857, Frost (Dunmore), Pocahontas County, WV; Charles Fechtig, born 31 August 1865; Amanda Gabrielle "Gabie", born 1871, marr. John Landis; James, Louisa Catherine; Nelson Pray; Peter "Pete" Hull, born 1862, in Virginia; Sallie.

From the third offspring born, John Robert Warwick, begins our journey from the Virginia countryside to Oklahoma Territory. BUT... First, the 25-year-old John Robert from Pocahontas County, WV, meets and marries a 22 year old girl from Vanderpool, VA. Signora Belle "Sigga" Gwin and John Robert Warwick were married 16 January 1882 in Harpers Ferry, WV. [See John R. Warwick's Obit]

Around nine (9) months later in Monterey, Virginia, John and Signora Belle's oldest child, Constance Estella Warwick, came into the world, 20 October 1882. About five years later a second offspring, Robert Lee, made his debute 5 November 1887, in Monterey, VA.

Sometime between the second child (1887) and the third child (1895), in 1893, John & Signora Warwick made their trek westward towards Kansas with a ten (10) year old daughter and a five (5) year old son. They settled around the Coldwater, Kansas area where John Robert Warwick was a teacher for a brief time before they settled permanently in the Cherokee Strip Outlet, known as Oklahoma Territory.

Eight years after their second child, a third child (Wilbur "William" Warwick) was born 13 October 1895, in Alva, Oklahoma Territory. John Robert "JR" & Signora "Sigga" Belle's third offspring, Wilbur, died in infancy, 26 May 1896 and is buried in the Alva Cemetery, Block 08-028-08, Woods County, Oklahoma. Wilbur's lonely little grave is located on the South & West side of the cemetery while his parents and siblings are buried on the South & East side of the Alva cemetery.

Of John & Signora's remaining two childern, Constance Estella Warwick, continued the Gwin/Warwick lineage when Constance, age 28, married William Jacob (John) "Bill" McGill, age 30, 23 March 1910, Woods County, Oklahoma.

After four years of marriage, William & Contance's oldest son, Gene M. McGill was born 27 December 1914, Alva, OK. Two years later a second son, Robert Lee McGill, was born 23 August 1916, in Alva, OK.

The marriage of William J. McGill & Constance E. Warwick lasted 30 years when they divorced and went their separate ways in 1940. Constance never remarried, but W. J. "Bill" McGill married his second wife Blanche Rankin Miller in 1945.

Bill McGill died at the age of 79 years, 7 August 1959, Alva, OK. Constance Estella Warwick McGill died 19 August 1968, two months short of her 86 birthday, in Alva, OK.

The youngest son of Bill & Constance McGill, Robert Lee McGill, was married twice, but no offsprings were born of either marriage. After serving in WWII, Robert L. McGill died of lung cancer, 21 February 1954, at the age of 37 years, in Alva, OK, while he was married to his second wife, Dr. Mariam Felicia Monfort (marr. 21 June 1950 'til Bob's death Feb. 21, 1954). Bob and is first wife, Helen Louise Soper (marr. 1 June 1944), were divorced 22 June 1948.

That brings us to the four daughters of Gene M. McGill & Vada Eileen Paris. I was the third daughter of four. My name is Linda Kay McGill Wagner (a.k. a. NW Okie). That is me on the left with Dorthy in the middle and baby Amber on the right.
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Pioneer James Philander Renfrew

Vol 9, Iss 48 As to the "Standard History of Oklahoma" books, I found a set of all the volumes online and acquired them for my library. The set came in the mail Friday. Looking on the inside it looks as if they came from the "East Central State Teachers College Library," in Ada, Oklahoma.

In the next few weeks, we will be looking up some history of past pioneers of Oklahoma & Indian Territory. If you have anyone you want me to research, let me know.

Before we get into Pioneer James Philander Renfrew's legacy, let me share a quote that I found in the Preface, page v of the 1916, A Standard History of Oklahoma, Vol. 1, by Joseph B. Thoburn. It goes like this: "History must be a consensus of enlightened opinion on the part of the many, rather than a matter of personal viewpoint on the part of the few."

James Philander Renfrew
The following past pioneer information came from the 1916 history book, A Standard History of Oklahoma, compiled by Joseph B. Thoburn and associates in 1916.

James Philander Renfrew published one of the newspapers of most influence in the old Cherokee Strip country of Oklahoma Territory: Renfrew's Daily and Weekly Record, in Alva, OK.

Renfrew was a pioneer in Cherokee country, participated in the opening in the fall of 1893. elected treasurer of Woods County; leading figure as a homesteader, teacher, man of affairs and newspaper publisher.

It was written that James Philander Renfrew represented one of the best family stocks that came into Oklahoma when the country was first opened for settlement.

James P. Renfrew was born on a farm in Benton county, Iowa, Aug. 31, 1849, son of John and Hester Jane (Johnson) Renfrew. James' father was born on a farm near Mansfield, Ohio, Jan. 16, 1824, son of James Renfrew, who was a native of Ireland.

James Philander Renfrew was reared and educated in Richland county, Ohio and Caldwell County, Missouri. He was about 11 years old when his father located in the latter county. His advantages in public schools qualified him as a teacher at the age of twenty and he followed that occupation in combination with farming for a number of years. In 1887 James Renfrew removed to Barber county, Kansas and continued farming, teaching for 7 years.

In September 1893, Renfrew was on the starting line for the rush into the Cherokee Strip, staked out a claim of Government land ten miles north of Alva. When Woods county was organized that year all the officers were appointed, and the first regular county election was held in 1894. In that campaign James Renfrew was a candidate on the populist ticket for the office of treasurer and won the contest by a safe majority. This gave James Renfrew the distinction in local county history as the first regularly elected treasurer of the county. After filling that office for two years, he again resumed his work as teacher, and paid some attention to the development of his farm.

In 1899, Renfrew acquired an interest in the Alva Review and for the following three years was its editor. Selling out he then established in 1902 Renfrew's Record as a weekly populist paper.

In 1904 Renfrew became once more aligned with the regular democratic party, but up to that year had been one of the active factors in the populist movement. In 1898 he was the populist nominee for the office of state senator from Woods county.

On Jan. 1, 1915, Renfrew began the publication of a morning edition, known as Renfrew's Morning Record. This newspaper had a large circulation over Woods and surrounding counties and was a paper from which many hundreds of its readers took their opinions on current questions. It also was a prosperous business enterprise.

Renfrew had a modern plant with complete equipment for the publication of his journal and also for general printing. In 1910 he was honored by election to the office of president of the Oklahoma State Press Assoc. and held the office one year.

James & Julia Ellen (Black) Renfrew
Aug. 31, 1871, on his twenty-second birthday, at Mirabile, Missouri, James Renfrew married Julia Ellen Black. The Black family of Missouri had been one of the oldest and most honored for many years. Julia Ellen's parents were Dr. Oakley H. and Susan R. (Hyde) Black. Julia Ellen Black was born April 14, 1856, at Champaign, Illinois, being the first white child born in that city. Her father Dr. Black was born May 21, 1828, in Clark County, Ohio, and was of Virginia parents and English ancestry.

Dr. Black served as a soldier in the Mexican war and was also in service along the frontier against the Indians during the years 1846-51. He was a member of Company B of the First United States Dragoons, and was made sergeant of his company at the battle of Buena Vista. Dr. Black was the family physician to all the best people in and around Mirabile for many years and finally died at Cameron, Missouri, Feb. 13, 1894. He was married Jan. 29, 1854, and the eight children living by his first marriage are Julia E., Emma W., Olive M., Sarah C., Cordelia A., Agnes B., Minerva L. and Rosana M. The mother of these children died Feb. 26, 1870. On Nov. 4, 1870, Dr. Black married Miss Mary T. Rinaman. The three children of this marriage are Charles T., William A., and Mary E. William was a successful editor, newspaper man.

James & Julia Renfrew were the parents of four children: two sons and two daughters. Rufus Oakley, oldest, born July 6, 1872, married Feb. 13, 1898, to Miss Stella Long, daughter of Rev. M.T. and Mary (Noble) Long, who was born Nov. 14, 1878, in Chautauqua county, Kansas, and by their marriage have one child, Edith Lillian, born April 21, 1900.

Rufus Renfrew was in business as a loan broker and abstracter at Woodward, Oklahoma in 1916 and was a 33 degree Mason.

The second child, Mabel Estella, was born October 15, 1873, died September 5, 1874. John Alden, born March 14, 1875, was a merchant, and mayor of Alva in 1916. He married Mabel Williams, daughter of Capt. George L. and Anna F. (Bragg) Williams. They had a child, Clara, born April 22, 1902.

Lillian Emma, the youngest, born October 3, 1876, died May 27, 1900, was married April 28, 1897 to Dyas Galbois, who was accidentally killed July 3, 1909.

Mrs. Renfrew inherited much of the strong mental ability and character of her father, and had ably assisted her husband in the editorial management of the paper. She had also been prominent in club, church and society affairs both in her own city and over the state. She served in 1914 as department president of the Woman's Relief corps, and was past worthy matron of the order of Eastern Star.

John Renfrew
John Renfrew was a farmer by occupation, went to Iowa in 1846, around the time that state was admitted to the Union. about 1860 he set out for Kansas, while that state was being settled, but instead of proceeding to his destination determined to locate in Caldwell County, Missouri, he lived in Northwest Missouri for 28 years.

Afterwards he actually went to Kansas, when conditions were very different from what they had been before the Civil war, settled on a tract of Government land in Barber County. He continued farming until 1894, then in the year following the opening of the Cherokee Strip moved to Woods County, Okahoma, and proved up a homestead ten miles north of Alva. John Renfrew occurred at Alva, June 16, 1902. He married in Coshocton County, Ohio, Nov. 2, 1849, to Miss Hester Jane Johnson, a daughter of Robert and Jane (Stephenson) Johnson. Hester Johnson Renfrew was born April 6, 1831, in Coshocton county and died in Woods county, OK, March 12, 1899.

The Alva editor was the first of their four children (three daughters and one son). Emily Jane, oldest of the daughters, born Feb. 18, 1852, married Dec. 5, 1871 to James W. DeGeer, who was born Nov. 26, 1843, in Ontario, Canada, and lived as a reitred farmer at Nampa, Idaho; James & Emily DeGeer had four children: Cora, Eva, Renfrew I, and Vaughn E.

Mary Ellen, second daughter, born Aug. 10, 1855, married Oct. 28, 1875 to Lyman W. DeGeer and they had 7 children: Muriel, Mabel, Dahl, Frederick, Ernest, Frank and Edgar.

Hessie lou, the youngest born Jan. 14, 1869, married April 22, 1895, to Anthony T. Nuce, and they had two children: Harry Renfrew and Alice.
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Early Days in Oklahoma...

Vol 7, Iss 2 One of our readers sent us some items that appeared in Renfrews Record, dateline - Dec. 12, 1913, Alva, Oklahoma. You can read about these items in the Mailbag Corner, below. BUT.... Have you ever heard about the time Charlie Bower was charged for murder in Cherokee, Oklahoma for the murder of his best friend, Jay French, near Ashley, Oklahoma? We think it might have occurred November, 1912. Other items included in the newspaper: Ed Williamson, Alva RFD #5 Carrier, appointed Dec. 1, 1906; and the marriage announcement of Jacob Molz & Mary Maud Mercer. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


Pioneer Samuel Truitt Carrico - Alva, OK

Vol 10, Iss 3 Here is another Northwest Oklahoma Pioneer, Samuel Truitt Carrico, that we found in A Standard History of Oklahoma, pg.1602, Vol IV, by Joseph Thoburn. Maybe some CARRICO descendants out there would be interested in this information.

Samuel Truitt Carrico was one of the men who participated in the "Run" into Cherokee Strip, September 16, 1893. Captain Carrico gained his rank, title by valiant service as a soldier in the Union army during the Civil war. Captain Carrico for more than 20 years had been closely identified with the business, civic life of the City of Alva, Oklahoma.

Prior to the opening of the Strip, he was a resident of Kansas, and secured one of the choice homesteads at Alva, in Oklahoma Territory, where he opened the first "Real Estate" office. Captain Carrico retired around 1916 from business, and was one of the notable pioneer characters of Northern Oklahoma.

Samuel Truitt Carrico was born November 17, 1840, on a farm in Greene County, Illinois, and was the only male survivor of this branch of the Carrico family, in 1916, which was of Spanish origin. His parents were Silas and Catherine (Decker) Carrico.

Silas Carrico was born at Athens, Ohio, April 18, 1818, his father being a native, Silas Carrico grew up in Illinois and was a substantial farmer there until 1904, when in advanced years he came to Alva, Oklahoma and died in that city May 5, 1905, aged 87 years eighteen days. The business of farming sums up his activities, and he was a man of substantial influence in the community where he lived so many years.

Silas Carrico was a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Methodist church. Silas Carrico married Catherine Decker in 1839.

Catherine Decker was a daughter of James D. and Eliza (Truitt) Decker, the former a native of Germany and the latter of Wales. Catherine died at Carrollton, Illinois, in 1897. She was for many years devoted to her church. There were 7 children in the family, two sons and 5 daughters:

  • Samuel Truitt.;
  • Eliza, died at the age of four years;
  • George Rutledge, died at the age of two;
  • Mary C., died December 24, 1863;
  • Laura, married L. K. Sitler, lived at Enid, Oklahoma, mother of three children: Roger S., Louise Lamar, and George;
  • Lucy C. Vigus, lived at Tulsa, widow of Titus C. Vigus, had four daughters and one son: Carrico, Sadie, Barbara, Port C. and Lucy;
  • Harriet E. Brown, married John L. Brown, their one son and 3 daughters were: Belle, Kathryn, and Inez, who were residents of Chicago, Illinois; and Fred S.

  • Captain Samuel Carrico was one of the men who dates the beginning of their education in a log schoolhouse. That school was back in Greene County, Illinois, and he later supplemented the district schooling with a course in the Bryant & Stratton Commercial College at Chicago, where he was graduated June 14, 1859. A few days later he began his practical duties as bookkeeper and salesman at Carrollton, Illinois and in 1860 became clerk on a Mississippi steamboat -- the Luther M. Kennett -- Captain J. R. Keach, Commander.

    The military record of Captain Carrico begins with his enlistment on November 11, 1861, in Company B. of the 61st Illinois Volunteer Infantry, as a Private. February 5, 1862, he was commissioned Second Lieutenant of the company. October 16, 1862, he became First Lieutenant. May 1, 1863, he was commissioned Captain and resigned May 29, 1865.

    That regiment had all told 63 officers, and of these only 12 were living in 1916. Captain Carrico was the ranking officer of the old regiment, and was the only survivor who reached the rank of Captain at the date of his muster in as an officer, February, 1862. His service as a soldier took him all over the country south of the Ohio River, and he was in many important battles, including the great conflict at Shiloh and subsequent engagements up to and including Nashville, Tennessee, December, 1864. Samuel Carrico was fortunate in escaping wounds or capture.

    With nearly four years of military service to his credit, Samuel Carrico, after the war, engaged in the merchandise business successfully until 1884. In that year he became an early settler at Harper, Kansas, and continued merchandising there. In October, 1885, he was appointed postmaster at Harper, and held the office until he resigned in 1890.

    When Captain Carrico arrived in the Cherokee Strip in September, 1893, he was fortunate in securing a location on land near Alva, Oklahoma Territory on the West. He put up one of the first buildings in the new town, and the distinction of opening the first "real estate" and "loan office." His business grew, prospered. From the first he was one of the men of commanding influence in that locality in northwest Oklahoma. He served as chairman of the Government Townsite Commission of Alva, which issued titles for town lots.

    Captain Carrico was a Democrat in politics. He was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, and was at one time commander of his post in Illinois. He was a charter member of Raboni Chapter No. 25, of the Royal Arch Masons at Alva.

    On March 5, 1866, he married Cornelia C. Bates, daughter of Peter J. and Rebecca (Rummell) Bates. Cornelia C. (Bates) Carrico was born June 30, 1845, at Whitehall, Illinois, and died July 7, 1912, at Alva, Oklahoma. Her father was a native of New York State and her mother of Maryland. Cornelia was an active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

    The marriage of Samuel T. and Cornelia Carrico endured for more than 46 years, and were born 5 children, one son and four daughters:
  • Belle, living in Alva;
  • Minnie, living at Alva;
  • Edward Sherman;
  • Nellie;
  • Reba K., wife of Prof. Guy M. Lisk, superintendent of the city schools at Alva, Oklahoma.

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    Pioneer Lynn G. White - Alva Daily & Weekly Review

    Vol 10, Iss 1 Here is a little tidbit about the republican newspaper, that we call today the Alva Review-Courier that I found on pg. 1525, A Standard History of Oklahoma, by Thoburn. Lynn G. White was editor and publisher of the Alva Daily and Weekly Review, in Alva, Woods County, Oklahoma. Mr. White had shown the technical, executive ability, the progressive policies and the civic loyalty that had not only made him distinctively successful in his chosen field of enterprise but had also given him secure vantage ground as one of the representative newspaper men of Oklahoma.

    Mr. White was born on a farm in Oneida County, New York, on August 11, 1873, the son of Duane D. and Jennie M. (Mattison) White, both natives of the old Empire State, where Jennie was born April 6, 1844, and Duane D. White was born April 13, 1843. Their parents having been born in New York, where the families were founded in an early day.

    Duane D. White devoted his entire active career to the great, fundamental industry of agriculture, and in 1879 he moved with his family to Harper County, Kansas, where he obtained a tract of government land, in what is now Attica Township. He assisted in the organization of the county and both he and his wife endured the full tension of the strenuous pioneer life in the Sunflower State, with the incidental privations and hardships entailed by crop failures due to drouths and the ravages of grasshoppers. Duane eventually reclaimed one of the fine farms of Harper County and became one of the substantial and influential citizens of that section of Kansas.

    In 1911 he released himself from the arduous labors, heavy responsibilities that had long attended him and since that year he had lived in gracious retirement at Alva, Oklahoma. Duane D. White married Miss Lillian Douglas, who likewise was a native of the State of New York, and they had a pleasant home in the City of Alva, where they had resided since 1911.

    Lynn G. White was a lad of about six years at the time of the family moved to Kansas, and there he was reared to adult age under the conditions and influences of the pioneer farm, the while he made good use of the advantages afforded in the public schools of Harper County and those of the high school at Wellington, Sumner County, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1891.

    For 7 years thereafter Lynn G. White continued his effective services as a popular teacher in the public schools of Harper and Barber counties, and he retained his residence in the Sunflower State (Kansas) until 1904, when he established his home at Alva, Woods County, Oklahoma Territory. Here he purchased the plant and business of the weekly republican paper known as the Alva Review, and in 1908 he absorbed the Alva Courier and continued the publication of the combined papers under the title of the Alva Review-Courier.

    In 1911 he gave further evidence of his success, progressiveness by assuming control also of the Alva Daily News, and the year 1914 found him similarly taking over the Morning Times. The publication of the Daily Review had been continued by him since 1914 and his success had indicated not only the working out of the rule of the "survival of the fittest" but had also proved him a man of much initiative and resourcefulness in business -- a strong force in the domain of practical journalism. It is needless to say that both the Daily and Weekly editions of the Review had excellent circulation and received a substantial advertising support. It should not be forgotten that both were made effective exponents of the cause of the republican party, to which Mr. White himself paid unequivocal allegiance, his paper being the official organ of Woods County and of the City of Alva.

    Between the years of 1880-1881, when Lynn White was a mere boy, he came over from Kansas into the Indian Territory and employed himself in the collecting of buffalo bones, which found ready demand for commercial purposes, and that incidentally he traversed in this enterprise the ground on which is now situated the enterprising and vital little city (Alva) in which he called his home.

    At Attica, Kansas, on February 10, 1894, was solemnized the marriage of Lynn G. White to Miss Josephine Warren, who was born in Greene County, Missouri, on May 10, 1875, a daughter of James H. Warren, who likewise was born in Missouri and who became a pioneer settler in Harper County, Kansas. Mr. and Mrs. White had one child, Duane Kidder, who was born at Attica Kansas, on December 25, 1894.
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    November 1907 - Statehood Inauguration Plans

    Vol 9, Iss 45 On November 7, 1907, The Daily Oklahoman reported on this article, with frontpage headlines that read: Elaborate Preparations Are Made For First Inauguration.

    Guthrie, Okla., Nov. 6, 1907 -- The ceremonies for the inauguration of Charles N. Haskell as the first state governor of Oklahoma, on November 16, the day on which the proclamation of statehood is to be signed by President Roosevelt will be made one of the greatest events in the history of the territory, according to the plans of the executive committee of the inaugural committee which met at the Hotel Lone here tonight. Thousands of people will gather on that day to see the new governor take the oath of office which will be administered by Leslie Gordon Niblack, editor of the Guthrie Leader, immediately following the receipt of the proclamation fro WAshington by telegraph. The proclamation will be read by Secretary of State Charles Filson, who will be escorted to the platform by C. G. Jones of Oklahoma city, representative-elect.

    Beginning with a grand parade in which a thousand of the National Guard of Oklahoma and Indian Territory will march, and closing at night with a ball at the city hall auditorium, the day's events will furnish continuous entertainment for the visitors. Governor Haskell will make his address immediately following the reading of the statehood proclamation. The procession will then march to Electric park, where the symbolical wedding ceremony of Oklahoma and Miss Indian Territory will be preformed, the two being united by a minister. Congressman McGuire has been chosen to represent Oklahoma and in a short speech will propose to Miss Indian Territory, who will be represented by a fullblood Indian orator, upon whom the committee has not yet decided.

    Immediately following the symbolical marriage of the two territories, a public reception will be tendered Governor Haskell in the pavillion. A barbecue dinner will be served at the park.

    The governors of the five civilized tribes have been sent personal invitations by the executive committee to attend the ceremonies and to be the guests of the city during the time they are here. A special carriage will be given them in the parade.< br>
    The following committees have been named by the inaugural committee:

    Statehood proclamation -- c. G. Jones of Oklahoma City, representative-elect form Oklahoma County, chairman; Harper S. Cunningham of Guthrie, state senator-elect from the Eleventh district; W. N. Redwine of McAlester, state senator-elect from the twenty-fifth district; J. L. Langston of Oklahoma City, secretary of the Federation of Labor; J. T. Conner of Canadina, I. T.; Dr. John Threadgill of Oklahoma City, department commander of the United Confederate Veterans of Oklahoma; W. N. Harmaday of Lawton, commander-inp-cief of the Grand Army of the Republic; Karl Rohannason of Muskogee, senior warden commander of the Spanish-American war veterans; William H. Murray, ex-president of the constitutional assembly and representative-elect from Johnston county; B. S. McGuire of Pawnee, congressman-elect from the First district; C. D. Carter of Ardmore, congressman-elect from the Fourth district; J. S. Murray of Shawnee, secretary of the Farmers' Union association; Tom Wylie of Muskogee, I. T.; S. O. Daws of Shawnee, ex-president of the Federation of labor.

    Publicity committee -- Omar K. Benedict of Oklahoma City, chairman, president of the New State Press association, and all members of the association.

    Ball committee -- Major H. W. Pentecost, chairman, Leslie Niblack, Dr. J. W. Duke, Galen Crow, and Frank Lucas.

    Executive -- Frank Dale, chairman, Leslie Niblack, J. W. McNeal, Alva J. Niles, and Galen Crow, with Orville T. Smith as secretary.

    Public comfort -- Felix Adler, chairman, Frank Hindman, and J. Frank Laux.

    Parade -- Colonel Roy b. Hoffman of Chandler, chairman, three assistants from each of the territories to be named by him.

    Finance -- L. N. Beadles, chairman, F. H. Greer, I. R. levy, F. O. Luiz, and Harry Gray.

    Transportation -- J. D. Burke, chairman, N. N. Cochrell, Santa Fe agent; C. B. Holmes, Missouri, Kansas and Texas agent; Al Hixon, Fort Smith and Western agent; and J. J. Cobb, Rock Island agent.

    Barbecue -- W. K. Farmer of Muskogee and C. D. Sleeper of Wagoner county, who will be assisted by the muskogee county Democratic club.
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    Pioneer Albert Wesley Lewis - Dacoma, OK

    Vol 9, Iss 50 Here is another Dacoma, Oklahoma pioneer from the earlier days, Albert Wesley Lewis. Anyone out there remember Mr. Albert W. Lewis?

    Albert Wesley Lewis was the manager and treasurer of the Dacoma Lumber Company and the Dacoma Grain Company. Albert was a resident of Dacoma beginning in 1904. Since that time he had participated in all movements that were made for Dacoma's growth and development.

    Albert W. Lewis was born on a farm in Iowa county, Iowa, July 19, 1867, a son of William Wesley and Susan Jane (Rogers) Lewis.

    Albert's Father
    Albert's father was born in he City of Cincinnati, Ohio, of Scotch ancestry, and had spent his entire career in agricultural pursuits. As a young man he removed to Iowa, where he resided until 1877, in that year removing to Kansas and locating on Government land in Pratt County, where he served as postmaster of the Town of Naron for eight years, during 1879 and 1880. In the turbulent period regarding the location of the county seat, he was a member of the board of county commissioners.

    In 1888, with his family, he removed to "No Man's Land," a strip ceded to the United States by Texas in 1850, for many years without any government, and now constituting Beaver county, Oklahoma, where he handled cattle on the open range.

    In 1892 Mr. Lewis participated in the opening of the Sac and Fox Indian Reservation, taking claims with his four sons in what was in 1916, Lincoln County, where he continued to be engaged in farming for nine years. At the end of that time he moved to Alva, where he was living in comfortable retirement, in 1916.

    Mr. Lewis was married in 1850 to Susan Jane Rogers, who was born March 13, 1837, in Pennsylvania, a daughter of Samuel Rogers, a native of the keystone state. Five sons and four daughters were born to this union, as follows: Ida, wife of Henry Burns, of Prague, Oklahoma; Margaret, wife of W. R. Dennison, of Alva, Oklahoma; Dewey, resident of Meeker, Oklahoma; Austin, of Carmen, Oklahoma; George, died in infancy; Columbus W., of Hardtner, Kansas; Albert Wesley, of Dacoma; Carrie, married in 1893 to Jon Godfrey, and died in 1911 at South Greenfield, Missouri; and Laura, died in 1910 at Pawnee, Oklahoma, as the wife of Charles Stevens.

    Albert Lewis was educated in the public schools of Pratt county, Kansas, and grew up in the atmosphere of the farm. When he was 21 years of age he accompanied his parents to "No Man's Land," so that he may be said to be something more than a pioneer of Oklahoma. Later he was one of the first settlers of what is now Lincoln county, Oklahoma, himself proving up land, and for a number of years divided his time between farming and teaching in the public schools.

    In 1900 Albert entered the employ of Crowell brothers, at Alva, with whom he thoroughly initiated himself into the mysteries of the grain and lumber business, and in 1904 was sent by his employers to Dacoma, to open a branch lumber yard, this city having since been his home.

    In 1908 he established the Dacoma Grain Company, which in 1914, handled almost 1, million bushels of wheat. The officers of this large concern being: George W. Crowell, president; George Weaber, secretary, and Albert W. Lewis, manager and treasurer.

    The Dacoma Lumber Company was organized in 1913, with main office at Dacoma and branch yard at Hopeton, Oklahoma. The officers of this enterprise being the same as those of the Dacoma Grain Company. For eight years, Albert Lewis served as Mayor of Dacoma, Oklahoma.

    On October 9, 1888, at Englewood, Kansas, Albert Lewis was married to Mary B. Kees, who was born September 17, 1870, in Ohio, daughter of A. W. Kees, of Gate, Oklahoma. At the time of their marriage, the young couple were living in "No Man's Land, " where there were no courts of record, nor clergy, and Mr. Lewis and his bride went to Englewood, Kansas, to have the ceremony officially and legally solemnized. They were the parents of four children:

  • William R., born August 23, 1890, married December 25, 1910, Josie B. Frye, born in Iowa, July 17, 1890, and they have two children -- Albert William, born August 28, 1912, and Audrie, born January 20, 1915;
  • Nettie, born December 8, 1892, married in 1911 to W. F. Hiatt, and had two children -- Eldora and Walter;
  • Erdice, born February 25, 1894, died May 25, 1910;
  • Alta Maud, born September 9, 1898, lived with her parents in 1916.
  • -- The Standard History of Oklahoma, Vol 4, pg 1351.
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    Pioneer Charles Edwin Moyer

    Vol 9, Iss 49 The death of the late Charles Edwin Moyer occurred January 20, 1911, at his home in Alva, Woods county, Oklahoma. He was a man who had contributed to Alva, Woods County's welfare and upbuilding and who had lent material encouragement to its agricultural interests. Mr. Moyer was pre-eminently a self-made man, and from the outset of is career was compelled to overcome obstacles and survive disappointments in his struggle for success and position.

    Charles Edwin Moyer was born May 5, 1848, in the State of New York, where his parents had been pioneers. He was reared in the atmosphere of the farm and attended the public schools of Illinois, whence his parents removed when he was a lad of six years, although he was largely self-educated.

    During his youth he divided his time equally between working on the farm and railroading, but in 1878 he removed to Kansas and entered upon a venture of his own, taking up his residence and establishing a farm on Government land located in Harper County. There he was forced to endure all the hardships and inconveniences incident to life in a pioneer community, but he persevered in his efforts, and during his seventeen years of residence there was successful in operations as a farmer and raiser of stock.

    Moyer first came to Oklahoma in the original opening of 1889, making the run with the other aspirants for land. He was not successful, however, and returned to Kansas, where he remained until 1893, in that year again seeking a farm in the opening of the Cherokee Strip. Once More he was disappointed, not securing a claim, but the country seemed to hold out attractive opportunities to him, and he elected to remain. For a time he grazed a herd of cattle in old Woods County, and with the proceeds from this business gradually leased school land, and at the same time continued to feed his cattle on the open range.

    In 1894 he removed his family to Alva, having built a comfortable residence there, and from that time he began to realize his ambitions. With careful management, energetic industry and strict integrity, he built up a large and profitable cattle ranch, located 12 miles west of Alva, and in the management and operation of this property passed the remaining years of his life.

    On June 14, 1874, in Iroquois County, Illinois, Charles Edwin Moyer was united in marriage with Miss Ella Burr, who was born June 12, 1856, at Ottawa, Illinois, daughter of Hiram F. and Mary A. (Hower) Burr, the former a native of new york, who was living in 1916 at Pomona, Missouri, and the latter a native of Ohio who died in 1878.

    Four sons and three daughters were born to Mr. and Mrs. Moyer, as follows:

  • Bert Homer, born may 8, 1875, a 32 degree Mason, who died December 11, 1911, at Oklahoma city, married in 1900, Leta Spalding, and had three children -- Marguerite, Kenneth and Charles;
  • Pearl, born october 7, 1877, graduated from the high school at the age of sixteen years, subsequently attended the Northwestern Normal School, of Alva, taught school for two years in Woods county, became an expert stenographer and was deputy register of deeds and an abstractor, and in 1901 was married to Howard Searcy, an abstractor, and reside in 1916 at Wagoner, Oklahoma;
  • Roy Benjamin, born June 19, 1879, who owned and operated his father's cattle ranch 12 miles from Alva, to which he added additional land by purchase, was married in 1907 to Miss Nellie Brown, and had one child -- helen, who was born May 6, 1912;
  • Grace C., born December 8, 1880, married in 1909 Edwin Carlin of Anadarko, Oklahoma, and had two children -- Geraldine, born November 20, 1910, and Moyer, born May 20, 1912;
  • Olive S., born may 16, 1882, married A. c. Miller in 1906, and resided in 1916 at Wagoner, Oklahoma, with two children -- Louise, born June 21, 1907, and A. C., born November 30, 1909;
  • Bruce E., born may 22, 1884, married in 1913, Ollie McAlpin, and lived in 1916 at Mills, New Mexico;
  • Harry, born August 28, 1886, married November 10, 1914, Alma Boone, and in 1916 lived at Altus, Oklahoma.

  • Mrs. Moyer survived her husband and in 1916 was living at her comfortable home at Alva where she was active in the orders of the Eastern Star and the Rebekahs. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. [found in the 1916 A Standard History of Oklahoma, Volume 4, by Thoburn.]
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    Wiley H. Cowan Obituary

    Vol 17, Iss 1 Alva, OK - Written by Thomas "Tom" Jefferson Dyer. Another obituary penned by Tom Dyer. Opal Nighswonger is listed as one of Wiley's daughters and was the principal at Longfellow School in Alva during 1947-1951. Thanks to Joy Sherman for sharing these Tom Dyer writings with the Okie Legacy.

    Wiley H. Cowan

    On Monday morning, November 11, 1935, the news was broadcast throughout our city and county that another of the old-time pioneers had answered the last roll call, and that great reveille had tolled for our old time friend, Wiley Cowan. Perhaps it would be more fitting to say that he was a pioneer of pioneers having spent the major portion of his long life on the early frontier of what was called the Great American Desert. He was born in the state of Illinois in October, 1847. At the age of 15 years he left the parental home to seek adventure in the west. His first venture was from Westport Landing near Kansas City, where he engaged himself as a teamster to drive an ox team in one of those overland freighters caravans over the old Santa Fe Trail to Santa Fe, New Mexico. This was in the year 1863, more than 72 years ago. While on a visit to his eldest daughter, Mrs. Hazel Wiebner (sic), and husband, Fred Wiebner (sic), who at that time were living near Springer, N. M., Wiley located the place where the old trail had been over which he had traveled more than a half century before.

    After his experience as a teamster and freighter, Wiley Cowan chose the life of a cowboy, and in the following year made five trips from Texas, across the wild wastes of the Indian Territory to the wide expanse of Kansas prairies, and the markets of Kansas towns. Two of the trips were with herds of cattle and three were made with herds of horses. At this time he was in the employ of a man named Col. Leroy M. T. Pope, who by the way was the grandfather of one of our genial fellow-townsmen, Roy Day, manager for the Kavannaugh (sic) and Shea hardware company.

    This man Pope was an old trail driver who followed the business for years, and who also owned a ranch in Sedgwick County, Kansas on the Ninnescah and Cowskin near Mount Hope. It has been suggested to me that it was at this ranch where Wiley first met the girl who in later years became his wife and companion. About the year 1874 he came to Old Kiowa in Barber County to engage in the cattle business. These were perilous days in that part of the country, Indians were on the warpath, stockades were being built at old Kiowa and Medicine Lodge to protect the white settlers who had come to Barber County to find homes. He had associated with him the late Clark Bunton, with whom he had worked on ranch and trail, sharing each others trials and hardships, they became life-long friends.

    Wiley Cowan, the cowboy, none better I'll own,
    Astride a cayuse, has ever been known,
    He started out in his youthful years,
    To follow the droves of long-horn steers,
    In the early spring when the grass was green,
    -- ¨From San Antonio up to Abilene,
    Across rivers, mountains, through woodland and vale,
    He traversed the famous old Chisholm Trail,
    And many times, on his trusted steed,
    -- ¨He pointed the herd in a wild stampede.

    On December 22, 1882, he was united in marriage to Manda Day near Anthony, Kansas. It was a happy union of congenial lives. Life took on a more serious side as the problems of life confronted them. Five children came to bless this union, three of whom are still living: John Cowan, of Buffalo, Okla., and Mrs. Hazel Wiebner (sic) and Mrs. Opal Nighswonger of Alva, Oklahoma.

    After their marriage they followed the vocations of ranch life in the year 1883. The Salt Fork and Eagle Chief pool was organized, its personnel was composed of the following members: D. R. Streeter, M. J. Lane, Frank Shelly, Billy Powell, Charles Moore, A. W. Rumsey, Charles Stowell, Major Moderwell, D. Donovan, Wiley Cowan, Clark Bunton, Henry Wick and Frank Stacy. Wiley Cowan was chosen as foreman of the organization. He remained in the cattle business until the Cherokee Strip Livestock Association was disbanded, and the cowmen were driven out of the Cherokee Outlet. At the opening of the Outlet to settlement in 1893, Wiley Cowan secured a fine homestead in the Ashley community where the family resided for something like 12 years. Here he organized the first Sunday school in that neighborhood, and was chosen as its superintendent, assisted by his good wife as co-worker in this laudable undertaking. It is related that not all of the adult population attended the school at first, but the children (God bless them) they were there, and going home gave such glowing accounts of the Sunday school that the parents were induced to go. It became known far and wide as the most earnest organization of its kind. It was a union Sunday school. Wiley Cowan's philosophy of life was to do good, his creed, the Golden Rule. Whatsoever ye would that others should do unto you, do ye even so to them. This was exemplified in his everyday life, as many of his old time neighbors and associates will gladly tell you when they recall the many kindly acts and liberal generosity of their old time friend, Wiley Cowan.

    Selling the old homestead, he bought land and established a ranch near Buffalo and Selman in Harper County, Oklahoma, and which they still own. Bereft of his wife and loving companion on February 24, 1924, he divided his time among his children. In the early part of 1927, he was stricken with paralysis at his ranch near Buffalo, at the home of his son, John Cowan. The malady did not readily respond to any treatment, later he was brought to the home of his daughter, Mrs. Opal Nighswonger, at Alva. Here he spent the remainder of his life a helpless invalid until an all-wise heavenly father released him and said, "-- Tis enough, come up higher." His age, 88 years and 14 days.

    Eighteen years beyond the allotted span
    The Lord accorded to mortal man
    -- ¨He lived, his later years so weak and frail,
    Ere he reached the end of the long, long trail.
    -- Twas in the early dawn, a fitting time,
    To leave this earth to a happier clime,
    When the angels came and wafted away
    His imprisoned spirit from its home of clay,
    The realms of that eternal day.

    With many of his old friends and neighbors, I attended the last rites to pay a tribute to the respect to our departed friend who was beloved by all who knew him best. At the Maughlin and Howerton funeral parlor where it was held, the casket was banked with many beautiful wreaths of flowers, his inanimate form reposing among them as if only asleep. A fitting eulogy was given by Rev. Phil Deschner, pastor of the First Methodist Church, while the music by the ladies quartet was beautiful and appropriate.

    Six of his grandsons were the pall bearers, a splendid tribute by these young men to their grandfather. Their names, Orville Wiebener, Anadarko, Okla., Paul Wiebener, Alva, John Nighswonger, Alva, Hal Cowan, Woodward, Burt Wenel, Hardtner, Kansas, Bob Selman, Woodward. There was one grandson, J. Wiley Cowan whose home is in Glendale, Calif., who could not be present at his grandfather's funeral. His remains were laid to rest by the side of his wife in the beautiful A.O.U.W. cemetery overlooking the city.

    Many old time cowboys, gone on before,
    Await his coming on that golden shore.
    To him they extend a welcome hand,
    A reunited and happy band. ~~ T. J. DYER
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    Ruhama "Ham" (Gwin) Eckard (1857-1921)

    Vol 16, Iss 27 Virginia - [photo image of Great Grand Aunt Ruhama Gwin and Job Eckard] - Ruhama "Hami" (Gwin) Eckard was my Great Grand Aunt, and an older sister of my Great Grandmother, Signora Belle (Gwin) Warwick. They also had an older brother Walter P. Gwin.

    When Ruhama "Hami" GWIN was born on November 15, 1857, in Monterey, Virginia, her father, Samuel, was 32 and her mother, Eleanor, was 27. She married Job E. ECKARD and they had seven (alledged 10+ children) children together between 1880 and 1897. I am also told by the new owner of the "Old Sam Lindsay Place" that they have named one of their hills after Ruhama because any woman who has 10+ children deserves a hill named after her. Ruhama died on June 10, 1921, in Pocahontas, Virginia, at the age of 63, and was buried in Highland, Virginia.

    Hami Eckard married Job in 1877. They had seven children in 21 years. In 1900, she was 40 years old and lived in Monterey, Virginia with her husband, Job, 6 sons, and daughter.

    In 1910, Ruhama Eckard was 54 years old and lived in Monterey, Virginia with her husband, Job, 4 sons, and daughter.

    In 1920, Ruhama Eckard was 62 years old and lived in Monterey, Virginia with her son.

    Samuel Gwin (1825-1871)

    Ruhama's Father was Samuel GWIN was born in 1825 in Highland, Virginia, his father, James, was 50 and his mother, Rachel, was 45. He married Eleanor Ellen DEVER in 1854 in Highland, Virginia. They had three children during their marriage. He died on July 24, 1871, in Highland, Virginia, at the age of 46, and was buried there. Samuel is buried in Gwin & Eckard Cemeteries, on Old Sam Lindsay Farm Location: Mountain Grove, WV.

    Eleanor Ellen Dever -- Ruhama "Hami" Gwin's mother was Eleanor Ellen DEVER was born on January 18, 1830, in Highland, Virginia, her father, John, was 31 and her mother, Elizabeth, was 28. She married Samuel GWIN in 1854 in Highland, Virginia. They had three children during their marriage. She died on October 25, 1896, in Highland, Virginia, at the age of 66.

    In 1900, Eleanor Dever was 69 years old and lived in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania with her son, grandson, and 5 granddaughters.

    Signora Belle Gwin (1860-1934)

    When Signora Belle GWIN was born on August 31, 1860, in Highland, Virginia, her father, Samuel, was 35 and her mother, Eleanor, was 30. She married John Robert WARWICK on January 16, 1882, in Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. They had three children in 13 years. She died on November 16, 1934, in Alva, Oklahoma, at the age of 74, and was buried there.

    Siggie Belle Warwick was married in 1884. In 1900, she was 39 years old and lived in Liberty, Oklahoma. In 1920, Sigga Warwick was 52 years old and lived in Liberty, Oklahoma with her husband, John. In 1930, Signora Belle Warwick was 63 years old and lived in Liberty, Oklahoma with her husband, John, and daughter. View/Write Comments (count 1)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Stella Friends Academy Class Roster

    Vol 13, Iss 6 Alfalfa County, Oklahoma - The photo on the left is a photo of Stella Friends Academy pupils and teachers of 1904. The photo on the right is a copy of the old Stella Friends Academy (1893-1976) photo of what it looked liked in the old days. I wish I had a better photo, but I do not.

    Back in Vol. 3, Iss. 20, 2001-05-19, we talked about Oklahoma Territory school Updates. Especially, Stella Friends Academy. My grandparents had a "SFA 1904" photo that I found in their treasure chest of old memories. The Stella Friends academy was located 1.9 miles east of the US 64 & US 11 JCT., north of Cherokee, Oklahoma, in Alfalfa county, which was a part of M county during the pre-statehood days of Oklahoma Territory.

    The Stella Academy set on the southside of hwy 11, where a mobile home and farm now reside. The historical marker reads, "Buildings near here from 1897 under auspices of Friends Church, the academy was noted for high moral, spiritual and scholastic standards. Closed 1922. Named for teacher of 1st school (1893) in this vicinity, a sod house near Stella Church in Cherokee Strip."

    Mindy comments in Vol. 10, Iss. 9 - 2008-03=02 of The OkieLegacy Ezine, "My cousin's newbook, PHYLLIS MARIE, talks about The settlement near Alva, OK and the Friends school there. I'm still reading about the relative that was a Quaker preacher there. My cousin, the author, has done a lot of research and has lots of info. His name is Terry Row (rhymes with now), and his publishing company is Clifton Edwin Publishing (named after his grandfathers). The phone number is (805) 344-1431. Tell Terry his cousin, Mindy, saw your post."

    Mindy also commented on the OkieLegacy feature, Pioneer Aunt Crosha - Oklahoma. Mindy says, Vol. 10, Iss. 9 - 2008/03/02 -- "Crosha is talked about in my cousin's new book, too (as are Stella and Hunter, OK). He's the author of brand new book, PHYLLIS MARIE (Crosha is in it). He's researched a lot about family history for it. His name is Terry Row, Clifton Edwin Publishing, phone (805) 344-1431."

    Just to review about Aunt Crosha, she was born in REd River county Texas in 1863. Her father served in the confederate army during the Civil War. Crosha and Henry after their marriage lived in Arkansas and probably other places until 1896. They both made the Run for land. henry was on horseback and Aunt crosha was with a team and wagon going for town sites. They settled near Hunter, Oklahoma and had some town lots in Pond creek.

    In late 1896 her brother was shot and killed in Rising Star Texas. He was a newspaper proprietor and editor and may have been shot because of some political disagreement. His wife died approximately 6 months later, 3 months after the birth of her 9th child. View/Write Comments (count 2)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Dorothy Harzman - 1942

    Dorothy Harzman

    Vol 5, Iss 6 From the Photo Mrs. Earl Crowder, South Bend, Indiana, was Miss Dorothy Harzman before her marriage Saturday evening, November 17 (sic), in the Methodist church at South Bend. She is the niece of Miss Luella Harzman, 917 Flynn, Alva, and Mr. Crowder is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Orville Crowder, Cherokee. Horace Mann High School "It is my understanding from my Dad that Horace Mann was a lab school for Northwestern which began as a teachers college or normal school. My dad graduated from there. However, his other older siblings went to Alva High. I don't know how they decided who went where. They had their last high school reunion for everyone who graduated from Horace Mann about 2-years ago. If I learn any more, I'll let you know"' -- Linda View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    NW OK Marriage 1942

    Vol 5, Iss 5 Alva, Oklahoma - Cornish-Behrens - Sunday, 1942, Alva, Okla./a> - Blanche Cornish, John Behrens Vows Read Sunday Afternoon In Alva - Mrs. Pearl Gibson, Alva, announced the marriage of her daughter, Miss Blanche Cornish, to Mr. John Behrens, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Behrens, also of Alva, Sunday afternoon. The vows were exchanged in the home of the bride, which was beautifully decorated with cut flowers. Rev. Ray Vaughan, pastor of the First Christian church, read the vows, at the double ring ceremony.

    Zion-Schroeder - Thursday, 1942, Enid, Okla. - Clara Zion - Cpl. Cecil Schroeder married Thursday At Enid Church - The marriage of Miss Clara Zion, Durant, and Corp. Cecil Schroeder, Alva, was solemnized in the sanctuary of the First Presbyterian church of Enid Thursday morning at 11 o'clock by Rev. Kenneth M. Stewart, minister of Westminister Presbyterian church.

    Kraft-Otte - April 25, 1942, Wichita, Kans. - Dorothy Kraft Weds Ernest Otte In Wichita April 25 - An announcement of interest is made today of the marriage of Miss Dorothy Kraft, daughter of Mr. Conrad Kraft, Burlington, to Mr. Ernest W. Otte, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Otte, of this city. The single ring ceremony was performed by Rev. L. H. Deffner at Wichita, April 25, in the Immanel Lutheran church. The couple was attended by the bride's sister and her husband, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Fullington, Wichita.

    Bodey-Fox - Sunday, May 3, 1942, Alva, Okla. - Miss Sybil Bodey and Charles Fox are Married Sunday at Church Here - Miss Sybil Bodey, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Earl C. Bodey, and Charles Fox, son of Mr. and Mrs. O. S. Fox, exchanged nuptial vows May 3. The service was read by Rev. G. R. Vaughan, pastor of the First Christian church, I the main auditorium of the church, using the double ring ceremony.

    DeClerck-O'Neil - Monday, June 1, 1942, Alva, Okla. - DeClerck, Carmen, Marries Jeremiah O'Neil at Alva Church - Mr. and Mrs. Phil DeClerck of Carmen, announce the marriage of their daughter, Alice, to Jeremiah D. O'Neil, son of Mr. and Mrs. Dan O'Neil of Alva. The ceremony was solemnized at the Sacred Heart church in Alva, June 1, at 9:00 a.m. The Rev. Father Leo Claus officiated. Sister Salome, Alva, played the organ and Joyce Beem, Alva, was vocalist for the ceremony.

    Bonine-Ging - June 21, 1942, Alva, Okla. - Miss Dorothy Bonine Becomes Bride of Herman Ging In Vesper Ceremony at First Methodist Church Sunday - Miss Dorothy Ann Bonine, Bride-elect of Herman C. Ging, has asked her sister, Darlene, to attend her as maid of honor at her marriage on June 21 in the First Methodist church, Alva, Okla. The Misses Bonine are the daughters of Mr. and Mrs. F. E. Bonine, Wakita, Okla., and Mr. Ging is the son of Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Ging, Aline, Okla. Today Miss Dorothy Bonine, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Bonine, Wakita, and Mr. Herman Ging, son of Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Ging, Aline, will be united in marriage at 5:30 o'clock in the First Methodist church. Rev. G. A. Parkhurst will officiate.

    Cox-Morehart - July 4, 1942, Cherokee, Okla. - Ladonna Leigh Cox Marries Murrel Jesse Morehart July 4 at Cherokee - Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Cox, Alva, announce the marriage of their daughter, Miss Ladonna Leigh Cox, to Murrel Jesse Morehart, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Morehart, Alva. The marriage was solemnized on July 4, at Cherokee, in the Christian church parsonage. Rev. W. A. Keller read the service. Attendants for the couple were Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Whitehead, Cherokee. Mrs. Whitehead is a sister of the bride.

    Wright-Metcalf - July 5, 1942, Hays, Kans. - Marriage of Interest Here Is Announced - Mrs. Rosa Wright, of Alva, announce the marriage of her daughter, Miss Florence (Babe) Wright, to Dale Metcalf, son of Mr. and Mrs. Emery Metcalf, Jet. The marriage was solemnized July 5, by Rev. Burns of the Methodist church at Hays, Kansas.

    Dague-Blue - Friday, July 10, 1942, Fairview, Okla. - Mary Lois Dague & Amos Dean Blue - Married Friday Night at Home of Bride's Parents In Fairview - An announcement of interest is made today of the marriage of Miss Mary Lois Dague, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Dague of Fariview, to Pvt.. Amos Dean Blue, son of Mrs. E. M. Blue, of this city. The ceremony took place Friday evening, July 10, at 8:00 at the home of the bride's parents. Rev. A. K. Fleming, pastor of the Methodist church, officiated.

    Martin-Hazard - Thursday, July 16, 1942, Cherokee, Okla. - Martin, Hazard Vows Read Thursday At Cherokee Church - Miss Mary Louise Martin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. I. V. Martin, Alva, became the bride of Mr. R. H. Hazard, son of Mrs. C. A. Gibler, Alva, Thursday, July 16, at Cherokee.

    Ross-Meyers (sic) -Friday, July 17, 1942, San Obispo, Calif. - Ross-Meyers (sic) Marriage Is Announced Here. - Announcement of interest was made Saturday of the marriage of Miss Gerry Ross, daughter of Capt. and Mrs. R. G. Ross, Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Texas, to Corp. John B. Myers, Camp San Luis Obispo, Calif., son of Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Myers of Alva. The couple were untied in marriage at San Obispo, Calif., Friday, July 17.

    Soper-McGill -- 1 June 1944, Alva, Okla. - Engagement of Helen Louise Soper and Capt. Robert McGill Announced - The engagement and approaching marriage of Miss Helen Louise Soper, daughter of Mrs. E. M. Soper and the late Dr. Soper of Enid, and Captain Robert L. McGill, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. McGill, Alva, is announced here. The marriage will be solemnized the first of June in the home of the bride-elect's sister, Mrs. W. E. Hackett, Alva.

    Monfort-McGill - Wednesday, 21 June 1950, Alva, Okla. - Wedding Vows Read for M. Felicia Monfort and Robert L. McGill Wednesday, June 21 - M. Felicia Monfort, MD, and Robert L. McGill exchanged wedding vows at 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 21, in the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Marian Monfort, 817 College. Mr. McGill is the son of Mrs. Constance McGill and W. J. McGill, all of Alva.
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    Looking Back ... To 1891 - Clark Pioneers

    Vol 11, Iss 17 January 3, 1891 Clark Pioneers In Oklahoma Territory -- The following story is a recollection of the Pioneers, the Clark's that came to Kansas, around Kiowa, and made the run into Oklahoma Territory, November 16, 1893. The Clark's mentioned below are ancestors of J. L. "Bud" Clark of Alva, Oklahoma.

    Bud gave us permission to share some of his family stories to show what times were like back in the Territorial days before the Run of 1893 and afterwards as Bud's Uncle tells his story.Bud's father was the Lawrence mentioned as the brother of William "Bill" who is telling the story.

    "Times were very close at this time and father found it difficult to feed and clothe the family on the meager wages he received. The Section work paid $1.00 per day. The children were too small to be of much help financially. I remember my sister Ledona got a job with a man and his wife and daughter at $1.00 per week. Which seemed to be about the prevailing wage at that time. We had a couple of milk cows which helped out giving milk for our mush and apple dumplings. One or the other of these was usually on our menu every day. During the summer months we grew vegetable and disposed of the surplus to our neighbors in town.

    "Lawrence and I took the milk cows out from town and herded them all day. We received about $1.00 per head a month. That made us enough money that we could buy our clothes and a little left over. We usually pastured the cows in the Cherokee Strip before it was opened for settlement on September 16, 1893. The Strip was one mile South of Kiowa. Shortly before the opening of the strip for settlement the soldiers came and ordered us to keep our cows out of the strip. This was followed within a few days by a bunch of Indians.

    "The run is something that will never be forgotten by me. The Run was to be started at 12 Noon on September 16 (1893), by the firing of a gun to start the men and women on their race for a home in the strip. A few minutes before the Run was to start someone fired a gun by mistake or on purpose and the Run was on. The people were along the line for miles in every conceivable conveyance that could be thought of. Horseback (some with race horses), buggies, wagons and carts and some few just walked across the line and staked a claim.

    "My father, John A. Clark and I were on our horses and ready to go at the crack of the gun. We started just west of the Santa Fe railroad on the line one mile South of Kiowa.

    "The Santa Fe train was also on the line with several coach loads of people that were to get off the train as it proceeded slowly along the railway to Alva, Oklahoma, the county seat of Woods county. The race to Alva was for town lots which some of the people wanted instead of a farm.

    "My father John A. Clark staked a claim about 4 or 5 miles southwest of Kiowa. I rode back to Kiowa to have the folks bring the wagon with some bedding and grub so we could stay there for awhile. A few days afterwards father saw another stake not too far from where he had stuck his stake and he was afraid it was on the same claim he had staked. Rather than face a contest he gave it up and he and uncle Albert Williams went down by Alva. He filed on a claim about 4-1/2 miles Northeast of Alva, which was to be our home from then on.

    "In the Fall of 1893, father came down from Kiowa and dug a hole in a bank on the farm and covered it with sod. That was to be the place Lawrence and I were to spend the winter with the cattle father had accumulated. Being some milk cows among the cattle we were to winter, Lawrence and I had milk. Father and mother got us some meal and short and a grear__(???) which started us through the winter.

    "We had to watch out for rattle snakes getting into our dugout as they were very numerous at that time. One bit our dog that winter. Prairie chickens were plentiful and we thought that we could take our old zulu out once in awhile and kill one to provide us with some meat. After killing and cooking one we found out it was no good. In the new country there was no grain to put any fat on the birds.

    "In the fall of 1893, hardly any homesteaders had come down to start work on their claims. It was about two miles to the nearest neighbor Lawrence and I had that first winter.

    "In the Spring of 1894 there were plenty coming in as they had to establish residence within six months after they filed on their claims. Father came down in the Spring of 1894 bringing the horses and farm tools so that he could break sod to get out some spring crops and garden. He built another half dugout and covered it with lumber preparing to bring the family down from Kiowa.

    "One time when he came back from Kiowa the latter part of April 1894 he informed Lawrence and I that we had a little sister who was born on April 7, 1894 and that they had named her Susanna Andrew Clark for her father and mother. Lawrence and I were surprised and wanted to go up to see the baby as soon as we could.

    "Father also informed me that he and uncle Albert had talked to the Missouri Pacific Agent and he wanted a messenger boy which paid $10.00 per month and they had recommended me for the job. I went up and took the job which was the beginning of my railroad career.

    "Mother and the younger children came down to their new home. Ledona and I rented a small house in Kiowa and lived there for a short time while I worked. Tom Wilkinson was seeing Ledona quite often then. Dona was around Kiowa for some little time and worked for different families and was well liked by all of them. Father had been working out in the country for some people and the weather was cold and wet. He contracted a cold which went to his throat and lungs and he passed away on April 15, 1897, the first of the family to pass to their reward.

    "Mother and the smaller children remained on the home place and managed it with the aid of hired help. Lawrence had a job on a ranch. Dona continued to work in Kiowa after fathers death for a few months. On September 28, 1897 she was united in marriage to Thomas J. Wilkinson. They moved to a farm owned by Tom, 5-1/2 miles northeast of Alva. Their first house was a "soddy" as the natives who had taken claims in the Cherokee Strip called them.

    "They were built of sod and covered with sod. In most cases they made a very desirable house to live in until the settlers could do better. I would say that 75 per cent or more of the settlers taking claims in the strip either had dug outs or sod houses. Many of the sod houses were plastered and fixed up inside so you could hardly tell them from a house built of lumber.

    "The newly weds were a very happy couple on their 160 acre farm. Dona having worked so much for other families was a very satisfactory cook. She was rejoiced to get a home of her own that she could manage and raise her children.

    "On August 13, 1898 they were blessed with their first child which they named Thelma Octa May. Dona spent quite a little time with her mother during the early age of Thelma as her mother was sickly. They only lived 1/2 mile apart. On April 2, 1900 another child was born who was named Martha Victoria, for her two grandmothers. I thought that she looked like a little doll. Mother went to a sanitarium at Kansas City, Mo. to be treated for her illness. She was only there a short time until I received a telegram from Ledona asking me to go to Kansas City and bring mother to Sister Marg's at Hutchinson. This was in June 1900. Mother passed away on July 31, 1900. She was returned to Capron, Oklahoma for burial beside her husband John A. Clark.

    "Sister Mary in Nursing mother had contracted the same illness that mother had. On June 14, 1901 she passed to her reward at Hutchinson, Kansas. She was returned to Capron, Oklahoma for burial beside her father and mother.

    "Mary left a son, Alva Matteson, who was about 9 months old at the time of his mothers death. In 1903 Tom and Dona sold their farm to the Wagners and purchased 160 acres of land from Trent Jones 2-1/2 miles South of Capron, Oklahoma. Dona always expressed a desire for her children to have a good education. So as soon as they were old enough she started them to school at Centerview. A school about one mile south from their home. One of the teachers at Centerview was Laura French who taught Thelma in her early school years. Another was Grace McKitrick.

    "Tom and Dona spent about six years of happy life on this farm. Tom was raising wheat and in the fall he would run a threshing macine. Dona was raising fruit and vegetable and disposing of the surplus to her neighbors around Capron and Alva, hitching her old horse, "Bally," to the the buggy to deliver her produce.

    "The children were going to school and raising cain. They were blessed with some extra good neighbors. Joe and Anna Fash, Fred and Edna Fash, Bert Schroth and wife and Tom Johnson and wife and others. The Year 1909, they sold their farm to Thomas Fennesy. Tom and Dona had an auction sale of their personal belongings. Colonel Bill Campbell was the auctioneer.

    After the sale of their personal belongings they began to get ready to make their trip to Oregon where they had thoughts of making their future home."
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    John Glen Smith Obit - 1926-2009

    Vol 11, Iss 4 Last weekend our Uncle John Smith died, January 19, 2009. His obituary can be viewed at this link: Redinger Funeral Home - John Smith Obit. I do have a phone number where you can contact the oldest daughter of John & Geneva (Paris) Smith: Jeanette (Smith) Engle phone number: 405-352-4083.

    IF ... you missed the memorial service January 24, 2009 in Seiling and burial in Orion, Oklahoma, you can sign the online guestbook. It allows you to send private condolences to the family. Type your name, address and message; click the SUBMIT button at the bottom of the obituary. Your message will be sent to the family via their secured guestbook. Only family members will have access to viewing your message.

    Did you know the Paris family of Chester, Oklahoma? Are they related to you? Share your memories of Uncle John and Chester (Cottonwood Corners) with the OkieLegacy eZine!

    Memorial Video of John Glen Smith -- Here is John Glen Smith's Obit below:

    JOHN GLEN SMITH, son of Earl and Effie (Maxwell) Smith, was born May 10, 1926 at Freedom, Oklahoma. He departed this life on Monday, January 19, 2009 at the Oklahoma Veterans Center in Clinton. He was 82 years of age.

    John was two years of age when he was taken to an orphanage in Helena following tragedy with his parents. Soon after entering the orphanage, Lawrence and Cora Kragh brought him to their home in Chester where he began his school years at Gardenvale School.

    At the age of eleven years, John went to live with Fred and Esther Strecker in Chester. He attended Seiling High School until the age of seventeen when he entered the United States Navy and served in the "Asiatic-Pacific Campaign" and the "Philippine Liberation Campaign" during World War II. He was honorably discharged April 20, 1946 at which time he returned to his home in Chester.

    He was united in marriage to Geneva Paris August 2, 1947 at Alva. They made their home at Chester where they raised their three children: Jeanette Kay, Ronald Scott and Barbara Gayle.

    John and Geneva owned and operated John Smith Mobil Service Station nineteen years. John was also a self employed welder and operated Johns Welding for several years.

    He was a life member of the Veterans of Foreign War, a member of the American Legion and a 32nd degree Masonic Lodge member. He enjoyed hunting, bowling and playing cards. He attended the Elm Grove Community Church.

    He is survived by two daughters: Jeanette Engle of Minco and Barbara Walton of Fairview; one son: Ron Smith and wife Karen of Chickasha; seven grandchildren and one great grandchild; one foster sister: Vickie Jones and husband Ron of Yukon, besides many other relatives and friends. He was preceded in death by his biological parents, both sets of foster parents and his foster brother, Karl Kragh.

    The funeral service will be held at 1:30 p.m. Saturday, January 24, 2009 at the Elm Grove Community Church with Pastor Orville White, officiating. Interment will follow in the Orion Cemetery with military honors provided by the United States Navy. Services are under the direction of the Redinger Funeral Home in Seiling.

    Linda McGill Wagner
    PO Box 619, Bayfield, CO 81122
    paristimes@earthlink.net -- or -- mcwagner.lk@gmail.com
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    Pioneer Lee A. Walton - Alva, OK

    Vol 10, Iss 3 Maybe some Northwest Oklahoman's might remember this pioneer, Lee A. Walton, whose history was found in A Standard History of Oklahoma, pg.1604, Vol IV, by Joseph Thoburn. Lee a. Walton resided at Alva, Oklahoma, later moving to Victoria, Victoria County, Texas.

    Lee A. Walton resided at Alva as a citizen of large, varied attainments, even as he was a man of wide experience and broad activities along lines that represent definite civic and material progress. Walton had been one of the influential figures in public affairs and industrial development in Oklahoma, where he established his residence in 1893, the year the Cherokee Strip was thrown open to settlement.

    Lee Walton was a skilled civil engineer, and as such had done a large amount of important work both in Kansas and Oklahoma. It is specially worthy to note that Lee A. Walton was chief engineer of the surveying and construction of the first railroad line to enter the present thriving city of Beaver, Oklahoma.

    As a youth Lee Walton studied law; he had been a successful representative of the pedagogic profession as well as that of civil engineer; he had been active as a newspaper editor and publisher; he had concerned himself with mercantile enterprises; and he had been specially resourceful in connection with the development and advancement of the basic industry of agriculture. All these things betoken his versatility, and his broad mental grasp and mature judgement had further made him specially well equipped for leadership in popular sentiment and action, so that it may readily be understood that he had exerted large and benignant influence in connection with the march of progress in Oklahoma, both under territorial and state government.

    Lee Walton was a native of the old Buckeye state of Ohio, within whose borders both his paternal and maternal ancestors settled in the early pioneer era of its history. Walton was born at Rome, Lawrence County, Ohio, on 14 August 1859. He was a son of Thomas A. and Sarah E. (Massy) Walton, both natives of Ohio. The father having been born in Lawrence County, in 1830, and the mother in Lawrence County, in 1832, a daughter of John and Elizabeth (Darling) Massey.

    Judge Thomas A. Walton was a son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Whitten) Walton, both natives of England, where a representative of the Walton family was the Duke of Leeds. The parents of Judge Walton were numbered among the representative pioneers of Ohio, in which state they continued their residence until their death. In his native state Judge Walton received advanced educational advantages as gauged by the standards of the locality and period, and he not only became an able civil engineer, but also a prominent lawyer and jurist in Lawrence County, Ohio, where he was engaged in the proactive of law as a young man and where he served for some time on the bench of the District Court.

    In 1885 Judge Walton removed to Harper County, Kansas. After devoting two years to farming there he engaged in the same line of enterprise in Barber County, Kansas, where he continued his residence until 1893, when he participated in the opening of the Cherokee Strip, Oklahoma Territory and settled on a tract of land to which he entered claim in Old Woods County. He continued his residence until 1900, when he and his wife established their home at Victoria, the judicial center of the Texas, Victoria County. There they passed the remainder of their lives, Judge Walton passed away in 1906 and his widow in 1913. Their marriage was solemnized in the year 1854 and they became the parents of 5 sons and 4 daughters:

  • John A., born in 1855, died at age of seven years;
  • Charles A, born September 2, 1857, prosperous farmer in Victoria County, Texas;
  • Lee A.;
  • Nora E., born October 3, 1861, wife of Horace Frisbie, residing at Lamar, Colorado;
  • Samantha H. E., born December 25, 1863, died in 1911;
  • Cecilia Ella, born December 24, 1865, died in 1886;
  • Don A., born in 1873 and died in 1892;
  • T. Whit, born 1875, resident of Addicks, Texas.

  • Lee A. Walton passed the period of his childhood and early youth on his father's farm in Lawrence County, Ohio, and made good use of the advantages afforded by the public schools of his native county. When he was 16 years of age he proved himself eligible for pedagogic honors and engaged in teaching in a district school. He continued his successful work as a teacher and also initiated the study of law, in which he eventually gained a broad and accurate fund of technical knowledge. Under the direction of his father he studied and worked as a civil engineer, and served as deputy county surveyor of Lawrence County, under the administration of his father, this position having been retained by him when he was 17 years old.

    In 1883, when he was 24 years of age, Lee Walton came to the West and entered claim to a tract of government land in Harper County, Kansas. He devoted two and one-half years to reclamation and other improvement work on his claim, and in connection with these pioneer farming operations he also found requisition for his services as a teacher in the local schools.

    In 1885 he moved to Stevens County, Kansas, where he engaged in teaching school and where he served four years as county surveyor. For a time he was editor and publisher of weekly paper in the village of Moscow, Kansas, and the former vigorous town of Fargo Springs, Kansas, claimed him for a period as one of its leading merchants. During the last five years of his residence in Kansas, Lee Walton gave his attention principally to farming and teaching in Barber County.

    When, in 1893, the Cherokee Strip of Oklahoma Territory was thrown open to settlement, Mr. Walton was one of those who made the "Run" into this new region, and he had since been closely and prominently identified with this section of the state -- a valued exponent of civic and material development and advancement. Lee Walton was the owner of a valuable, well improved farm in the fertile Driftwood Valley, in Woods County, in which he gave his supervision, as in other various real estate and business interests. He maintains his residence at Alva, the county seat where his modern, attrative family home was a center of gracious hospitality and good cheer.

    In politics Lee Walton had always been actively arrayed as a supporter of the principles, policies for which the republican party stands sponsor, and he was prominently concerned with the organization of tits contingent in Woods County. At the last session of the Oklahoma Territorial legislature, in 1907, he served as doorkeeper of the council or upper house of that body. In 1908 he was the republican candidate for county clerk of Woods County, his defeat for this office being compassed by only seventeen votes. In 1910-1911 he was associated in the editorial management of the Alva Morning Times. In 1883, fully six years prior to the opening of Oklahoma Territory to settlement, Lee Walton assisted in the surveying of the Cherokee Strip in Indian Territory, at the instance of and for the benefit of the cattlemen then operating in this region.

    On April 23, 1883, was solemnized the marriage of Lee Walton to Frederica C. Farson, daughter of Henry C. and Louise (Seikerman) Farson, who were at the time residents of Ashland, Kentucky. Frederica Farson was born in the Province of Westpahlia, Germany, on 25 November 1864 and was a child of six years at the time of the family immigration to the United States, in 1870.

    Lee and Frederica Walton had three children:
  • Lois F., born May 4, 1884, in Harper County, Kansas, graduated at Northwestern Normal School, at Alva, as the youngest member of the class of 1900, and in 1904 she became the wife of Loran A. Purcell. They maintained their home at Sapulpa, Oklahoma, and had four children: Emma C., Lois Esther, Walter Lee and Lloyd Kenneth.
  • Winifred Winona, born at Moscow, Stevens County, Kansas, on 18 April 1889, graduated from Northwestern Normal School as a member of the class of 1906 the youngest member of the class. Later she took post graduate courses in the University of Oregon and the University of California, in the latter of which she was graduated in the department of domestic science. She was engaged in teaching in the public schools of Washington.
  • Loren lee, born in Barber County, Kansas, on 3 September 1891, after completing a course at Northwestern Normal School, in which he was graduated in 1910; he entered the law department of the great University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, in which he was graduated in 1913, at the age of 21 years, youngest members of the a large class. Prior to this he had taken a years course of academic order in Leland Stanford University, at Palo Alto, California. Since 1913, he had been engaged in the practice of his profession at Alva, and he was one of the leading younger members of the bar of Woods County -- a painstaking, ambitious young attorney whose success in his profession was fully justifying his choice of vocation.

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    Pioneer William F. Hatfield - Alva, OK

    Vol 10, Iss 1 Alva's Hatfield Park & Lake benefactor was William Franklin Hatfield, who held the distinction for being former editor, publisher as well as founder, of the first newspaper established in Woods County, Oklahoma. Hatfield developed the Alva Pioneer into one of the excellent daily papers of the state.

    Mr. Hatfield proved himself one of the most progressive citizens of Alva, the judicial center and metropolis of the county -- both through the agency of his paper and by personal influence he had contributed much to the civic and material advancement of the city and county. This and the following information came from A Standard History of Oklahoma, pg. 1513, by Joseph Thoburn.

    Mr. Hatfield was known as a scion of a sterling pioneer family of Missouri. William Franklin Hatfield was born on a farm in Macon County, Missouri, October 20, 1858. He was a son of Mahlon and Sarah E. (Cook) Hatfield, and his father was a native of Macon County, where he was born September 6, 1834, the parents having immigrated from Kentucky to Missouri in 1831 and having been representatives of fine old Southern families. Mahlon Hatfield's parents raised six sons, three daughters:

  • Thomas;
  • John
  • William
  • Mahlon, resident of Alva, Oklahoma, at the time of his death, January 14, 1914;
  • Abraham, prosperous agriculturist in San Diego county, California;
  • Charles;
  • Arena;
  • Elizabeth, widow of Thomas Shane, resided in Macon County Missouri;
  • Jane.

  • Mahlon Hatfield was reared, educated in Missouri and became a successful manufacturer of wagons and farm machinery. This line of industrial enterprise is what Mr. Hatfield gave his attention during virtually his entire active business career. In 1909 he retired and came to Alva, Oklahoma, where he passed the residue of his long, honorable, useful life. In 1853 he was solemnized in marriage to Miss Sarah E. Cook, who was born in Macon county, Missouri, in 1834. Sarah's parents having been natives of Grayson County, Kentucky, and having become pioneer settlers in Macon County, Missouri. Mrs. Sarah Hatfield died June 24, 1872, at Cambridge, Missouri, and was a woman of devout christian faith and of gentle kindliness.

    Of this marriage of Mahlon and Sarah Hatfield were born the following children:
  • James G, born December 3, 1854, living retired in Warrensburg, Missouri;
  • Luella;
  • William Franklin, born October 20, 1858, Macon County, Missouri;
  • Robert E., born March 10, 1865, resident of Warrensburg, Missouri;
  • Clara E. (Mrs. Parr), born January 7, 1865, maintained a home at Camden, Missouri;
  • Lessie, died 1878 at age of 7 years;
  • Other two children died in infancy.

  • In 1872 Mahlon Hatfield contracted a second marriage, when Sarah L. Epperson became his wife. The three children of this union were Jesse M., Charles W., and Nannie L.

    It was on the old homestead farm of his father in Macon County, Missouri, that William Franklin Hatfield passed the period of his boyhood and early youth. In addition to receiving the advantages of the local schools he attended also a well ordered academy at Cambridge, Saline county, Missouri. As a youth William F. Hatfield served an apprenticeship to the trade of machinist, but in 1878 he abandoned this trade to learn that of printer, his apprenticeship in the "Art preservative of all arts" having been served in a newspaper office at Slater, Missouri. Later William was employed in the first newspaper office established at Attica, Kansas, and thereafter he held positions in newspaper and job offices at Harper and Wichita, Kansas.

    In 1890 William Hatfield purchased the plant and business of the Express, a weekly paper published at Hazelton, Kansas, and of the same he continued as editor, publisher until 1893, when he became a participant in the "run" into the famous Cherokee Strip Outlet of Oklahoma, which was thrown open to settlement in that year. He was one of the early settlers in the embryonic little City of Alva, Woods county, Oklahoma, and founded the Alva Pioneer, the first newspaper in the county. Issuing the paper weekly he made it an effective exponent of community interests and progressive movements, its first issue having come from the press on September 22, 1893, and the paper was continued as a weekly until June 24, 1901, when a daily edition was issued in addition to the weekly.

    The Pioneer had ably exploited the priniciples, policies of the democratic party -- both through its columns and his personal activities the editor, publisher had wielded large and benignant influence in political affairs in this section of the state. Mr. Hatfield had served as chairman of the Democratic Central Committee of Woods county since 1900 and during this entire period had been a member also of the Democratic State Central Committee, as one of the leaders in the maneuvering of the party forces in the vigorous young commonwealth of his adoption. He was secretary of the first Commercial Club organized at Alva and retained this position three years.

    After 16 years of continuous, effective identification with the paper of which he was founder, Hatfield retired from active newspaper work on September 1, 1909, when he sold the plant and business of the Pioneer, and in the year 1906 he had purchased 160 acres of land adjoining Alva on the West, a portion of this tract being now an integral part of the city, known as Hatfield Park. With characteristic liberality he donated to the city 57 acres of this tract for park and lake purposes -- Hatfield Park & Lake.

    Mr. Hatfield was also founder of the college library of the Northwestern State Normal School, at Alva and made the first contribution of books for the same. Further than this he was primarily instrumental in securing this excellent institution to Alva, by assisting in obtaining the passage of the legislative act creating the school.

    On May 27, 1883, William F. Hatfield married Miss Fannie L. Whilhite, who was a popular factor in the social and religious activities of the community. The had no children.
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    John David WARWICK & Ina A. Bacon Marriage Certificate...

    Vol 7, Iss 19 A few issues back (Vol. 7, Iss. 15) we talked about the 1938 Graduating Seniors from Northwestern State Teachers College, Alva, Oklahoma. One of those graduating Seniors was Ina A. (BACON) WARWICK. We found a marriage license & certificate that shows the marriage of John David WARWICK of Alva, County of Woods, State of Oklahoma, and Miss Ina A. BACON of Freedom, county of Woods, State of Oklahoma, whose ages, birthplace, residences, are as follows in that order:

      John David WARWICK, 21, white, Virginia, Alva, OK
      Ina A. BACON, 22, white, Oklahoma, Freedom, OK
    It was signed 20th August 1928, Emma Ringer, Court Clerk by Eva D. Lewis, Deputy. The Certificate of Marriage was filed of record on 22nd August 1928 and witnessed by Miss Thora Bacon, Freedom, OK and Miss Ella Bacon of Alva, OK. We have a question for some of you NW Oklahomans out there, especially in the Freedom and Alva area:
      Were Thora & Ella BACON sisters of Ina A. BACON?
      What happened to the birth of their son between 1928-1930?
      What caused the marriage to breakup?
    Our Family Genealogy shows that John David WARWICK & Ina A. BACON wed in 1928 and had a son (probably in 1929). We assume the son died in infancy and the marriage ended shortly afterwards, because the 1930 census from Virginia show David WARWICK, single, living with his parents, and working as a labor on road construction in Virginia. We know Ina BACON was his first wife and David WARWICK later married a second wife, Evelyn Smith, and had two more children in the early 1940's. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    1920, Wife & Son of Prominent Oklahoma Politician

    Vol 17, Iss 42 Alva, OK - The Wichita Daily Eagle, out of Wichita, Kansas, dated 14 March 1920, Sunday, page 30, had the following headlines: "Wife and Son Of Prominent Oklahoma Politician," Mrs. John B. Doolin and young son, John, Jr.

    Found on Newspapers.com

    A charming leader the social world of Alva is this lovely young mother. No club or social affairs were complete without Mrs. Doolin, and her identification with the Woods County Chapter of Red Cross had brought her much praise. Mrs. Doolin had been secretary of the chapter since its organization about three years ago (1917), and was an indefatigable worker during the war. She was the wife of John B. Doolin, the prominent Democratic politician of Northern Oklahoma, who was associated in business with the Schaefer and Doolin Loan Company.

    Before her marriage Mrs. Doolin was Miss Leo Mueller, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Mueller, who were among the early residents of Wichita. Mr. Museller was the first police judge of the city, and as a lawyer was connected with Judge A. E. Helm. As Miss Mueller, Mrs. Doolin was graduated from the Wichita High School and was very popular with the younger crowd. She was one of the bridesmaids at the marriage about ten years ago (1910) of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Dockum (Mabel Magill), which was a lovely occasion at St. John's Episcopal church.
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    Matoaka (Amonute, Pocahontas & Rebecca Rolfe)

    Vol 16, Iss 44 Virginia - Thinking back to my early schooling and the history we were taught it was nothing like the Powhatan Indian history of Poncahontas. We shall try to present the other side of that history here.

    Pocahontas was born Matoaka, also known as Ammonite and later known as Rebecca Rolfe, about 1595, with her death in March 1617. Mattock was a Virginia Indian Known for her association with the colonial settlement at Jamestown, Virginia. She was also the daughter of Powhatan, a paramount Indian chief of a network of tributary tribal nations in the Tsenacommacah, surrounding the Tidewater region of Virginia.

    The name Pocahontas was a childhood nickname that probably referred to her frolicsome nature; according to the colonist William Strachey, it meant "little wanton." The 18th-century historian William Stith claimed that her real name, it seems, was originally Matoax, which the Indians carefully concealed from the English and changed it to Pocahontas, out of a superstitious fear, lest they, by the knowledge of her true name, should be enabled to do her some hurt. According to the anthropologist Helen C. Rountree, Pocahontas revealed her secret name to the English only after she had taken another religious, baptismal name, Rebecca.

    Pocahontas's capture in the First Anglo-Powhatan war, a conflict between the Jamestown settlers and the Native Americans that began late in the summer of 1609. In the first years of war, the English took control of the James River, at its mouth and at the falls. Captain Samuel Argall, in the meantime, pursued contacts with Native American groups in the northern portion of Powhatan's paramount chiefdom. The Patawomecks lived on the Potomac River were not always loyal to Powhatan, and living with them was a young English interpreter named Henry Spelman. In March 1613, Argall learned that Pocahontas was visiting the Patawomeck village of Passapatanzy and living under the protection of the weroance lapses, also known as Japazaws.

    Superman helped translate to Argall, who pressured lapses to assist in Pocahontas's capture by promising an alliance with the English against the Powhatns. They tricked Pocahontas into boarding Argall's ship and held her for ransom, demanding the release of English prisoners held by her father, along with various stolen weapons and tools. Powhatan returned the prisoners, but failed to satisfy the colonists with the number of weapons and tools he returned. There was a long standoff that ensued, during which the English kept Pocahontas captive.

    During the year long wait, she was held at Henries, in modern day Chesterfield County, Virigina. Some suggest or asserted that Pocahontas was raped during this time, citing oral tradition survived and instead argued that any mistreatment of Pocahontas would have gone against the interests of the English in their negotiations with Powhatan. Others wrote that Pocahontas received extraordinary courteous usage.

    According to Helen Rountree, "Other historians have disputed that such oral tradition survived and instead argue that any mistreatment of Pocahontas would have gone against the interests of the English in their negotiations with Powhatan."

    It was during this time period the mister of Henricus, Alexander Whitaker, taught Pocahontas about Christianity and helped her to improve her English. That was also about the time of her (Pocahontas) baptism, that she took the christian name of Rebecca.

    In March of 1614, the standoff built up to a violent confrontation between hundreds of English and Powhatan men on the Pamunkey River. At Powhatan's capital of Matchcot, the English encountered a group of some senior Native American leaders, but not Powhatan (who was away). They say the English permitted Pocahontas to talk to her countrymen. She reportedly rebuked her father for valuing her less than old swords, pieces, or axes, and told the Powhatan she preferred to live with the English.

    A current Mattaponi tradition holds that Pocahontas's first husband was Kocoum, brother of the Patawomeck weroance Japazaws, and that Kocoum was killed by the English after her capture in 1613. Today's Patawomecks believe that Pocahontas and Kocoum had a daughter, Ka-Okee, who was raised by the Patawomecks after her father's death and her mother's abduction.

    Kocoum's actual identity, location and even existence have been widely debated among scholars for centuries with several historians arguing that the only mention of a Kocoum in any English document was taken from a brief statement written about 1616 by William Strachey in England that Pocahontas had been living married to a "private captain called Kocoum" for two years.

    Since 1614 is certainly when she married John Rolfe, and no other records even hint at any previous husband, it has been suggested that when Strachey wrote of the "private captaine called Kocoum" he was mistakenly referring to Rolfe himself, with the reference being later misunderstood as one of Powhatan's officers.

    However there was a Powhatan military rank called Kokoraws, sometimes translated captain, and debate has also raged whether Strachey could have meant this as one of his famously divergent spellings, as a gloss to Captayne. The date of Strachey's original statement has been widely disputed by numerous authors, that Pocahontas had been previously married. If there was such a marriage and Kocoum was not murdered, it likely ended, according to Poshatan custom, when Pocahontas was captured.

    During Pocahontas' stay in Henricus, she met John Rolfe, who had an English born wife, Sarah Hacker, and child, Bermuda Rolfe who had died prior to his journey to Virginia. Rolfe was a pios man who agonized over the potential moral repercussions of marrying a heathen. Rolfe wrote a long letter to the governor requesting permission to wed Pocahontas, and he expressed both his love for her and his belief he would be saving her soul claiming he was: "motivated not by the unbridled desire of carnal affection, but for the good of this plantation, for the honor of our country, for the Glory of God, for my own salvation ... namely Pocahontas, to whom my hearty and best thoughts are, and have been a long time so entangled, and enthralled in so intricate a labyrinth that I was even a-wearied to unwind myself thereout."

    It was April 5, 1614, Pocahontas married the tobacco planter, John Rolfe, at Jamestown. But there is in fact no surviving record indicating where the ceremony took place. Possible sites include Henricus, Bermuda City, and Jamestown. Richard Buck presided. Rolfe and Pocahontas lived two years on Rolfe's plantation, Varina Farms, which was located across the James River from the new community of Henricus. Their son, Thomas Rolfe, was born January 30, 1615. Their marriage was not successful in winning the English captives back, but it did create a climate of peace between the Jamestown colonists and Powhatan's tribes for 8 years.

    With the conversion of Pocahontas and her marriage to an Englishman -- all of which helped bring an end to the First Anglo-Powhatan War -- the company saw an opportunity to promote investment. The Virginia Company of London decided to bring Pocahontas to England as a symbol of the tamed New World savage and the success of the Jamestown settlement.

    In 1616, the Rolfe family traveled to England, arriving at the port of Plymouth on June 12, 1616. Pocahontas was presented to English society as an example of the civilized savage in hopes of stimulating investment in the Jamestown settlement.

    Pocahontas and Rolfe lived in the suburb of Brentford, Middlesex, for some time, as well as at Rolfe's family home at Heacham Hall, Heacham, Norfolk.

    In March 1617, the Rolfles set sail for Virginia. The ship had only sailed as far as Gravesend on the river Thames when Pocahontas became gravely ill. She was taken ashore and died in John Rolfe's arms at the age of twenty-two. It is not known what caused her death, but theories range from smallpox, pneumonia, or tuberculosis, to her having been poisoned. According to Rolfe, she died saying, "All must die, but tis enough that her child liveth." Her funeral took place on March 21, 1617, in the parish of Saint George's, Gravesend.

    Pocahontas has many living descendants. Descendants of many First Families of Virginia trace their roots to Pocahontas and Chief Powhatan, including such notable individuals as Edith Bolling Galt Wilson, wife of Woodrow Wilson; George Wythe Randolph; Admiral Richard Byrd; Virginia Governor Harry F. Byrd; fashion-designer and socialite Pauline de Rothschild; former First Lady Nancy Reagan; actor Glenn Strange; and astronomer and mathematician Percival Lowell. Her "blood" was introduced to the Randolph family of Virginia via the marriage of her great-great-granddaughter, Jane Bolling, to Richard Randolph.
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    Crowell Bros. of Kansas & Oklahoma Territory

    Vol 15, Iss 39 Alva, OK - It was back in 2007, November 24, Vol. 9, Iss. 47 that we spoke of George Washington Crowell and his civic, industrial development and progress of Woods County, in NW Oklahoma.

    As to George's big house on 8th & Flynn Ave., in Alva, Oklahoma, legend has it Crowell wanted to build the biggest house in Alva so he constructed the house in 1906 and succeeded for about a year, until another man (Nickels) built a slightly larger house on the west side of town.

    George W. Crowell brought in an Italian artist, who was charged with scrolling in gold leaf on the walls and ceilings on the first floor and up the stairs. He also carved rail posts and the glass doors leading into the house. All the wood and the tile roofing for the house was shipped in from Kansas. Crowell also had several chandeliers shipped in from Europe. Crowell took copper from a bank in Kansas and installed it in two of the rooms.

    The man of such affairs was George W. Crowell, vice president of the First National Ban of Alva, and founder of the firm of Crowell Brothers. The Crowell Bros. engaged in dealing in lumber and grain. Crowell's extraneous capitalistic interests were of a broad scope and importance, which was shown by his being president of the Panhandle Grain Company of Amarillo, Texas, and president and treasurer of the Centennial Coal company of Denver, Colorado.

    George Washington Crowell was born in Stanly County, North Carolina, 2 February 1861, when the Civil war was precipitated. It was a conflict that was destined to bring his native state into prominence as a stage of military activities and ultimately to bear to it much of desolation and material loss. George was the son of James and Catherine (Russell) Crowell, both natives of North Carolina and members of an old and honored families of that commonwealth.

    George's father, James, was born in Stanly county, 29 April 1827, a prosperous agriculturist at the outbreak of the Civil War. James promptly subordinated all personal interests to tender his aid in defense of the Confederate cause. He enlisted as a private in a North Carolina regiment and with the same gave faithful an valiant service in the commands of Gen. Stonewall Jackson and Gen. Robert E. Lee. James also took part in many important engagements, including the battles of Bull Run and Gettysburg, though he left the south within a short period after the close of the war.

    James Crowell, in 1849, married Miss Catherine Russell, who was born 9 SEptember 1829, and whose parents were also natives of North Carolina. James Crowell devoted his entire active career to agricultural pursuits, and at the closing years of his life were passed at Pittsburg, Kansas, where he died on 25 January 1906. His devoted wife, Catherine, died 17 March 1904.

    James and Catherine Crowell had five sons and six daughters: Margaret, born 9 September 1851; James Robert, born 27 July 1853, died 22 July 1884; Josephine, born 25 February 1854, died 9 March 9, 1914; Estella, born 7 February 1858; David Henry Baxter, born 10 December 1856; Franklin, born 18 May 1859, was a physician ; George Washington Crowell born 1861; ThomasJefferson, born 20 May 1863; Samantha, born 27 January 1866; Sarah Catherine, born 14 June 1868; and Mary, born 27 April 1871.

    David Henry Baxter and George WAshington Crowell were associated with each other in the lumber and grain business under the firm name of "Crowell Brothers" with residences being Attica, Harper county, Kansas.

    In 1886 the Crowell Bros. engaged in the lumber business in an independent way, by purchasing the yard and business of the company at Attica, Kansas, where he effected the organization of the Crowell Brothers, in which his associate was his elder brother, David H. B. Crowell. The firm maintained a series of well equipped lumber yards, at different points in Kansas and Oklahoma. The business had expanded to large and substantial proportions under the careful, progressive and honorable management of the enterprising proprietors of the Crowell Brothers.

    In 1893 George W. Crowell became one of the large concourse of prospective settlers who participated in the run into the famous Cherokee Strip (Outlet) of Oklahoma, at the time it was thrown open to settlement. He established his residence at Alva, the present thriving little metropolis and judicial center of Woods County, and the governor of Oklahoma Territory appointed him chairman of the first board of county commissioners of the new county.

    Mr. Crowell played an important part in formulating the system of government for the county and also was influential in the progressive movements made by the board for the furtherance of the best interests of the ambitious county and its people. Mr. Crowell gave effective service in behalf of the public, and especially through his several years incumbency of the office of member of the city council of Alva. He was unswerving in his allegiance to the Democratic party and was an active worker in its ranks during the years of his residence in Oklahoma, as he has served as chairman of its county committee in Woods county and also as a member of the Democratic committee for the congressional district of which Woods County is a part.

    In 1896 Mr. George W. Crowell represented Oklahoma as a delegate to the Democratic National Convention, in Chicago, and in all things he was to be designated as a loyal, progressive and public spirited citizen as well as a straightforward, alert and substantial business man. In the time honored Masonic fraternity he received the chivalric degrees and besides being actively affiliated with the various York Rite bodies, including the commandery of Knights Templars, he was identified also with the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine.

    George W. and Etta C. Friend) were married at Girard, Kansas, 16 September 1885. Miss Etta C. Friend was born on a farm in Macoupin County, Illinois, on 7 April 1862, and was a daughter of Daniel M. and Charlotte (Lewis) Friend. Mrs. Crowell, a woman of gentle and gracious personality and a lifelong member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, died 9 June 1911, and she was survived by six children:

    • Frank Dee, who was born at Attica, Kansas, on the 24 December 1886, completed his education in the Northwestern State Normal School at Alva, Oklahoma, and he still retains his residence in Woods County. He has received the thirty-third degree in the Masonic fraternity, besides being affiliated with the Mystic Shrine. On the 4f October 1911, at Alva, he wedded Miss Ethel Noble, who was born at Medicine Lodge, Kansas, November 21, 1887, and they have one child, Robert Dee, Jr., who was born March 30, 1914.
    • Ralph Baxter Crowell, the second son, was born at Attica, Kansas, on the 15 July 1888, and his educational advantages included those of both the University of Kansas and Vanderbilt University, at Nashville, Tennessee. August 27, 1912, he married Miss Isis Stone, who was born in Bourbon County, Kentucky, on 15 December 1893.
    • Hazel May, who was born at Attica, Kansas, December 14, 1889, remained at the parental home, both having taken courses of study in the Northwestern State Normal School at Alva, Oklahoma.
    • James Monroe and George Washington, Jr., are both natives of Alva, where the former was born July 10, 1900, and the latter October 2, 1903.
    On the 1 October 1913, Mr. Crowell contracted a second marriage, by his union with Mae Wilcox, who was born at Neosho, Missouri, on 6 April 1884, and who is the popular chatelaine of their pleasant and hospitable home in Alva. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Old NW Oklahoma Wedding Announcements

    Vol 15, Iss 9 Alva, OK - Alva Girl Is Married Saturday -- Mrs. Ivy Alexander, daughter of Mr. & Mrs. R. I. DeGeer, and Howard Dunning united in marriage at 6 o'clock Saturday morning, at home of bride's parents, 613 1/2 Barnes (Alva).

    Boyce Shaefer Wedding

    Ruth Ida Boyce, daughter of Mrs. Faye O. Boyce, 705 5th Street, became the bride of Andrew A. Shaefer, son of Mr. & Mrs. Chris Schaefer, Alva - July 14, 1940

    Morefield-Nicola Vows Taken Here Friday (1942) Enid girl weds Alva man in quiet ceremony. Miss Lorene Morefield, daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Glen C. Morefield, 2104 West Randolph, to Stanley Nicola, son of Mrs. Lorena Nicola, Alva.

    Shafer-Haney Wedding

    Ferguson, Missouri marked the marriage of Joyce Shafer of Ferguson, Mo., daughter of Mrs. Anton Safer of Alva, to Byron E. Haney, also of Ferguson, Missouri, at 3:00P.M., May 31.

    October, 1937 Wedding

    Popular city couple is announced - Miss Cleo Patricia Bailey becomes bride of William E. Gruber in service at Chandler, Oklahoma.

    Shafer-Reneau Wedding - 1937

    Miss Joan Shafer Weds Raymond Reneau at Anthony, Wednesday - Marriage of especial interest to the people of Alva was that of Miss Joan Shafer, daughter of Mr & Mrs. Anton Shafer, to Mr. Raymond Reneau, of Los Angeles, Calif., which

    Yohn-Cameron - Monday, Sept. 28, 1936

    Vows Are Read For Popular Young Couple - The marriage of Miss Louise Yohn, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Yohn, northwest of the city, and Robert Cameron, only son of Mr. and Mrs. John Welch Cameron, west of Alva, was solemnized Monday, September 28, at the home of the Rev. R. G. Vaughan, pastor of the Christian Church.

    More Northwest Oklahoma marriages from these years during and before World War II can be viewed at our NW OkieLegacy site. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Obituary - John David Heaton (1924-2012)

    Vol 14, Iss 19 Capron, Oklahoma - NW Okie's second cousin died last week, 2 May 2012, at Alva, Oklahoma, at the age of 88 years, 1 month and 2 days. Graveside services for Joseph David Heaton were held at 2:00 p.m., Saturday, May 5, 2012, at the Capron Cemetery with Rev. Terry Martindale officiating.

    Joe David Heaton was the son of the late Joseph William Heaton (1898-1965) and Gladys McGill (1900-1988). Joe D. Heaton was born 30 March 1924, at Capron, Oklahoma and passed away 2 May 1012, at Alva, Oklahoma.

    Joe's Obituary stated that Joe graduated from Capron High School, received his Bachelors Degree from Northwestern State College, and obtained his Master of Industrial Arts Degree from Colorado State University. Joe was united in marriage to Doris Eileen Bickel at Medicine Lodge, Kansas. He served as a Sergeant in the US Army Air Corps from 1944 to 1945. Joe taught in the Alva Schools for over 30 years as an Industrial Arts Teacher. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Mantz in Ingersol, Okla

    Vol 6, Iss 37 Ingersoll, Oklahoma - "I remember the Mantz's very well, but I never heard Mr. Mantz called 'Leonard.' Their names were Raymond and Nettie Mantz and they opened that filling station around 1949 or 1950. Raymond was a fishing buddy of my dad's and we went on many outings (fishing, picnicking, sand plum and wild grape picking, etc.) with them when they lived in Alva in the late forties.

    Raymond had a brother who sharpened one-way plows, but I can't remember his first name. Raymond was usually self-employed during that time, and took part in the annual broomcorn harvest in the southwest Kansas - southeast Colorado area. My older brother John went out there and worked for him for two years at harvest time. Raymond also had a commercial fishing license and dealt in live minnows, and my brother was his right-hand man in that operation, also.

    As it was the twilight of the broomcorn era and Raymond was getting on in years, he invested in the small station at Ingersoll. At the time, Nettie's mother (whom I knew only as Mrs. McGee) was still living with them. Mrs. McGee was very thin and frail and was not very talkative. The station (Mantz' 66 Station) had three rooms: a small front room where they sold beer, candy, cigarettes, ice cream bars and a few non-perishable grocery items; a room immediately behind that contained a table and chairs, small stove, refrigerator and a day bed for Mrs. McGee; and there was a tiny bedroom in the west end where Raymond and Nettie slept.

    Later they lived in a building across the street, but I was never in it. Along with the three people, they also had an indoor dog named 'Grumpy.' Grumpy was an old, short-haired, short-legged mongrel with a large wart on his head and pretty well lived up to his name.

    Nettie and Raymond had no children of their own, but I think Raymond had at least one child by a previous marriage. I don't know much at all about his earlier life nor Nettie's. There were still quite a number of families living in Ingersoll at the time, and I remember going with Raymond once as he ran a milk route. I don't know what else he did, but he was a varied small entreprenuer in the years I knew him. The last time I talked to them was in 1978, and I think Raymond died not too long after that. Nettie lived for quite some time after that and I would see her occasionally near her home as I passed through town on the highway." -- Jim Barker View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    NW OK Marriage 1942-43...

    Vol 5, Iss 7 Alva, Oklahoma - Julian- Thomas - Wednesday, February, 1942, NYC, NY - Betrothal of Miss Julian Is Announced - Julian-Thomas Wedding Vows Read in Riverside Drive Church - Mr. and Mrs. Dee Julian, Alva, announce the marriage of their daughter, Miss Gwendolyn Dee. Julian, to Ensign Howard Thomas, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Thomas, Alva, Wednesday afternoon at 4 o'clock in the Riverside Drive church, New York city, N.Y. The nuptial vows were read by the Rev. C. Leslie Glenn, Navy chaplain of the Prairie State college.

    Beck-Lancaster - October 12, 1942, Enid, Okla. - Marriage of Alva Couple Is Announced - Announcement has been made of the marriage of Miss Marie Back, daughter of Mrs. Patience L. Beck, Alva, to Alfred Lancaster, son of Mrs. Steve Lancaster, Alva. The wedding took place October 12, at Enid, with Justice Jacobs officiating the single ring ceremony.

    Lane-Gentry - 17 October 1942, Guthrie, Okla. - Jonnie Lane Becomes Bride of Byron Gentry In Quiet Wedding - Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Lane announce the marriage of their daughter, Jonnie, to Byron Gentry, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Gentry, Broken Bow, Oklahoma. The wedding took place October 17, in the parsonage of the Presbyterian church at Guthrie, with Rev. Hendrix officiating the double ring ceremony.

    Brunsteter-Owl - Saturday, October 31, 1942, Boston, Mass. - Former Alva Girl Is Wed In Simple Service In Boston - Announcement was made today by Mrs. W. G. Brunsteter, Alva, of the marriage of her daughter, Miss Della Brunsteter, to George Allen Owl, United States Army. The ceremony was performed in Boston, Massachusetts, at 11 o'clock, Saturday morning, October 31, in historic King's Chapel, which was established in 1688. The Reverend Emily Mayer performed the ceremony.

    Conrod-Litton - 4 November 1942, Sherman, Texas - Miss Dorylas Conrod Is Bride of Lieut. Nate B. Litton - Marriage vows uniting Miss Dorylas Conrod daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Conrod, Ada, Oklahoma, and Lieut. Nate B. Litton, son of Mrs. N. B. Litton, Alva, Oklahoma, were exchanged November 4, at Sherman, Texas.

    Estill-Bennett - Monday, November 16, 1942, Carrier, Okla. - Ruth Estill Becomes Bride of Lt. Bennett - Announcement is made of the marriage of Miss Ruth Estill, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Estill, Carrier, and Lieut. Virgil C. Bennett, Fort Worth, Texas, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Bennett, Drummond. The wedding took place in the Congregational church at Carrier, with Rev. Walter Ross, pastor, officiating, Monday evening, November 16.

    Hatcher-Wolgamott - Saturday, 17 November, 1942, Wichita, Kansas - Gwendolyn Hatcher and First Sgt. Wolgamott Wed November 17 - Announcement has been made of the marriage of Miss Gwendolyn Hatcher, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Hatcher, Alva, to First Sgt. Wilford E. Wolgamott, son of Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Wolgamott, Hardtner. Rev. Dewey performed the single ring ceremony in the Grace Methodist parsonage at Wichita, Kansas, Tuesday, November 17, at five o'clock. Mosshart-Brown - Thursday, December 3, 1942 - Mosshart-Brown Vows Exchanged - Mr. and Mrs. John Mosshart, Alva, announce the marriage of their daughter, Zona Mae, to Pvt. Buster B. Brown, Cherokee. The wedding took place Thursday, December 3, with Rev. Ray Vaughan officiating the single ring ceremony in the Christian church parsonage.

    Cordell-Werner - December 20, 1942, Alva, Okla. - Marriage of Miss Wanda Cordell To Bill Werner Is Announced - Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Cordell, 803 Third, Alva, announce the marriage of their daughter, Wanda, to Bill Werner, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Werner, Alva. The wedding took place at 3 p.m. December 20, at the home of the bride's parents. Rev. M.F. Langley, pastor of the Baptist church, officiated at the double-ring ceremony. McKitrick-Burke - Tuesday, December 22, 1942, Archie, Missouri - McKitrick-Burke Vows Exchanged December 22 - Announcement has been made of the marriage of Miss Gertrude McKitrick, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. B. McKitrick, 410 Center, to Staff Sgt. Rhodes W. Burke, son of R. M. Burke, Ochelata, Okla. The marriage took place Tuesday, December 22, at the home of Mrs. Jay Simpson, Archie, Missouri, with Rev. Jay Simpson, pastor of the Methodist church, officiating the double ring ceremony.

    Benton-Rauh - Thursday, December 31, 1942, Houston, Texas - Texas Girl Becomes Bride of Arthur Joh Rauh December 31 - Word has been received here of the marriage of Miss Ermal Benton, niece of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene C. Verhelle, Houston, Texas, to Arthur John Rauh, Houston, son of Alvin A. Rauh, Alva. The ceremony was read in the St. Paul's Methodist church, Thursday, December 31, by Rev. Charles F. Smith, a pastor of St. Paul's, at Houston.

    Wade-Sams - 31, December, 1942 - South Pacific Veteran Home On furlough to Get Married - Robert Sams Has Eleven Battles Tucked Under His belt; Was in Midway Action - Robert Sams Clippings - He came from many battles in the South Pacific with no scars only to get "socked in the puss" by Cupid! Robert Sams, 19-year old Alva sailor and former coxswain on the destroyer USS Gwin, returned home on a 15-day furlough, arriving here Christmas eve. And now he is going to marry Miss Jeannette Wade, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Wade, Enid. Sams, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. I. Sams, 524 Choctaw, has been in the navy a little over a year and is already a veteran of many battles on the seas of the South Pacific.

    Dobbs-O'Neil - Saturday, September, 1943 - Miss Maxine Dobbs Bride of Paul O'Neil - Miss Maxine Dobbs and Paul O'Neil were married Saturday September in Catholic church with Father Leo Claus officiating. Attendants for the couple were Mr. and Mrs. John O'Neil, brother and sister-in-law of the groom.

    Rackley-Dail - Thursday, September 2, 1943 - Mrs. Estella Rackley Weds Mr. John B. Dail Thursday - Announcement has bee made of the marriage of Estella Rackley to Mr. John B. Dail. The wedding took place Thursday morning, September 2, in the Presbyterian manse with Rev. L. T. Knotter, officiating.
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    Autobiography: Laura Margaret (Westfall) Fox

    Vol 11, Iss 51 The following autobiography was written by Laura Margaret Westfall Fox and sent to the OkieLegacy by Scott Stewart (email: scottstewart555@gmail.com). The autobiography begins below: I was born near Doniphan, Nebraska, July 30, 1892; the first child of Daniel sylvester and Rozella (Burger) Westfall.

    The autumn of 1893 in September, my father and Uncle Louis Levi Westfall went down to Oklahoma Territory which had been thrown open for settlement. They filed on land for a homestead each of 160 acres. The following spring of 1894 in April, they moved there to start a home.

    My grandmother, Eliza Jane Westfall, went with Uncle Lou to keep house for him. My aunt willie Tillie Ann was still with her mother, who was a widow. Her husband William Levi, having been shot on a train, of which he was conductor. Jesse James and gang had boarded the train and grandpa reached up to get a ticket from a man's hat band. Jesse thought he was going to ring the bell, to have them put off, so he up and shot him. So grandma moved to Nebraska with her three children, Daniel, age 12; Louis, 9 or 10; and Aunt Willie, 3 or 4.

    I heard Mama tell how the horses always followed a horse they called "Old Kit." And two or three times they got away and started back to Nebraska, Old Kit in the lead. The men discovered they were gone and took after them with the help of neighbors and brought them back.

    We generally went places in the wagon, which was broken down to only one board. At first the men drove 30 miles to Kiowa, Kansas, for supplies and later to Alva, Oklahoma which was a few miles closer.

    When the state was divided into counties, we lived in Woods County and Alva was the county seat. Later when I was a girl close to the teens, Woods was divided into three counties: Woods, Alfalfa and Major. We were in Alfalfa and our county seat was Cherokee.

    A little town, Augusta, was our trading post for a number of years. The men of the community got ball teams organized and I remember on Saturday P.M.'s, we would go down to Augusta to watch the games.

    And in the "fall" the Veterans of Civil War had a Reunion, generally three days. We always went, generally put seats on wagon and take a load.

    After a few years, some of the same carnival attractions we see today at the Fairs began setting up booths and Aid Societies had eating booths. They always had programs and get-togethers on memorial Day and Fourth of July.

    The first railway that came through near us and stopped at Augusta was the Chocataw (sic). Before 1910 another town called Carmen, which was about 2-1/2 miles east of Augusta was started. It was the result of another railway called the Orient and Mexico. Carmen was only about 1-1/2 miles from us and we went to trading there. One of the principal stores was Ebert and Henry, which was a general store. They would give credit from one harvest and threshing of wheat to next, which was some time in September.

    My father would go to Kansas and shuck corn for 50-cents a day in order to feed his family. Also, after the corn was gathered, he returned home and would go down about 25 miles southeast of us where the trees called Black Jacks grew. He would leave before daylight and generally got back the next evening with a load of wood on the frame work of the wagon, after getting the winter wood in for our needs. Then they (Uncle Lou and Pa) would each take a wagon and get loads and take them to Alva and sell them. After a few years the wheat harvest began to take care of our actual needs. Sometimes the wheat would be nearly a complete failure, so we had hard times occasionally.

    When I was 4 years old, my brother William was born. There was a Danish lady, Mrs. Geist, that was a mid-wife and she took care of Mamma.

    When I was 6 years old, my father had managed to haul enough lumber from Alva to build a house of lumber - 2 rooms downstairs and 2 upstairs. It was called a story and a half. In July the year I was six, my bother George was born.

    Going back to our start in Oklahoma, my father had taken what they call a breaking plow and plowed the virgin soil; then they picked up the pieces of soil, about 12"x18", and laid them each on top of the other with a mixture of sand, lime and water between them, to build our house.

    We lived in this house for six years. Part of the walls were plastered. When we first went there, my mother would put me in a little wood wagon she had and pull me over to grandma Westfall's, two miles from our house. Grandma generally drove Old Kit to a buggy they had brought from Nebraska, and brought us home.

    Mamma was about 22 years old when they came from Nebraska. There were rattle snakes, quite a lot and Mamma was very watchful and killed many with the hoe. We had an old dog we called Shag; and sometimes if he was watching me, he would grab a snake by the back of the neck and shake it to death.

    Our nearest neighbors was about 1/2 mile north of us. He was a Methodist preacher and she and the three oldest boys did most of their farming. There were seven children. The youngest girl was a year or so older than I, but we got along fairly well, unless there were older children present, then they tried to shut me out of the play. Their name was Lakey. And after I was old enough to take to Sunday School, they took me each Sunday to Augusta until I was about 9 or 10 years old.

    About 1903 the Christian church started a Sunday School in our school house about 1-1/2 miles north of us. I started going there, generally walking. Visiting Christian church preachers came through and preached for us. After the church started in Carmen, the preacher came out in the P.M. and preached to us. Sometime between 11 and 12 years of age, I made the beginning of a christian life. I was baptized the same day my mother was at Shockley's Pond.

    Some time between 13 and 18 years old, we began driving to Carmen on Sunday A.M. to the Christian church. My grandma Westfall came from the Christian church. She had one brother who was a preacher in the Christian church.

    I walked to school 1-1/2 miles from the time I was 7 years old to a school in the country with all eight grades. About 30 to 5 pupils attended with one teacher. My 1st teacher was Loren Neal. When I was in 3rd grade we had a teacher who drove to school each morning in a wagon. As he went past our house, we children rode with him.

    My school days in the one room school lasted from 7 years old to 15 years. Then as there wasn't many high schools, my father decided to let me go to Carmen to high school. It was a pleasant year.

    But the past County Superintendent, Mrs. McGreevy, talked Pa into letting me go back out to our own school as she was going to teach, so she took special interest in three of us girls and trained us to take Teacher's Exams in the spring.

    There were three grades - 3rd grade certificates; 2nd grade and 1st grade. A person started by trying for 3rd grade certificate. I passed the Exams and the year I was 18 I taught my first term of school, about 12 miles from home. My father would take me over on Sunday P.M. and I boarded with a Mrs. Griffin who lived right near the school house.

    When I think of how little I knew, I marvel that I ever taught that school. The youngsters in 8th grade, some were nearly as old as I. My 2nd term was right near Kansas border, Waldron, Kansas. I did not come home on weekends very often as I rode the train.

    My 3rd and 4th term was at West Clay about 3 or 4 miles east of our school. I drove a buggy and horse back and forth and boarded at home. My 5th term was at our own home District and I walked back and forth.

    My 6th term was up at Keystone. I boarded with the Frank Ice family. Their daughter Bertha was about my age, so it was a real pleasant year.

    I attended the M.E. Church there and that is where I met Fred. He walked me home to Ice's several times, leading his horse. He finally got a new buggy and drove me home near Carmen on Friday evenings and came after me on Sunday afternoons. These were very pleasant trips. We were married on June 11, 1916. We drove to Yewed, Oklahoma on Sunday P.M. to our pastor's home. Bertha (Ice) Davis and her husband was our witnesses. My brother, William, and Mamma and Raymond also were present.

    Fred and I began our married life in an old house about like the one we are now living in (1966). It was his grandma Hopkins place. 80 acres to seed to wheat. He had 3 or 4 horses, the one we thought the most of was "Old Don." He was the one we drove while courting. He had a cow or two and we raised a few pigs and chickens.

    I became pregnant soon after marriage. In those days the women knew very little about the care. At 5 months I visited our Dr. Welch who was in a little town of Dacoma. He didn't tell me to come back and so I didn't. At a little past 8 months I was so bloated and swollen with excess water that Fred's mother told me I'd better go to the doctor. As my eyes were so swollen and blurred, I said, "Yes."

    So Fred took me down that P.M. The doctor was horrified, but said very little. He gave me some pills, which brought on labor and also caused the passing of much water. I got so sick in a day or two I called Fred's mother and when she came over and saw me, she sent for Fred, who was working down at the church helping clean up after a small fire there.

    When he came home she told him to call the doctor. As the doctor was quite busy that night (5 babies he delivered) going from home to home, he couldn't come right away. When ours came they were twins. One of the babies we named Louis and the other Lawrence. Louis only lived 2 days.

    Lawrence was quite frail and slept so much we were worried he wouldn't live. I was so flighty and crazy and up on the chamber passing water that I couldn't sleep; so after 2 days and 1 night at high pitch, Fred got in bed with me and soothed and talked till finally I fell asleep for a small nap. Then I began to have sleep off and on until I was sleeping normally. It was nearly month before my eye sight got back to normal."
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    Steadman & Woods County Census - 1920 & 1930

    Vol 11, Iss 44 The photo on the left is a view of the 1920 census, Alva, Woods Co., Oklahoma.

    Steve was wondering if the 1920 census for his grandparents was available online and says, "I would like look my grandparents up in this 1920 census. That would be Wesley & Naomi Steadman, 819 5th street. Are these pages on the internet?"

    Steve goes on to say, "Grandmother Steadman's maiden name was Shelton. I don't know Flo's maiden name, but she was the widow of Albert Shelton (grandmother's oldest brother) a.k.a. Uncle Bertie, who was a medical missionary to Tibet, and murdered in about 1920 as he was going to Lasha to meet the Dali Lama. Flo was Doris's mother and lived with Doris Still most of her life. Flo is Flora Belle Shelton and was always treated as one of the family.

    "Prior to marriage grandmother worked in a flour mill and worked her way to the manager of the mill with a large staff of men. She had an expensive car and fur coat as a single woman at a time it was very unusual. Naomi was the best friend of Ruth Oliver Steadman, the first wife of Wesley and the woman who adopted mother. Grandmother never officially adopted mother, although she raised her from a 2 year old."

    1930 census, Alva, Woods co., Oklahoma Yes, Steve, they are on the internet at Ancestry.com. Ancestry.com membership is not free, though. That is why I am sharing that information for the two census (1920 & 1930) here in the OkieLegacy eZine.

    If you do not have an Ancestry.com membership and would like your ancestors looked up on Ancestry.com, send me the vital statistics of your ancestors, year, etc. and I will look it up and see what I can find for you.
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    The Bukowski History

    Vol 1, Iss 1 The following information on the Bukowski-Hurt was submitted by Alice Shook via her granddaughter. It should give you a feel for the lifestyle and hardships that the pioneers went through during that time. To see more Histgory go to Kachel History.

    Joseph Bukowski - (submitted by Alice Shook, 1998)
    In the Spring of 1890, at Grand Island, Nebraska, Barbara Carrie Hurt and Joseph Stanley Bukowski were united in marriage.

    In the early 1870's Barbara Hurt migrated to the United States from Austria Hungary (now Czechoslovakia) with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Hurt, when she was only four years old.

    The young couple established their first home on a farm near Ashton, Nebraska in Sherman County. The country was in one of its worst droughts. A contributing factor to the major depression of 1892-1893. Thousands of people were out of work and wages were extremely low.

    In 1895 Joseph and Barbara Bukowski, and their young children (Mary, Phillip and Edward) left their home in Sherman County, Nebraska and set out for the newly opened Oklahoma Territory. They loaded all their worldly possessions in covered wagons and traveled in a caravan across country.

    In the caravan with the Bukowski family were her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Hurt; and her brothers (Joseph, Johnny and Frank Hurt families). Others were the Jim Holubs and the Divorak family, and possibly others. All of these families came from Sherman or Howard Counties in Nebraska.

    There was still land to be homesteaded in Oklahoma Territory even tho they did not make the "Run". It quite possibly was the least desirable land, but in their hearts burned the desire to make a home in this new country, probably the first some of them ever had. All of them filed on claims, and proved up homesteads in the Orion Community of Major County. Living conditions were very hard, there was no money and very little to do with, but firewood could be had for the chopping!

    Their houses were built of blackjack logs, usually just one big room with an attic. Later more rooms were added on. Water was hauled from springs, until cisterns were dug, or wells "put down" for their water supply.

    Kerosene lamps and candles were used for lighting. The conquest of the land was not easy. Fields, gardens and orchards had to be "grubbed out" by hand, clearing the land of blackjack trees and brush before crops or gardens could be planted.

    Tragedy wasn't long in coming to the Bukowski family. Two small children (William and Lillie) born on the homestead died from whooping cough. They were buried in the "Old Hurt Cemetery" on her parent's land.

    The family returned to Nebraska where Joseph found work in a meat packing plant in Omaha. After a few years work and a little money ahead, Joseph went back to his Oklahoma homestead and put in a crop. Later he sent for his wife and family, now consisting of two more boys (Charley and Frank) who were born in Nebraska. Barbara and five children rode the train from Omaha to Alva, Oklahoma where they were met by Joseph driving a wagon and a fine team of horses. The family camped out that night close to the Cimarron River, driving the rest of the way to the homestead the next day.

    All their farming was done with horse drawn implements. Gardens were worked and taken care of by hand. They always raised a big garden as they had to "put up" most all their food supply. They dug caves to store a lot of their vegetables in, as well as keeping the milk and butter in a cool place. Fruits were canned or dried.

    After a few years of poor crops and other hardships, Joseph decided this was not his kind of country. he took his three oldest sons and went back to Nebraska. By this time two more children (Leo and Anna) had been added to the family, and another baby on the way.

    Joseph left his sons (Philip, Edward and Charley) with his mother in Nebaska and went to Canada where he established a new home and never returned to the United States, except for a short visit or two to see his childern. Joseph Bukowski passed away in Saskatchewan, Canada, September 1942, leaving a family there.

    Mrs. Barbara Bukowski and family continued to live on the homestead. The baby (Louie) was born and died within a few months time. Finally with help from some of her neighbors and relatives, she and the children went back to Nebraska where she got her three oldest sons. They rented a house in St. Paul, Nebraska, and she and the older children all worked in a cannery. After some time she decided her children would be better off on the farm, so she took her family and once again returned to the Oklahoma homestead to live. The boys worked out for the neighbors, pulling broomcorn for as little as $.50 per day. My (Alice Shook's) mother (Mary) cooked and cleaned in the old Floyd's Hotel in Fairview for $2.00 per week when she was only fourteen years old.

    Times were very hard for the family. Uncle Ed remembers that they did get a milk cow some how, so they had milk, cream and butter. And they always raised plenty of sweet potatoes, squash, turnips, cabbage and pie-melons. He said, "Grandmother made some very tasty preserves out of the pie-melons."

    When the boys were not busy in the fields, they enjoyed catching rabbits, quail, or squirrels, all which helped to put meat on the family table.

    At the time there were several country stores scattered around the countryside, such as Orion, Chester or Phroso where the family could buy a few staple groceries and a gallon of kerosene for their lamps. There were also some old mills, where the family could take their corn and have it ground into meal. Very little wheat flour was used. Uncle Ed remembered an old mill that Mr. Cossel had that was run by windmill, so the family would always go to the mill with their sack of corn on a windy day! The Bukowski children all attended the Old Orion School. School only lasted for a few months in the winter time, as the pupils were all farmers children and were needed a home to work.

    When her children were all grown, Barbara went back to Nebraska to make her home in St. Paul. A few years later she and son Frank moved to Oregon where three of her children were already living. Barbara passed away and is buried at Eugene, Oregon. Her son (Leo) had died while still a teenager and is buried in the Fairview, Oklahoma cemetery. Mary (Bukowski) Kachel passed away at Beaver, Oklahoma and is buried in the Beaver Cemetery. She and her husband (Sam) both died in the Summer of 1966.

    Frank Bukowski died in 1972 and Phillip S. Bukowski died in July 1975, both in Cottage Grove, Oregon and are buried there. The three remaining children are Edward J. Bukowski of Harrisburg, Oregon; Anna Bush of Cottage Grove, Oregon; and Charles Bukowski who lives in Kearney, Nebraska.
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    1913 April, Gallows Finish Of Illicit Love

    Vol 17, Iss 32 Alva, OK - As the "Wichita Beacon" reported, 28 Arpil 1913, Monday, page 1: "Gallows Finish Of Illicit Love." The Judge of Appeals affirmed Alva Murder Case. Lawyer Miller sentenced to Life for murder of Mabel Oakes - his dupe - Judge Furman said hangman was cheated.

    Found on Newspapers.com

    Oklahoma City, April 28 (1913) -- The gallows was cheated when the District Court of Woodward County convicted N. L. Miller for the murder of Mabel Oakes and sentenced him to the penitentiary for life, declared Judge Henry M. Furman, of the Criminal Court of Appeals, in an opinion affirming the decision of the lower court. following an extended courtship, by Miller, who promised to get a divorce from his wife and marry Miss Oakes, the girl was found dead in a room adjoining Miller's office in Alva, November 9, 1910. Expert testimony showed that the girl had met her death by strangulation and at the hands of some person other than herself.

    Miss Oakes was working in the office of the defendant before her death and Miller had confided his affection for her and his domestic troubles to several of his friends. The evidence given concerned an evening's buggy ride, a day of tears for the girl, a subsequent liaison, the promise of marriage by the defendant, who had been estranged from his wife, and the sudden death of the girl, who formerly was a healthy and happy young woman.

    Four weeks before the crime was committed there was a reconciliation in the Miller family, but he girl was soon to become a mother. An operation was performed upon her, presumably by Miller. Then came the end.

    At the trial three physicians and an expert chemist were called upon for their opinion as to the probable cause of death. All of these strongly incriminated Miller.

    Speaking of the case, Judge Furman declared, "Illicit love will sink its victims to a greater degradation and prompt the commission of more desperate deeds and unjustifiable crimes than any passion to which poor, erring mortality is the slave."

    And in closing the opinion, he says, "We believe that the gallows was cheated of its due when the jury failed to inflict the death penalty upon appellant. The protection of female purity requires that such conduct, of which appellant has been guilty, should receive the most severe possible punishment."
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    Herold-Varner 1936-37 Marriage

    Vol 15, Iss 8 Alva, OK - The Herold-Varner marriage of 1936 or 1937 took place on a Saturday afternoon, when Johnnie M. Varner, Alva, and Miss Lillian May Herold, Alva, were united in marriage by Judge J. J. Glaser in the Review-Courier's public wedding on the court house steps. The marriage was pronounced by Judge Glaser in the following words:

    "My friends, in this hour when you are about to take the step which will result in the establishment of a new home in the land, I would have you enter upon this new relationship not in sport or frivolity, but rather seriously and fully realizing all it shall mean.

    "The establishment of a new home in the land is of great importance and grave concern, and incurs great responsibilities.

    "It is a matter of importance and concern not only to you two fine young people, but it is of grave concern to the community where you shall reside - of grave concern to the state and to the nation. Whether a home is foundation in love is of great importance.

    "Whether that home shall be one where love and harmony shall be enthroned depends entirely upon you. If love and harmony shall not reign supreme, the consequences can not be confined to the limits of the sphere of the influence of your own lives, but must of necessity affect many others.

    "This is an occasion for joy and happiness, certainly, but it also is an occasion for serious mindedness.

    "In anticipation of the happiness that shall be yours, and in the full realization of the responsibilities that shall rest upon you, I now ask:

    "Mr. Varner, do you take this woman to be your wedded wife? Do you promise to love, honor and cherish her - forsaking all others, be faithful unto her in the love and affection of your heart so long as you shall both live?

    "Miss Herold, do you take this man to be your wedded husband? Do you promise to love, honor and cherish him - forsaking all others, be faithful unto him in the love and affection of your heart so long as you shall both live?

    "By virtue of your mutual, promises, and by authority vested in me as judge of the county court of Woods County, Oklahoma, it is my good pleasure, and I now pronounce you husband and wife.

    "May the blessing of God be upon you. May long years together be yours - crowned with peace and contentment - and may love reign supreme in your lives to the end." View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Pioneer Jerome Robert Gamble

    Vol 14, Iss 7 Woods County, Oklahoma - Are there any descendants of this pioneer, Jerome Robert Gamble, out there online? The following information about this pioneer that settled in Woods county, Oklahoma Territory near Alva was taken from History of Oklahoma, page 1497, written by Joseph B. Thoburn.

    Jerome Robert Gamble was born November 30, 1874, at Lancaster, Missouri, a son of Jerome Bonaparte and Mary B. (Frank) Gamble. His father, who was born near Nashville, Tennessee, in 1847, was the son of a farmer, who who came to Missouri at an early day, and early in life the son left the farm and began the study of law. From the age of seventeen he had taught school, and at the age of twenty-four was admitted to the bar at Lancaster, Missouri.

    Though his early life was one of considerable hardship and out of sheet necessity he had educated himself, he became a prominent lawyer and for twenty years practiced at Lancaster, Missouri. he also took an active part in democratic politics, and for a number of years was county attorney of Schuyler county.

    In 1888 he removed to Manhattan, Kansas, practiced there two years, and was then located at Wallace, Kansas, nine years. In 1900 he brought his family Alva, Oklahoma, and was one of the members of the Woods county bar until his death in 1905.

    Jerome B. Gamble was married at Lancaster, Missouri, in 1868, to Mary B. Frank, a daughter of Sanford frank, and she was born in 1853. There were eight children in the family. Back when this History of Oklahoma book was published Alma Matilda was the wife of Benjamin Johnson of Fredonia, Kansas; the next two were twins, a son and daughter, who died in infancy; Jerome Robert; Myrtle Mary, widow of B. M. Spaulding, living at El Campo, Texas; and Carrie Etta, wife of C. J. Snoddy, a farmer in Woods county, Oklahoma.

    Jerome R. Gamble finished his education in the public schools of Manhattan and Wallace, Kansas. Prior to that time, at the age of twelve, and following an enthusiasm which has led a great many boys into the printing and newspaper business, he found opportunities to learn the printing trade in an office at Lancaster, Missouri. He finished his apprenticeship at Sharon Springs, Kansas, and at the age of twenty bought the office of the People's Voice at Sharon Springs, and was editor and owner of that small journal two years. When he sold out he then secured an interest in the daily and weekly Pioneer of Alva, and was one of its editors and proprietors four years. Since that date that he was out of the newspaper business altogether and had a large clientage as a real estate and loan broker.

    In politics Mr. Gamble was a democrat, and for two years served on the state committee from Woods County. He was one of the veterans of the Spanish-American war. Early in that period of hostilities in 1898 he enlisted as a private in Company L of the Second United States Volunteer Infantry, a regiment that was of the "Rough Rider" class and was recruited from the territories of Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico and Indian Territory.

    On January 1, 1902, at Alva Mr. Gamble married Miss Evangeline Matilda Lloyd, daughter of the Rev. R. Thomas Lloyd. Mrs. Gamble was born February 28, 1875. To their marriage were born four children: Robert jerome, who died in infancy; Daisy Marie; Robert jerome; and Thomas Frederick, born August 20, 1914. Gamble and his family were members of the Episcopal Church.

    A Standard History of Oklahoma -- by Joseph B. Thoburn is an authentic narrative of its development front the date of the first European Exploration down to the time of 1916, including accounts of the Indian tribes, both civilized and wild, of the cattle range, of the land openings and the achievements of the most recent period. Joseph B. Thoburn was assisted by a Board of Advisory Editors when he compiled this history of Oklahoma, Volume IV, published by the American Historical Society, Chicago and New York, in 1916. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    OBIT: VIRGIL LEROY RUSSELL (93) - Fairvalley & Freedom, OK

    Vol 13, Iss 4 Fairvalley, Oklahoma - Maybe there are a few Fairvalley and Freedom, Oklahomans out there that remember Virgil Leroy Russell. I remember seeing him out at Fairvalley a few times when I was out there, but that has been awhile ago. Virgil would ride his 4-wheel vehicle from his homestead south of McGill Sisters land to his mailbox at the curve of the Freedom/Fairvalley blacktop road. Virgil has been and will be missed around the Freedom and Fairvalley, in Northwest Oklahoma

    Virgil Russell passed away on January 18, 2011 at the Clinton Veterans Center at the age of 93 years. Funeral services for Virgil Leroy Russell, were held at 2 p.m., Saturday, January 22, 2011, at the United Methodist Church, Freedom, Oklahoma with Rev. Ray Hull, officiating. Interment was held in the Fairvalley Cemetery under the direction of Marshall Funeral Home of Alva.

    Virgil Leroy Russell was one of eleven children of the late James and Amanda (Littrell) Russell. Virgil was born March 16, 1917 in Woods County, Oklahoma near Fairvalley. He passed away on January 18, 2011 at the Clinton Veterans Center at the age of 93.

    Virgil was born, raised and lived his entire life on land homesteaded by his parents. He attended Fairvalley School. On January 2, 1942 he was united in marriage to Helen Dutton Russell at Freedom, Oklahoma. He was soon sent to World War II where he served as a tank driver in the U. S. Army, receiving a Purple Heart for injuries sustained in battle.

    After Virgil's return from military service he and Helen raised a family on their farm southeast of Freedom. Throughout his life, he was active in the Morning Star, Freedom, and Woodward Baptist churches where he especially enjoyed singing hymns. In addition to raising cattle, Virgil worked on the railroad and drove a school bus for many years.

    Helen preceded him in death on August 29, 2004. He was also preceded in death by 5 sisters and 2 brothers.

    Survivors include six children and their spouses, Bob and Debi Russell of Jackson, Tennessee; Sherry and Bobby Russell, Lida and Tom Russell of Minco, Oklahoma; Jim and Annette Russell of Los Alamos, New Mexico; Tom and Julie Russell of Freedom, OK; and JoNell and Greg Roszyk of Crestline, CA; nine grandchildren, Jeannie Snow, Angie and Galen Humphrey, Nathan Russell, Paul Russell, Cody Dodson, Corey and Jill Russell, Jordan and Jessica Russell, Lucas Russell and Sarah Russell; 8 great-grandchildren; brothers Ralph Russell of Waynoka, Harley and Alice Russell of Ruskin, Florida and one sister Bonnie Dutton Glasgow of Winfield, Kansas; other relatives and friends.

    In later years, Virgil was blessed with a very special friend Leta Williams of Woodward. They enjoyed attending church, having lunch, and visiting over the phone. Marshall Funeral Homes Obit - Virgil Russell View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Insight Into Grandma & John C. McClure

    Vol 11, Iss 29 This week we find ourselves looking back to March, 1905, with four more letters from John C. McClure, of Altona, Illinois, and sent to Miss Constance Warwick of Alva, Oklahoma Territory.

    We find out this week that the first part of March, 1905, John is still in Altona, Illinois, but on the Wednesday before March 31st, Saturday, 1905 John C. McClure showed up in Alva, Oklahoma Territory, allegedly working at The First National Bank of Alva, Oklahoma and taken care of business at his farm near Alva.

    March 2, 1905, postmarked Altona, Ill., 4 p.m. -- "Mar. 2, 1905, 5:00 a.m., Miss Constance Warwick, Alva, Okla., Dear Friend, You may think that 5 o'clock in the morning is a pretty time to be writing a letter, but you know the early bird always gets the worm. Well, I'm not after the worm or the worms class, but am just going to answer your esteemed letter of recent date.

    "I am setting up with a boy, who has influenza of the Heart. He is at his sweethearts home. Was spending sunday eve here, when he had an attack. They thought he was dead for a long time. This has been his second attack of heart failure. He is liable to have an attack most any time and if he were alone, he would surely go. Blessed are the pure in Heart.

    "I do hope you are over the fever. Don't you think it is heart failure instead?

    "We are having mud about a foot deep now. Snow is nearly all gone. There is going to be an excursion from here next Tues. $15.00 for round trip. Nellie's father is going. I told the folks I was going too. They think I am.

    "You spoke again about a picture. I never believed you wanted one before, but I will change my mind now. I would have had one taken some time ago, but was waiting, thinking perhaps I might improve my face, and then we have no good photographers around here. But you shall have one (if you are a good girl).

    "I will close as the roosters are crowing. Hopeing to hear from you next time the mail man comes. I am a mourning star, John C. McClure. Excuse lead pencil because I am not at home. Bye Bye Bye Bye."

    March 13, 1905, postmarked Altona, Ill., 4 p.m. -- "Altona, Ill., Mar. 12, 1905, Miss Constance Warwick, Alva, Okla., Dear Friend, I received your esteemed letter yesterday. It might do for a cousin to order the style of paper, but you know better than I, it would be my finish. Any old paper would be graciously received by me. I know you think I'm a fool.

    "We have not had any rain this Spring, and not nearly as much mud as we generally have. There are still some snow drifts along the fences.

    "Your County Superintendent must have an eye for business, for if I remember correctly that lot of School moms were individually pretty good looking.

    "I believe you are building air castles again. Resigning your school, working in an insurance office, visiting in California, seeing the sights in Portland, Going to Texas and latter but not least finishing a combine course in three months.

    "We had an anniversary at our house last Friday. It was the 25th anniversary of mother's and father's marriage. Of course, the best part was the dinner.

    "I have a chance to take a position as "order and bill clerk" in a factory, but I don't know whether I will take it, or got to Chicago. If I got to the white city, I will go the latter part of the week.

    "I have started to build air castles for this summer. First, I'm going to Alva if I'm wanted. If I'm not, well then I'm going to Portland, stopping at points between here and there. I'm liable to got to Texas. Ha.

    "Mr. Peters, Nellie's hub. said wheat was awful poor especially ours. Will you go over and look it over. Nit!

    "That boy that had heart trouble is alright now. I guess he has got it all the time.

    "I'm going to send you a model Love letter that was given me in Quincy. I happen to have it here in my pocket just now, is the reason I thought of it. You may use it, but not on me. Ever Your Friend, J. C. McClure.

    "I won't write anything you can't read, so here is the shorthand. Write soon, and oblige, Your truly." [then John writes Constance's name in shorthand with the following:] "P.S. Ask that other known man if I have written lately to Nellie. John McClure."

    March 31, 1905, Alva, Okla. -- There were two letters written at this March 31, 1905 date. The first letter was written on "The First National Bank" of Alva, Oklahoma, stationary and addressed to Miss Warwick, Alva, Okla., with no postage stamp or postmark on envelope.

    The First National Bank of Alva, Oklahoma stationary at the upper-left corner had the following information: "The First National Bank of Alva, Oklahoma. J. A. Stine, President, Geo. W. Crowell, Vice Pres., G. E. Nickel, cashier, Frank G. Munson, asst. cashier.

    It began, "Miss Constance Warwick, Alva, Okla., Dear Friend, You will be perhaps be surprised to get a letter from me Postmarked at Alva. I came to Alva last Wed., and am in the First National Bank here. I was out to the farm one day, and have been very busy ever since, so have not had a chance to see anybody. I would like very much to come out and see you if you would care to have me. Hoping I may hear from you, I remain Your Friend."

    An additional short note was sent in another envelope with a 2-cent stamped envelope with no postmarked visible, to Miss Constance Warwick, RFD, Alva, Okla.

    It began, "Alva, Okla., Sun., Miss Constance Warwick, Last eve I wrote you a letter, which I suppose you will get, but in my hurry to put it in the mail with the bank's mail, did not sign my name, so I guess I had better tell you who I am. Wishing to hear from you, I am J. C. McClure, Box 133."
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    About Moorman "Moman" Pruiett

    Vol 14, Iss 9 Oklahoma - Moman Pruiett defended many cases in early Indian Territory. In November, 1910, though, Pruiett was on the prosecutions side in the trial of N. L. Miller vs. State of Oklahoma for the alleged murder in the Old Opera House Murder of Alva, Oklahoma>. Pruiett was working with the "Law Enforcement League" back then. It was thought that Moman's wife had relatives in the Alva area at this time (1910).

    Moman's father was a Confederate Captain Warren Legrande Pruiett, Kentucky. Warren Legrand Pruiett, while serving in the Confederate Army during the Civil War, was captured and sent to a prisoner of war camp. He was released following the end of the fighting. He returned to find his homeland destroyed by the war and his first wife, Martha Harris Pruiett, dead. He had two sons, Oscar and Albert, and a daughter, Anna, by his first wife. On March 23, 1869, he married Elizabeth Louise Laws Moorman. She was 19 and he was 42. This was Captain Pruiett's second marriage. The Captain tried his hand at raising tobacco in 1880-82 - At some point they moved to Rogers, Arkansas while the captain cut beef for the railroad workers and his wife ran a bordering house, feed the railroad workers.

    Moman's mother's folks were the Moormans near Elizabethtown, Hardin County, Kentucky. Moman's mother was Elizabeth Louisa "Betty" Moorman. Moman's mother Elizabeth Louisa Laws Moorman Pruiett, was his most dedicated, loyal, and staunch supporter. She saw him through years of poverty and deprivation and his time in prison, but she never gave upon her dream of him becoming a famous lawyer. She divorced her first husband, Thomas Laws, when he joined the Union Army at the outbreak of the Civil War.

    Moman was born Moorman Pruiett (1873 near Louisville) aboard the Gray Eagle, a steamship operated by the Louisville and Evansville Packet Company, on the Ohio River between Louisville, Kentucky and Cincinnati, Ohio.

    It was 1900 when Pruiett was 27 years of age -- average height, heavy square shoulders, robust brown neck which lint him the appearance of physical strength and endurance -- also coal black hair, black brows unnaturally shaggy and prominent.

    The Texas Governor and later US Senator Charles A. Culberson paroled Moorman Pruiett from the Texas State prison at Rusk, Texas June 18, 1895. Three years previously Pruiett had been convicted of robbery and sentenced to five years in prison. Culberson's belief that Pruiett had reformed was justified in 1900 when he witnessed Moman taking the oath granting him the right to practice before the US Supreme Court. Moman Pruiett of Pauls Valley, I. T. formerly of Paris, Texas was admitted to practice before the Supreme Court in 1900 - that was just incidental to his real business in Washington - to save Chas. S. Bias from the gallows in southern Indian Territory.

    Moman Pruiett had no schooling -- he served time in Arkansas before getting in trouble in Texas - he served 3 years of the 5 years in Texas prison when Gov. Culberson turned him over to Pruiett's mother -- a devoted, persistent women.
    v Moman was considered a genius -- a little on the crooked side -- shefty -- head full of the damnedest brains with a belly full of guts - No education except for the law books he read in the attorney's office that he cleaned. Moman was tall and learned his lessons the hard say. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Great Uncle Charley McGill

    Vol 13, Iss 39 Capron, Oklahoma - Gr-Uncle Charley and Gr-Aunt Sis still rest underneath the shade of the two overgrown cedar trees in a NW Oklahoma Cemetery located in Woods County. The grave marker where Charles Robert McGill is buried with his wife, Elizabeth Nelson-Kidd McGill, are in the Capron Cemetery, Block 2, Lot 33, Plot 3 & 2, Woods County, Oklahoma.

    According to Gr-Uncle Charley's Obit, Charles R. McGill was born in McPherson, Kansas, Sept. 5, 1884. Gr-Uncle Charley came to Alva, Woods County, O.T. with his parents in 1895. He attended the Goshen School District, Northwestern State Normal School. In 1905 Charley was the teacher at the Bethel School. He also taught school at Manila rural school and Gate, Oklahoma.

    In 1909, Charley gave up teaching to become owner/operator of the McGill Drug Company & Garage in Capron, Oklahoma before entering the service in 1917 (WWI). According the the 1911 edition of The Capron Hustler, 9 June 1911, Charles married Elizabeth Nelson-Kidd (dau. of Captain John Nelson and Eliza Jane Boggess) at the home of the Presbyterian pastor (Rev. Kirkpatrick) in Woodward, Oklahoma.

    Elizabeth Nelson (a.k.a. Aunt Sis) was born Feb. 19, 1871. She died Nov. 8, 1952. Elizabeth had a son by a previous marriage to her first husband, Daniel Kidd.

    Gr-Uncle Charley and Gr-Aunt Sis still rest their ancestral bones beneath the shade of the old cedar trees. Their grave marker is located under two, overgrown cedar trees, east of the Kidd family markers. The cemetery photo above was taken looking east towards the blacktop road that runs in front of Capron cemetery, in NW Oklahoma. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    NW Oklahoma Marriages Of 1941

    Vol 15, Iss 1 Alva, OK - Here are some other OkieLegacy archives we found while doing our Winter cleaning. It gives a list of marriages of 1941 back during the beginning of World War II.

    Irwin-Frieze - Thursday, ca. 1941 - California Girl Becomes Bride of Berton D. Frieze - Of interest throughout the community is the wedding of Miss Zella Irwin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Irwin of Freedom, and Mr. Berton D. Frieze of Alva. The single ring ceremony was performed by Rev. Otto Hoyer, minister of the Lutheran church Thursday evening at eight-thirty at the home of Mrs. Clara Frieze, 802 Barnes, Alva, Okla.

    Simms-Marsh -Thursday, ca. 1941 - Miss Jean Simms, Charles Marsh Are Married - A marriage of interest to their many friends, is that of Miss Jean Simms, daughter of Mr. And Mrs. O. O. Simms, and Charles Marsh, son of Mr. And Mrs. C. A. Marsh, Webster City, Iowa. The wedding vows were read Thursday afternoon at 3:45 at the home of the bride's parents, with Rev. M. F. Langley officiating.

    Callison-Hull - Friday, April 4, 1941 - Miss Eleanor Callison, Edward Hull Are Married Friday Evening - Miss Eleanor Almeda Callison was united in marriage to Edward Earl Hull, at 5:15p.m. Friday at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. And Mrs. E. R. Callison, 1027 Choctaw. Mr. Hull is the son of Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Hull, 1024 Normal. He is a member of the U. S. Army stationed at Fort Knox, Ky., but is soon to be transferred to Pine Camp, New York, where they will make their home.

    Young-Donley - Sunday, April 13, 1941 - Nanci Ann Young, Lowell Donley Are Married Sunday - A marriage of interest to their many friends is that of Miss Nanci Ann Young, daughter of Scott Young, and Lowell Donley, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Donley. The marriage vows were read Sunday at three o'clock in the Methodist parsonage with Rev. George Parkhurst officiating. The single ring ceremony was used.

    Shirley-Bradbury - Tuesday, May 6, 1941, Yuma, Ariz. - Miss Vera Shirley, Robert A. Bradbury Are Married May 8 - Of interest to the people of Alva is the marriage of Miss Vera Shirley, formerly of Alva, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Orville Shirley, Alva and Robert A. Bradbury, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Bradbury, Tacoma, Wash. The wedding vows were read Tuesday, May 6, in Yuma, Ariz.

    Tidwell-Adams - Sunday, June 15, 1941 - Miss Hazel Tidwell, Robert Lee Adams Are Married June 15 - A wedding of interest to their many friends is that of Miss Hazel Tidwell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Tidwell, and Robert Lee Adams, son of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Adams, Hardtner, Kans. The marriage vows were read at the Cedar Grove church, Sunday, June 15, at one o'clock by Rev. M. F. Bess.

    Howell-Hickerson - Sunday, June 15, 1941 - In a pretty ceremony Sunday morning, June 15, in Alva, Oklahoma, Miss Mary Dorine Howell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Howell, Alva, became the bride of Mr. Herman H. Hickerson, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Hickerson, Alva. The wedding vows were read at ten o'clock in the First Methodist church parsonage at Enid, with Rev. F. S. Crowe officiating.

    NW OK Marriages - 1940s

    Thompson-Marcy - Friday, 1940 - Lenore Thompson and Fred Marcy Married Friday Mr. and Mrs. Earnest G. Thompson of Helena, announce the marriage of their daughter Lenore, to Fred E. Marcy, son of Mr. and Mrs. Burton E. Marcy of Topeka, Kans. The wedding vows were read Friday night at the Methodist parsonage with Rev. George Parkhurst officiating.

    Kish-Polson - Saturday, ca 1940 -Miss Emma Kish Is The Bride of Rodney Polson - A marriage of interest to the people of Alva is that of Miss Emma Kish, daughter of Mrs. Elizabeth Kish, and Mr. Rodney Polson, son of Mrs. Mary Polson, Wichita. The single ring ceremony was read Saturday morning at nine-thirty in the Sacred Heart church with Father Leo Claus officiating.

    Healy-Beller - September 21, 1940, Bueyeros, NM - (written by Bueyeros Correspondent) - Emmett Healy, of Wichita, Kans. and Miss Theresa Beller, Bueyeros, were united in the holy bonds of matrimony at 9 o'clock on the morning of September 21 at Bueyeros church, Rev. Fr. G. Patrick Smith officiating.

    Oldham-Leach - Sunday, October 20, 1940 - Pretty Sunday Rites Unite Young Couple - Miss Verna Maxine Oldham, daughter of Mrs. Oliver Pinkney Oldham, became the bride of Robert Hanson Leach, son of Mr. and Mrs. Earl G. Leach of Wellington, Kansas at a pretty ceremony Sunday afternoon, October 20, at 4 o'clock in the First Presbyterian Chapel of Alva, Oklahoma. Rev. Ray Vaughan was assisted by Rev. L. T. Knotter of the First Presbyterian church.

    Montgomery-Frieden (sic) - Friday, November 22, 1940 - Montgomery-Frieden Engagement Announced - Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Montgomery, 804 Barnes Avenue, announce the engagement and approaching marriage of their daughter, Electa Lee, to Dale E. Freiden (sic), son of Mr. and Mrs. E. Freiden of Burlington, Okla. The wedding will take place on Friday, November 22, at 7:00 in the home of the bride's parents.

    Smith-Dale - Saturday, November 23, 1940 - Smith-Dale Marriage Announced - Mr. and Mrs. Melvin T. Smith, 910 Locust, announce the marriage of their daughter, Helen Marie, to Stephen Homer Dale, son of Stephen M. Dale of Follette, Texas. The marriage took place Saturday night, November 23, in the parsonage of the Christian church with Rev. Ray Vaughan of the Christian church officiating.

    Evans-Calkins - Saturday, February 1, 1941, Tulsa, Okla. - Julia Evans To Wed Edwin Calkins of Tulsa - A marriage of interest to the people of Alva is that of Miss Julia Joy Evans, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Evans of Alva, and Edwin Crain Calkins, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Calkins of Omaha.

    Dautel-Eutsler - Saturday, December 7, 1940 - Dautel- Eutsler Marriage Announced - Of interest to their many friends is the marriage of Miss Betty Jo Dautel, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. O. Dautel, 818 Normal Street and Mr. Bradford Eutsler, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Eutsler.

    Stout-Clark - Wednesday, 1941, Lawton, Okla. - Stout-Clark Marriage Announced - Of interest to the Alva people is the marriage of Miss Fern Stout of Higgins, Texas, and Paul Clark, son of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Clark, of Alva.

    Wesner-Rath - Thursday, 1941 - Miss Sylvia Wesner, Roger Rath Are Married Thursday - Mrs. Maude Wesner announces the marriage of her daughter Sylvia, to Mr. Roger Rath, son of Mrs. Charles Rath of Denver, Colorado. The marriage took place in the First Baptist church Thursday evening at 7:30 with Rev. M. F. Langley officiating, using the single ring ceremony.

    Brickman-Broyles - January 1, 1941 - Brickman-Broyles Engagement Announced -Mr. and Mrs. Ben Brickman announce the engagement and approaching marriage of their daughter, Esta Belle, to Mr. Floyd Broyles of Denver, Colo. The wedding date is set for New Years Day, January 1, 1941. In an attractive home wedding Miss Esta Belle Brickman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Brickman, became the bride of Mr. Floyd E. Broyles, son of Mrs. O. O. Davis of Denver, Colorado, at noon on New Year's. Rev. L. T. Knotter of the Presbyterian church officiated using the double ring ceremony.

    Reed-Schwab - Saturday, January 26, 1941 - Reed-Schwab Approaching Marriage Announced - Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Reed, 405 E. Barnes, wish to announce the engagement and approaching marriage of their daughter, Rose Ella, to Mr. Kenneth Delano Schwab, of Cherokee. Kenneth Schwab, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Schwab of Cherokee.

    Clark-Parker - Saturday, February 8, 1941, Lawton, Oklahoma - Cleta Lucille Clark and Harold Parker Married Saturday - Mr. and Mrs. Harry Clark, Tegarden, announce the marriage of their daughter, Cleta Lucille, to Harold Eugene Parker, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Parker of Avard. The wedding was an event of February 8th at Lawton, Okla. Mrs. Parker will make her home with her parents at the present time, while Mr. Parker is taking a years training at Fort Sill, Okla.

    Mott-Clark - Saturday, February 22, 1941 - Vona L. Mott, Glenn W. Clark Marriage Announced - Mrs. W. H. Mott of Carmen announces the marriage of her daughter, Vona L. to Glenn W. Clark, son of Dr. and Mrs. A. W. Clark Saturday, February 22 in the Christian church of Enid with Rev. Robert Martin officiating.

    Otte-Schupbach - Sunday March 16, 1941, Pasadena, Calif. - Miss Fern Otte, Ralph A. Schupbach Married March 16 - Miss Fern Otte, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Otte, became the bride of Ralph A. Schupbach, son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Schupbach, Sunday, March 16. The single ring ceremony was read by Rev. J. A. Schlicting in the Mount Olive Lutheran church, Pasadena, Calif.

    Miller-Hansen - Wednesday, March 12, 1941 - Miss Mildred Miller - Mr. Charles Hansen Are Married Wednesday - Miss Mildred Miller, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. O. B. Miller, Alva, became the bride of Charles Hansen, son of Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Hansen, of Goodwell, Wednesday evening, March 12, at the Christian church parsonage. Rev. G. R. Vaughan read the wedding vows using the single ring ceremony. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Dacoma (OK) Pioneer - Albert Wesley Lewis

    Vol 14, Iss 7 Dacoma, Oklahoma - Those living in the vicinity of Dacoma, Oklahoma might remember this pioneer lumber company business manager and treasurer, Albert Wesley Lewis. Albert was manager and treasurer of the Dacoma Lumber Company and of the Dacoma Grain Company, and was one of the most prominent.

    Albert Wesley Lewis had been a resident of Dacoma since 1904, and since that time had participated in all movements that had made for its growth and development, at the same time contributing of his abilities in managing its civic affairs.

    Mr. Lewis was born on a farm in Iowa county, Iowa, 19 July 1867, and was the son of William Wesley and Susan Jane (Rogers) Lewis. His father was born in the City of Cincinnati, Ohio, of Scotch ancestry, and had spent his entire career in agricultural pursuits. AS a young man he removed to Iowa, where he resided until 1877, when he removed to Kansas and located on Government land in Pratt County. There he served as postmaster of the Town of Naron for eight years, and during 1879 and 1880, in the turbulent period regarding the location of the county seat, was a member of the board of county commissioners. In 1888, with his family, he removed to "No Man's Land," a strip ceded to the United States by Texas in 1850, for many years without any government, and now constituting Beaver county, Oklahoma, where he handled cattle on the open range. In 1892 Mr. Lewis participated in the opening of the Sac and Fox Indian Reservation, taking claims with his four sons in what is now Lincoln County, where he continued to be engaged in farming for nine years.

    At the end of that time he moved to Alva, where he was living in comfortable retirement. Mr. Lewis was married in 1850 to Miss Susan Jane Rogers, who was born March 13, 1837, in Pennsylvania, a daughter of Samuel Rogers, a native of the Keystone State. Five sons and four daughters were born to this union, as follows: Ida, who is the wife of henry Burns, of Prague, Oklahoma; Margaret, who was the wife of W. R. Dennison, of Alva, Oklahoma; Dewey, a resident of Meeker, Oklahoma; Austin, who lived at Carmen, Oklahoma; GEorge, who died in infancy; Columbus W., of Hardtner, Kansas; Albert Wesley, of this notice; Carrie, who married in 1893 John Godfrey, and died in 1911 at South Greenfield, Missouri; and Laura, who died in 1910 at Pawnee, Oklahoma, as the wife of Charles Stevens.

    The public schools of Pratt County, Kansas, furnished Albert Wesley Lewis with his educational training,and he grew up in the atmosphere of the farm. He was 21 years of age when he accompanied his parents to "No Man's Land," so that he may be said to be something more than a pioneer of Oklahoma. Later he was one of the first settlers of what is now Lincoln County, Oklahoma, himself proving up land, and for a number of years thereafter divided his time between farming and teaching in the public schools.

    In 1900 Mr. Lewis entered the employ of Crowell Brothers, at Alva, with whom he thoroughly initiated himself into the mysteries of the grain and lumber business, and in 1904 was sent by his employers to Dacoma, to open a branch lumber yard, this city (Dacoma) having since been his home.

    In 1908 was established the Dacoma Grain Company, which, i 1914, handled almost 1,000,000 bushels of wheat, the officers of this large concern being: George W. Crowell, president; George Weaber, secretary, and Albert W. Lewis, manager and treasurer.

    The Dacoma Lumber Company was organized in 1913, with main office at Dacoma and Branch yard at Hopeton, Oklahoma, the officers of this enterprise being the same as those of the Dacoma Grain Company. Mr. Lewis was recognized as an energetic, capable business man of shrewd foresight and excellent judgment. His management of the interests of the large firms which he resented had been progressive and efficient and his associates had every reason to place the utmost confidence in him. While his business interest have been heavy, entailing constant attention and heavy responsibility, he had found time to aid in civic government, and for eight years had served capably as mayor of Dacoma. He was a warm friend and supporter of education, and during twenty years had been a member of school boards at various places in Oklahoma.

    Fraternally, Mr. Lewis was a Royal Arch Mason and a member of the Odd Fellows. He and the members of his family belonged to the United Brethren Church.

    On 9 October 1888, at Englewood, Kansas, Mr. Lewis was married to Miss Mary B. Kees, who was born September 17, 1870, in Ohio, daughter of A. W. Kees, of Gate, Oklahoma. At the time of their marriage, the young couple were living in "No Man's Land," where there were no courts of record, nor clergy, and Mr. Lewis and his bride went to Englewood, Kansas, to have the ceremony officially and legally solemnized. They were the parents of four children: William R., born August 23, 1890, married December 25, 1910, Miss Josie B. Frye, born in Iowa, July 17, 1890, and they had two children - Albert William, born August 28, 1912, and Audrie, born January 20, 1915; Nettie, born December 8, 1892, married in 1911 W. F. Hiatt, and had two children - Eldora and Walter; Erdice, born February 25, 1894, died May 25, 1910; and Miss Alta Maud, born September 9, 1898, lived with her parents. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Marjorie Caroline Lisk Hayward Obituary

    Vol 14, Iss 18 Woods County, Oklahoma - VIEW/SEND CONDOLENCES -- We lost another Northwest Oklahoma pioneer today when Marjorie Caroline Lisk Hayward died 23 April 2012, at Bartlesville, Oklahoma. Her graveside services were held at 2:00 p.m. Monday, April 30, 2012, at the Alva Municipal Cemetery with Rev. Joshua Leu officiating. Interment was under the direction of Marshall Funeral Home.

    Marjorie Caroline Lisk was the daughter of the late Guy Metcalf and Reba (Carrico) Lisk, born October 22, 1907, at Alva, Oklahoma, and passed away April 23, 2012, at Bartlesville, Oklahoma, at the age of 104 years, 6 months, and 1 day.

    On June 1, 1926, she was united in marriage to John Noel "Jack" Hayward. They made their home in Alva. To this union three children were born, Patricia Ann, Virginia Sue, and Jerry Lisk.

    Marjorie was passionate about the Runnymede Hotel restoration project, making many contributions. She was a lover of antiques, she enjoyed collecting and displaying her vast collections in her home. A distinguished artist in her own right, she and her husband, artist J. N. Hayward, enhanced their artistic talents through their travels.


    Besides her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, Jack; one son, Jerry; two daughters, Patricia, and Virginia Brandenburg; and two brothers, James and Robert Lisk. Marjorie is survived by three granddaughters, Linda Sue Brandenburg of Savannah, Georgia, Jennifer Brandenburg Leu and husband, Sam, of Bartlesville, and Carrie Hayward Helms and husband, Dennis, of Warner Robins, Georgia; four great grandchildren; six great great grandchildren; a special niece, Cynthia DePrado and her husband, Tony; other relatives and friends.

    Memorial contributions may be made through the funeral home to the Nescatunga Arts and Humanities Council or the Runnymede Hotel. View/Write Comments (count 2)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    GWIN / GWINNE / GWYN / GWYNNE

    Vol 13, Iss 13 Ireland - We did a search for GWIN / GWINNE / GWYNN / GWYN / GWYNNE in the book, Dictionary of National Biography, Vol. 23, pages 399 thru 403. We find the following on Google Books. Go to Google Books; search for Dictionary of National Biography along with your surnames and see if you can find a possible ancestor's history.

    GWIN, Robert (fl. 1591), pg. 399. I do not know if any of these GWIN's are related to my GWIN's. I am still searching for a connection.

    GWIN, Robert (fl. 1591), a catholic divine, a native of the diocese of Bangor in Wales, received his education at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, where he was admitted to the degree of B.A. on 9 July 1568 (Oxf. Univ. Reg., Oxf. Hist. Soc., i. 271). In 1573 he went to the English College at Douay and studied divinity. He was ordained priest in 1575, and sent back to this country on the mission on 16 Jan. 1575-6, having just before that date taken the degree of B.D. in the university of Douay. He lived chiefly in Wales, and was much esteemed for his talent in preaching.

    By an instrument dated 24 May 1578 Pope Gregory XIII granted him a license to bless portable altars, because at that time there were in England only two catholic bishops, both of whom were in prison, namely, an Irish archbishop and Dr. Watson, bishop of Lincoln.

    Gwin, who appears to have been alive in 1591, wrote several pious works in the Welsh language, according to Antonio Possevino, who, however, omits to give their titles, and he also translated from English into Welsh A Christian Directory or Exercise Guiding Men to Eternal Salvation, commonly called The Resolution, written by Robert Parsons, the jesuit, "which translation," says Wood, "was much used and valued, and so consequently did a great deal of good among the Welsh people."

    GWINNE, Matthew, M.D. (1558?-1627)

    GWINNE, Matthew, M.D. (1558?-1627), pg. 399, physician, of Welsh descent, son of Edward Gwinne, grocer, was born in London. On 28 April 1570, he was entered at Merchant Taylors' School (Robinson, Reg. Merchant Taylors' School, p. 14). He was elected to a scholarship at St. John's College, Oxford, in 1574, and afterwards became a fellow of that foundation. He proceeded B.A. 14 May 1578, and M.A. 4 May 1582 (Reg. Univ. Oxf., Oxf. Hist. Soc., II. iii. 75).

    Queen Elizabeth visited Oxford in September 1592, and he took part as replier in moral philosophy in an academic disputation held for her amusement, and at the same time was appointed to oversee and provide for the playes in Christ Church (ib. II. ii. 229, 230). He took the degree of M.B. 17 July 1593, and was the same day created M.D., on the recommendation of Lord Buckhurst, chancellor of the university, and in consideration of the fact that he had been engaged in the study of medicine, which then required no more than the reading of medical books for ten years.One of his questions on this occasion was whether the frequent use of tobacco was beneficial (ib. II. i. 127, 150, 190).

    In 1595 he went to France in attendance on Sir Henry Unton, the ambassador. When Gresham College was founded in London, Gwinne was nominated by the university of Oxford on 14 Feb. 1597 the first professor of physic (ib. II. i. 233), and began to lecture in Michaelmas term 1598.

    He was admitted a licentiate of the College of Physicians of London 30 Sept. 1600, and a fellow 22 Dec. 1605. He was six times censor, and twice held the office of registrar. In 1605 he was given the appointment of physician to the Tower. When in 1605 James I and Queen Anne visited Oxford, Gwinne disputed on physic with Sir William Paddy for the royal entertainment. The physicians selected for discussion, as likely to be interesting to a royal mother and a royal father, the questions whether the morals of nurses are imbibed by infants with their milk, and whether smoking tobacco is wholesome.

    Gwinne resigned his Gresham professorship in 1607, and attained large professional practice. In 1611 was published his only medical work, entitled In assertorem Chymicae seed verse medicine desertorem Fr. Antonium Matthaei Gwynn Philiatri &c. succinct adversary, and dedicated to James I. [See Anthony, Francis].

    Gwinne proves that Anthony's aurum potable, as it was called, contained no gold, and that if it had, the virtues of gold as a medicine in no way corresponded to its value as a metal, and were few, if any.

    In 1620 Gwinne was appointed commissioner for inspecting tobacco. He was friendly with the chief literary men of the day, and was especially intimate with John Florio [q.v.], to whose works he contributed several commendatory sonnets under the pseudonym of Il Candido. Gwinne lived in the parish of St. Mary Magdalen, Old Fish Street, London, and there died in October 1627.

    GWINNET, Richard (d. 1717)

    GWINNET, Richard (d. 1717), pg. 400, dramatist, son of George Gwinnet of Shurdington, Gloucestershire, was a pupil of Francis Gastrell [q.v.] at Christ Church, Oxford. He remained there some seven years. When he proceeded to London, and took rooms in the Temple, although he was in no way connected with the legal profession. While in London he became engaged to Elizabeth Thomas [q.v.], well known as Dryden's 'Corinna,' but owing to his consumptive tendencies the marriage was postponed, and he withdrew to his father's residence Gloucstershire. During the next sixteen years (1700-16) much correspondence passed between them, Mrs. Thomas writing as "Cornna," Gwinnet as "Pylades."

    Their letters were subsequently published in two volumes entitled Pylades and Corrinna or memoirs of the lives, amours, and writings of R. G. (Richard Gwinnet) and Mrs. E. Thomas, Jr. . . . containing the letters and other miscellaneous pieces in prose and verse, which passed between them during a Courtship of above sixteen years . . . Published from their original manuscripts (by Philalethes) . . . To which is prefixed the life of Corinna, written by herself.

    In 1716, on the death of his father, Richard Gwinnet returned to London to press his suit, but the wedding was again deferred owing to the illness of the lady's mother. Early in the following Spring Gwinnet suffered a relapse, and died on 16 April 1717.

    GWYN,David (fl. 1588)

    GWYN, David (fl. 1588), pg. 401, poet, suffered a long and cruel imprisonment in Spain (Cal. State papers, Dom. 1581-90, p. 220). Upon regaining his livery, he published a poetical narrative of his sufferings, entitled Certaine English Verses penned by David Gwyn, who for the space of eleven years and ten Months was in most grievous Servitude in the Gallies, under the King of Spaine, 16mo, London, 1588.

    In this tract, consisting of eleven pages, are three poems presented by the author to Queen Elizabeth in St. James's Park on Sunday, 18 Aug. 1588 (Arber, Stationers' Registers, ii. 232). Only one copy is at present known; it fetched 20l. 15s. at the sale of Thomas Jolley's library in 1843-4. [Lowndes's Bibl. Manual (Bohn), ii. 962.]

    GWYN, Eleanor "Nell"

    GWYN, Eleanor (1650-1687), pg 401, actress and mistress to Charles II, was born, according to a horoscope preserved among the Ashmole papers in the museum at Oxford, and reproduced in Cunningham's Story of Nell Gwyn, on 2 Feb. 1650. Historians of Hereford accept the tradition that she was born in a house in Pipe Well Lane, Hereford, since called Gwyn Street. This account is said to be confirmed by a slab in the cathedral, of which James Beauclerk, her descendant, was bishop from 1746 to 1787.

    A second account, resting principally on the not very trustworthy information supplied by Oldys in Betterton's History of the Stage(Curll, 1741) and in manuscript notes still existing, assigns her birth to Coal Yard, Drury Lane.

    In the second, third, fourth, fifth, and sixth series of "notes and Queries' will be found full discussions of the question whether her father, who is aid to have been called James, was a dilapidated soldier or a fruiterer in Drury Lane, and of other points. Her mother Helena (?Eleanor), according to the 'Domestic Intelligencer' of 5 Aug. 1679 and the 'English Intelligencer' of 2 Aug. 1679, 'sitting near the waterside at her house by the Neat Houses at Chelsea (Millbank), fell into the water accidentally and was drowned.' Mrs. Gwyn was buried in the church of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, in a tomb subsequently shared by her daughter.

    Nell's first public occupation was that of a vendor in the Theatre Royal of oranges, or, according to a satire of Rochester, of herrings. Charles Hart and John Lacy the players and a certain Robert Duncan, Dungan, or Dongan, have been reckoned among her lovers. To Hart she owed her theatrical training; Dungan is said to have promoted her format he place in the pit assigned during the Restoration to the orange-women to the stage of the Theatre Royal. [See images for more information on Eleanor "Nell" GWYN>]

    GWYN, Francis (1648?-1734)

    GWYN, Francis (1648?-1734), pg 403 politician, son and heir of Edward Gwyn of Llansannor, Glamorganshire, who married Eleanor, youngest daughter of Sir Francis Popham of Littlecott, Wiltshire, was born at Combe Florey in Somersetshire about 1648. Francis Gwyn was trained for the profession of the law, but being possessed of ample means soon showed a preference for politics. On a by-election in February 1673 he was returned for Chippenham. After the dissolution in January 1679 he remained outside the house discharging his official duties, but in 1685 was elected for Cardiff.

    In the Convention parliament of 1689-90 and in its successor from 1690 to 1695 he sat for Christchurch in Hampshire, and on the latter, if not on the first occasion, he was recommended by Henry, Earl of Clarendon. He represented Callington, Cornwall, from 1695 to 1698, and was elected for Totnes in 1699 and 1701.

    From 1701 till 1710 he represented Christchurch, and Totnes again from 1710 to 1715. Gwyn was a Tory, and lost his seat on the accession of George I until March 1717 he was re-elected for Christchurch. At the general election in 1722 he was returned for both Christchurch and Wells, when he chose Wells, and at the dissolution in 1727 he retired from parliamentary life. In return for the sum of 2,500l. Sir Robert Southwell vacated for Gwyn the post of clerk of the council, and he was sworn in on 5 Dec. 1679, holding the office until January 1685. Until the death of Charles II he was a groom of the bedchamber, and he was twice under-secretary of state, from February 1681 to January 1683, under his cousin, Edward, earl of Conway, and from the Christmas 1688 to Michaelmas 1689. The minutes of the business which he transacted during these periods of office were sold with the effects of Ford Abbey in 1846.

    When Lord Rochester was lord high treasurer under James II, Gwyn was joint secretary to the Treasury with Henry Guy [q.v.], and when Rochester was made lord-lieutenant, of Ireland in 1701 Gwyn was his chief secretary, and a privy councillor. He accompanied James on his expedition to the west in November 1688 and his diary of the journey was printed by Mr. C. T. Gatty in the Fortnightly Review, xlvi, 358-64 (1886).

    When the House of Lords met at the Guildhall, London, in December 1688, he acted as their secretary, and kept a journal of the proceedings, which has not yet been printed. At one time he served as a commissioner of public accounts. From June 1711 to August 1713 he was a commissioner of the board of trade, and he was then secretary at war until 24 Sept. 1714, when he received a letter of dismissal from Lord Townshend. He was recorder of Totnes and steward of Brecknock. He died at Ford Abbey on 2 June 1734, aged 86, being buried in its chapel.

    In 1690 Gwyn married his cousin Margaret, third daughter of Edmund Prideaux, by his wife Amy Fraunceis, coheiress of John Fraunceis of Combe Florey, and granddaughter of Edmund Prideaux, attorney-general of Cornwall. They had four sons and three daughters, besides others who died young, and their issue is dully set out in the pedigree in Hutchins's History of Dorset.

    By this union Gwyn eventually became owner of the property of that branch of the Prideaux family, including Ford Abbey. This property passed format he family on the death of J. F. Gwyn in 1840, and there was an eight days' sale of the abbey's contents. The sale of the plate, some of which had belonged to Francis Gwyn, occupied almost the whole of the first day.

    The family portraits, collected by him and his father-in-law, were also sold. In the grand saloon was hung the splendid tapestry said to have been wrought at Arras, and given to Gwyn by Queen Anne, depicting the cartoons of Raphael, for which Catharine of Russia, through Count Orloff, offered 30,000l., and this was sold to the new proprietor for 2,200l.

    One room at Ford Abbey is called 'Queen Anne's,' for whom it was fitted up when its owner was secretary at war; and the walls were adorned with tapestry representing a Welsh wedding; the furniture and tapestry were also purchased for preservation with the house. Several letters by Gwyn dated 1686 and 1687, one of which was written when he was setting out with Lord Rochester and James Kendall on a visit to Spa, are printed in the 'Ellis Correspondence' (ed. by Lord Dover), i. 170-171, 202-3, 253-4, 314-15. In 'Notes and Queries,' 2nd seer. xii. 44 (1861), is inserted a letter from him to Harley, introducing Narcissus Luttrell the diarist, and many other communications to and from him are referred to in the Historical MSS. Commission's reports. The constancy of his friendship with Rochester was so notorious that in the 'Wentworth Papers,' p. 163, occurs the sentence 'Frank Gwin, Lord Rochester's gwine as they call him.'

    [Luttrell's Relation of State Affairs, i. 27, 325, iv. 74, 370, 718, v. 73, vi. 674; Diary of Henry, Earl Clarendon, ed. Singer, ii. 305; Pulman's Book of Axe, pp. 422, 428; M. A[llen]'s Ford Abbey, pp. 66-98; Hutchins's Dorset, ed. 1873, iv. 527-9; Gent. Mag. 1846, pt. ii. 625-6; Oldfield's Parl. History,iv. 427-8, v. 160; Hist. MSS. Comm. 6th Rep. App. pp. 736-8, 7th Rep. App. passim.]

    >GWYNN / GWYN / GWYNNE, John (d. 1786)

    GWYNN / GWYN / GWYNNE, John (d. 1786), [Dictionary of National biography, Vol. 23, pg 405], architect, was born 'of a respectable family' in Shrewsbury, probably in the parish of St. Chad's, but the year of his birth is not known. He is said to have left his native town in early childhood. He does not seem to have been educated as an architect. In 1760 he was described as 'till of late of another profession' (Observations on Bridge Building, p. 22). He became known in London as early as 1734, as a writer on art and a draughtsman.

    Gwynn died on or about 27 Feb. 1786 at Worcester, and was buried in the graveyard of ST. Oswald's Hospital. In his willdated 25 Feb. 1786, made when he was very ill, he mentioned a brother Richard Gwynn of Liverpool, and made provision for the maintenance and education of a natural son Cahrles. Failing him the money was to go to the Royal Society and the Royal Academy. Charles Gwynn died in 1795. Gwynn's works show him to have possessed considerable culture and a keen sense of beauty.

    Owen (in Chambers, Biog. Illustr. of Wrocester, p. 504) described him from personal recollection as 'lively, quick, and sarcastic, of quaint appearance and odd manners,' and Boswell called him 'a fine, lively, rattling fellow' (see account of his journey to Oxford with Johnson; Boswell, Life, p. 481). An excellent portrait of him was painted by Zoffany.

    GWYNNE, John (fl. 1660)

    GWYNNE, John (fl. 1660), captain, a Welshman, was the grandson of Edward Gwynne, barrister-at-law. He was a retainer in the household of Charles I, and was employed in training the royal family in military exercises. he rose to be a captain in the king's regiment of guards. During the civil war he seems to have distinguished himself by his personal courage and activity. After the king's execution he followed the fortunes of Charles II.

    GWYNNE was with Montrose in his last unhappy attempt in 1650, and joined the forces of General John Middleton in 1654. When that enterprise also failed he served James, duke of York, and wa with him at the fight before Dunkirk in 1658, and in Flanders. Upon the Restoration Gwynne seems to have been passed over and left to embarrassment, if not to want.

    GWYNNE accordingly drew up a statement of the battles, skirmishes, and adventures in which he had exhibited his loyalty. The manuscripts is a very neat one, and is preceded by several letters to persons of consequence whose interest the author was desirous of securing. Whether he proved successful or otherwise in his application is unknown. The manuscript was presented to Sir Walter Scott by the Rev. John Grahame of Lifford, near Strabane, Ireland, into whose hands it fell by accident. Scott published it as 'Military Memoirs of the Great Civil War. Being the Military Memoirs of John Gwynne.' &c., 4to, Edinburgh, 1822. [Scott's Preface to Military Memoirs; Cal. State Papers, Dom. 1660-1, p. 443.]

    GWYNNTETH, John, (fl. 1557)

    GWYNNTETH, John, (fl. 1557), pg. 407, catholic divine and musician, was son of David, ap Llewelyn ap Ithel of Llyn, brother to Robert ap llewelyn ap Ithel of Castelmarch, Carnarvonshire, ancestor of Sir William Jones, knight. He was educated at Oxford, and being a poor man he was says Wood, 'exhibited to by an ecclesiastical Mecasenas,' in the hope that he would write against the heretics. In due course he was ordained priest, and on 9 Dec. 1531 he supplicated the university for leave to practise in music and for the dredge of doctor of music, as he had composed all the responses for a whole year 'in cantos chrispis aut fractis, ut aiunt,' and many masses, including three masses of five parts and five masses of four parts, besides hymns, antiphons, and divers songs for the use of the church (Oxf. Univ. Reg., Oxf. Hist. Soc., i. 167). This request was granted conditionally on his paying to the university twenty pence on the day of his admission, and he was forthwith licensed to proceed. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Alva Public Library - Genealogy Section

    Vol 5, Iss 10 "Something you want to look at when you are in Alva (Oklahoma) if you haven't seen them before at the library in the genealogy section there are about 10-12 Volumes of books about Alva and the surrounding area residents or former residents.

    Someone had a very time-consuming project - they took archived newspapers (from the Alva area and any other state/city they found any articles in from around the country) and cut out the articles relevant to Alva residents or who formerly lived in the Alva area, etc... (and surrounding towns too). I found poems written by Rose NICOLA on umpteen pages of this one book and it was a compilation of her poems written weekly for the local newspaper - for over 3 years!

    They were all grouped together - which I thought was really neat!

    I found obits from California and other states about (former) residents, etc.! ANYWAY, I don't remember what the title of the volumes are called but they're divided into the volumes and then topic matter (e.g. weddings, deaths, activities, etc.) and indexed! In the instance of the weddings announcements I told you about .... there were 3 articles cut out of a newspaper and then all 3 were Xerox on this one page - (pg. 342) of the Weddings Feb. 1942 section. That page happened to have my mother and dad's wedding announcement - and it also included the Meskimen - Welty marriage from the Freedom paper (I assume ... since someone has handwritten 'Freedom' just above the article) and then hand written a date - which I presume is the date it was published in that particular newspaper. Here are the 2 wedding announcements transcribed as they are on the page:

    Meskimen-Welty (handwritten above article - Freedom 2-16-42) -- A marriage of much interest to their many friends was that of Mrs. Ruby Meskimen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Wilson, and Ellsworth Welty, son of Mr. and Mrs. Nove Welty, which was solemnized at Coldwater, Kansas, Sunday, with Judge M. M. Cosby officiating. The bride wore a street length dress of blue, with black accessories. Pete Welty, brother of the groom, and Miss Grace Keon of Woodward were the only attendants. Mr. and Mrs. Welty, who will make their home on the Ruby Eden ranch, east of town, have many friends here who extend congratulations to the happy couple.

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    1920 Powwow Senior Class Legacy

    Vol 18, Iss 21 It was on a September day in 1916, when we, the Class of '20, first made our debut in Alva High. We were then situated in the City Hall and the next year at the beginning of the second semester we moved into the new building.

    During the Freshman year we realized the accumulation of events, good and bad, of which we had never thought or dreamed. We resented the fact that we were the easiest mark for ridicule and every action was greeted with a sneer from the upper classmen.

    Though our hopes often fell, we felt that the year had been a successful one. Our class president was Donald Gordon.
    The next year we had the pleasure of teasing the freshest in school as we had been. We were often reprimanded for fooling and were wisely advised to get an idea once in a while. In spite of these things, however, we still remained the jolly Sophomores. We elected Donald Keller as president, Miss Hahn as class mother, who has wisely piloted us through our Junior and Senior years. Mr. Mogg was our class father, but we had the misfortune of losing him when he was called to the colors and we chose Mr. Calmes who ably filled the vacancy.

    We greatly desired to become Juniors. That was the year in which we displayed our pep more than ever before and were quite unlike the complaining Freshman. Each member of the class was enthusiastic in all the work and activities. Donovan Poorman was the splendid class President and as we needed a class father to assist Miss Hahn in taking care of us, we unanimously elected the youthful Mr. Bartlett whom we have kept in the Senior year also.

    We became eager aspirants to have annexed to our names, '20. At the beginning of the Senior year there was no decline in our enthusiasm, and when the class was organized, we wanted a very brilliant president, so Homer Anderson was chosen.

    All through High School we have taken part in many games, parties, picnics, and wiener roasts in which we had good times that are never to be forgotten. There is much talent in our class and we have always been largely represented in the different organizations.

    The classmates who spent their entire four years in Alva High are: Inez Allman, Inez Anderson, Lois Beattie, Joe Bell, Gladys Burnham, Lila Cox, Earl Heaton, Ralph Hellman, Ruth Kerr, Vera Kendall, Florence Kranz, Lionel Long, Charles Maxwell, Meade McClure, Ernest Miller, Mildred Smith, Francis Strickland, Brette Tanner, Maude Wyckoff, Wildia Wyckoff and Brynie Kern.

    This has been the best year of all and it has meant so much to each of us. Lasting friendships have been formed and memories of those happy school days will often be recalled in the years to come.

    We shall ever think kindly of the teachers who helped us so faithfully to reach our goal. We shall always remember our class sponsors, Mr. Bartlett and Miss Hahn, who took so much interest in our behalf. And with the trure spirit of the class of '20 embodied herein, we sincerely hope that the ripened harvest of our four years' work will serve as the golden afterglow of a dying sun wherein memory tipped clouds of youth will flit to and fro before at last our spirits send forth their last ray of life.

    written by -- F. K.

    Summary of Seniors

    Homer Anderson, President
    Doris Anderson, Reporter
    Floyd Ames, Vice-President
    Earl Heaton, yell leader
    Lois Beattie, Secretary
    mabel Albright
    Gladys Burnham
    Inez Allman
    Inez Anderson
    Joe Bell
    Byrnie Kern
    Clifford Bryan
    Gace Douglas
    Nellie Counts
    Sylvia Cellan
    Lila Cox
    Roscoe Elliot
    Juanita Jacobs
    Viola Gwinup
    Fufus Gordon
    Ralph Hellman
    Ruth Kerr
    Vera Kendall
    Florence Kranz
    Donald Keller
    Lionel Long
    Meade McClure
    Lilah McKinnon
    Ernest Miller
    Rosa Mantz
    Charles Maxwell
    Mildred Smith
    Grace Prichard
    Arthur Robinson
    Belle Jane Rackley
    Francis Strickland
    Ida Williams
    Everett Veatch
    Brette Tanner
    Grace Wheelock
    Wildia Wyckoff
    Maude Wyckoff
    Senior Class Prophecy
    The following are some extracts taken from a diary of an alumnae of Alva High:

    February 20, 1930
    As I was sitting by my fireside thinking of the olden days when I was in high school at Alta, I was startled from my reveries by a loud peal of the door bell. The maid ushered into my presence three persons, in whom I recognized Grace Douglas, Lila McKinnon and Ida Williams. We had a delightful chat about the 1920 class. From them I gleaned the fact that they were members of a vaudeville troupe, The Glendale Girls. They told me that Joe Bell of the 1920 class in old AHS was admitted to the bar, January 1st, and was fast becoming famous throughout the country as a criminal lawyer. When the Glendale Girls were in Kansas City, they saw and heard much of the members of the 1920 class. One evening while they were walking down Grand Avenue they saw the huge electric sign, "Lionel Long, the Avenue Tailor." After entering the magnificent building they found that it was erected by Francis Strickland, one of Kansas City's prominent business men.

    They told me that Rosa Mantz is classed as one of the world's best stenographers, due to the many hours she spent listening to Prof. Barlett discourse along the road of higher learning in shorthand.

    Inez Anderson and Vera Kendall are running a chic little beauty parlor in Wichita. It is patronized by all the people of the higher class.
    We finally ended our afternoon over a cup of tea and when the girls departed I found myself the proud possessor of two tickets to the theater in which the Glendale Girls were playing.

    February 25, 1930...
    I just received a long letter from our old friend, Doris Anderson. She is private secretary to the senior partner of the well known Chicago law firm of Veatch, Miller and Kern. In the name of this firm we recognize Everett Veatch, Ernest Miller and Byrnie Kern.

    Doris refers to her "little brother," Homer, as being a rising surgeon in New York City. As yet he is still single.
    Floyd Ames owns a large ranch in New Mexico. It is there he has been spending his time since he graduated from high school. Inez Allman is at the head of the foreigh language department in Alva High.

    Grace Wheelock is a leader of the most secluded circles of New York society, having captured a young millionaire. Her staunch friend, Lois Beattie, has developed a taste of the stage and is moving large audiences by the wonderful qualities of her voice. Very lately the Victor people have induced her to make records for them.

    Mabel Albright has long since settled down to a quiet life, on a farm near Capron.

    March 10, 1930...
    I just returned from a visit in Alva. While there I learned much of our friends of 1920.

    Brette Tanner has, for the past five years, been the successor to Benny Owen as athletic coach in the University of Oklahoma. He seems to be enjoying his work very much.

    Wildia Wyckoff is following Lyceum work and is very successful.
    Earl Heaton and Ralph Hellman are both prosperous farmers. Roscoe Elliot is responding to the call of the Gospel and is a minister who has won many converts in the past two years.

    Mildred Smith is an instructor in the Oklahoma City High School, and she is also coaching girls' basketball in that place.

    While in Alva I attended a show at the Liberty Theatre. I was somewhat surprised to see the name of Florence Kranz flashed on the screen as heroine of the picture. Later I found that she had been in the movies for several years.

    Gladys Burnham is teaching Domestic Science in Guthrie High School. Grace Prichard has secured the position of primary teacher in the Alva Schools.
    Meade McClure is an oil king in the Oklahoma oil wells.

    March 20, 1930
    When visiting friends in Tulsa I found that Juanita Jacobs was a housewife in that city. She told me that Arthur Robinson was mining gold in California. Clifford Bryan has a fruit ranch in Oregon.

    Donald Keller is a section hand on the railroad just out of Tulsa.

    Viola Gwinup, Sylvia Cellan and Nellie Counts have been touring Europe to gather material for a book which is to be called "After the War." I am told that the book is nearing completion.

    Charles Maxwell is the editor of the Kansas City Star and Times. Belle Jane Rackley is society reporter for the Daily Oklahoman. Lila Cox is an instructor in the Gem City Business College. Maude Wyckoff is a contented hoursewife in the southern part of Oklahoma.

    Ruth Kerr is a missionary in foreign fields. At present she is in China. Miss Hahn is still teaching history in Alva High School. Mr. Barlett has a chicken ranch near Brink and from all reports it is a paying business.

    Senior Class Will
    We, the members of the Senior Class of 1920, being of sound body and sane judgment, and realizing that this is probably our last will and testament do herein bequeath unto the underclassmen all those qualities for which we now have no further use. And we do dispense with these possessions in the manner herein stated: We do give, devise and bequeath Homer Anderson's place as President of the class to Ralph Surface and His popularity with the girls to Mike Bouziden.

    Brette Tanner's love for athletics and out-door life to Stanley William May.

    Inez Allman's love for Floyd Ames to Greta Wilkinson.

    Grace Wheelock's giggle to Alma Oringderff.

    Doris Anderson's chattering propensities to Mary Huff.

    Mable Albright's popularity among the boys to Mary Mondy.

    Athur Robinson's never-failing "A" credits to Evertte Weinrich.

    Byrnie Kern's sober and steadfast disposition to that frivolous individual Fred Green.

    Lionel Lon's owlish tendencies and intellectual abilities to Mildred McKritick.

    Roscoe Elliot's sentimentality and emotional qualities to Eddie Hamilton Brooks.

    Rosa Mantz's corkscrew curls to Lillie Fisher.

    Maude Wyckoff's steady and reliable nature to Hazel Rackley.

    Donald Keller's Monday morning excuse to Stella Bloominger.

    Inez Andrson's quiet disposition and air of refinement to Gladys Channel.

    Vera Kendall's and Wildia Wyckoff's delicate appetites to Horace Beegle.

    Foyd Ames' argumentative power and stick-to-it-iveeness to George Miller.

    Viola Gwinup's love for Latin and "Homer" to Gladys Rice.

    Belle Jane Rackley's disgust for the "gum-chewing" pastime to Leonard Morris.

    Florence Kranz' sweet smile and string of beads to Miss Vorhies.

    Ernest Miller's earnestness to Phil Noah.

    Lois Beattie's blush to Irene Shelly.

    Ruth Kerr's gentle voice to Baron Jones.

    Juanita Jacobs' surplus conscientiousness to Weneva Fanning.

    Clifford Bryan's heart to Miss McDaniels.

    Mildred Smith's right to select a new sweetheart with the change of the moon to Reba Emberson.

    Charles Maxwell's oration on "Girls" to Amos Schaefer.

    Joe Bell's dancing slippers to Mr. Fanning.

    Francis Strickland's book on "Heart Breaking" to Hal McClain.

    Ida Williams' place on th basketball team to Floris Patterson.

    Grace Douglas' recipe for "modesty' to Pauline Thompson.

    Meade McClure's smile to Percy Robinson.

    Lila McKinnon and Everett Veatch's spooning bench to Monford Mills and Verna Lee.

    Earl Heaton's notes on love to Bruce Kirk.

    Gladys Burnham's freckles to Ruth Vetter.

    Ralph Hellman's dancing ability to Edyth Stowe.

    Grace Prichard's lisp to Fred Green.

    Nellie Count's bashfulness to Georgia Howard.Sylvia Cellan's gracful walk to Andrew pennington.

    Lila Cox's typewriting speed to Leonard Morris.

    Nathan Thomas Bartlett's dainty walk and baby ways to William Harry Webb.

    Finn Hahn's diamond ring and chance of marriage to Stella P. Earnest.

    We do set our will and testament hereto and do nominate our beloved class mother and father, Miss Finn Hahn and Mr. Nathan Bartlett, to be guardians of our worthy emulators, the Freshies of '21. In witness hereof we have set our hand and seal this first (1st) day of April, A. D., One Thousand, Nine Hundred and Twenty.
    Senior Class

    (Signed, Sealed, Published and Declared)
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    Looking for Ione Hada's Father

    Vol 5, Iss 17 Alva, Oklahoma - "My husband is always interested in old Alva history. He collects old advertising from Alva Businesses and all the old Northwestern Castle on the Hill items he can find. Your archives have been a great source of information to us. We now live in the house across from your parents old home on Skyline. Have great week.

    Do you have any ideas to help our family search? My grandma Ione Hada's father disappeared without word leaving the family (wife and 7 children). Nothing was ever heard of him after they picked up his car in Hardtner, Kansas. Info I have: Name: Oren Hinman LITTLE; Sex: M; Birth: 18 MAY 1888 in Chapin, Franklin County, IA; Note: Has also been found as born in Hampton, IA. Father: Linter Alvin LITTLE b: 11 JAN 1855 in Cherry Valley, Ashtabula County, OH; Mother: Rosetta Elther HINMAN b: 29 SEP 1860 in Cottage Grove, Ramsey County, WI; Marriage: 1 Leona MERKLIN b: 1891 in Cass County, MI, Married: 18 AUG 1912 in Kiowa, Barber County, KS.

    Grandma said he left home (near yellowstone) in 1933 when she was 13. Uncle Dwight Little (his son) drove to Hardtner to pick up his car at the railroad station. Later someone got word to them that the car was there. Oren is listed in the 1920 census in Yellowstone. I don't find him on the 1930 census, but not all states are on line yet. I would think it would be worthwhile to check to see if he is on the 1940 census somewhere.

    Grandma Ione said they could never find that he got a social security number. But it wasn't required until 1935 or after he left. He is not listed on the SS Death list to date. I wondered if we could find a marriage certificate for another marriage at a later date. How about a drivers license archives search?

    I forgot to add that someone thought he was running a feedstore in Red Cloud, Nebraska. My dad said that Walter Adams of northwest woods county onece started to tell him something about Oren but his wife elma Adams walked by at the time and he stopped mid-sentence and never would say anything about it again. Is there some National Graves Registration we could research? Thanks for any ideas!" -- Dixie - Email: nursedix2@yahoo.com View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Wiley H. Cowan Obituary by Tom Dyer

    Vol 12, Iss 21 Oklahoma - Another obituary penned by Tom Dyer. Opal Nighswonger is listed as one of Wiley's daughters and was the principal at Longfellow School in Alva during 1947-1951. Thanks to Joy Sherman for sharing these Tom Dyer writings with the Okie Legacy.

    Wiley H. Cowan -- On Monday morning, November 11, 1935, the news was broadcast throughout our city and county that another of the old-time pioneers had answered the last roll call, and that great reveille had tolled for our old time friend, Wiley Cowan.

    Perhaps it would be more fitting to say that he was a pioneer of pioneers having spent the major portion of his long life on the early frontier of what was called the Great American Desert. He was born in the state of Illinois in October, 1847.

    At the age of 15 years he left the parental home to seek adventure in the west. His first venture was from Westport Landing near Kansas City, where he engaged himself as a teamster to drive an ox team in one of those overland freighters caravans over the old Santa Fe Trail to Santa Fe, New Mexico.

    This was in the year 1863, more than 72 years ago. While on a visit to his eldest daughter, Mrs. Hazel Wiebner (sic), and husband, Fred Wiebner (sic), who at that time were living near Springer, N. M., Wiley located the place where the old trail had been over which he had traveled more than a half century before.

    After his experience as a teamster and freighter, Wiley Cowan chose the life of a cowboy, and in the following year made five trips from Texas, across the wild wastes of the Indian Territory to the wide expanse of Kansas prairies, and the markets of Kansas towns. Two of the trips were with herds of cattle and three were made with herds of horses. At this time he was in the employ of a man named Col. Leroy M. T. Pope, who by the way was the grandfather of one of our genial fellow-townsmen, Roy Day, manager for the Kavannaugh (sic) and Shea hardware company.

    This man Pope was an old trail driver who followed the business for years, and who also owned a ranch in Sedgwick County, Kansas on the Ninnescah and Cowskin near Mount Hope. It has been suggested to me that it was at this ranch where Wiley first met the girl who in later years became his wife and companion.

    About the year 1874 he came to Old Kiowa in Barber County to engage in the cattle business. These were perilous days in that part of the country, Indians were on the warpath, stockades were being built at old Kiowa and Medicine Lodge to protect the white settlers who had come to Barber County to find homes. He had associated with him the late Clark Bunton, with whom he had worked on ranch and trail, sharing each others trials and hardships, they became life-long friends.

    Wiley Cowan, the cowboy, none better I'll own,
    Astride a cayuse, has ever been known,
    He started out in his youthful years,
    To follow the droves of long-horn steers,
    In the early spring when the grass was green,
    From San Antonio up to Abilene,
    Across rivers, mountains, through woodland and vale,
    He traversed the famous old Chisholm Trail,
    And many times, on his trusted steed,
    He pointed the herd in a wild stampede.

    On December 22, 1882, he was united in marriage to Manda Day near Anthony, Kansas. It was a happy union of congenial lives. Life took on a more serious side as the problems of life confronted them. Five children came to bless this union, three of whom are still living: John Cowan, of Buffalo, Okla., and Mrs. Hazel Wiebner (sic) and Mrs. Opal Nighswonger of Alva, Oklahoma.

    After their marriage they followed the vocations of ranch life in the year 1883. The Salt Fork and Eagle Chief pool was organized, its personnel was composed of the following members: D. R. Streeter, M. J. Lane, Frank Shelly, Billy Powell, Charles Moore, A. W. Rumsey, Charles Stowell, Major Moderwell, D. Donovan, Wiley Cowan, Clark Bunton, Henry Wick and Frank Stacy. Wiley Cowan was chosen as foreman of the organization. He remained in the cattle business until the Cherokee Strip Livestock Association was disbanded, and the cowmen were driven out of the Cherokee Outlet.

    At the opening of the Outlet to settlement in 1893, Wiley Cowan secured a fine homestead in the Ashley community where the family resided for something like 12 years. Here he organized the first Sunday school in that neighborhood, and was chosen as its superintendent, assisted by his good wife as co-worker in this laudable undertaking. It is related that not all of the adult population attended the school at first, but the children (God bless them) they were there, and going home gave such glowing accounts of the Sunday school that the parents were induced to go.

    It became known far and wide as the most earnest organization of its kind. It was a union Sunday school. Wiley Cowan's philosophy of life was to do good, his creed, the Golden Rule. Whatsoever ye would that others should do unto you, do ye even so to them. This was exemplified in his everyday life, as many of his old time neighbors and associates will gladly tell you when they recall the many kindly acts and liberal generosity of their old time friend, Wiley Cowan.

    Selling the old homestead, he bought land and established a ranch near Buffalo and Selman in Harper County, Oklahoma, and which they still own. Bereft of his wife and loving companion on February 24, 1924, he divided his time among his children. In the early part of 1927, he was stricken with paralysis at his ranch near Buffalo, at the home of his son, John Cowan. The malady did not readily respond to any treatment, later he was brought to the home of his daughter, Mrs. Opal Nighswonger, at Alva. Here he spent the remainder of his life a helpless invalid until an all-wise heavenly father released him and said, "â??Tis enough, come up higher." His age, 88 years and 14 days.

    Eighteen years beyond the allotted span
    The Lord accorded to mortal man
    He lived, his later years so weak and frail,
    Ere he reached the end of the long, long trail.
    â??Twas in the early dawn, a fitting time,
    To leave this earth to a happier clime,
    When the angels came and wafted away
    His imprisoned spirit from its home of clay,
    The realms of that eternal day.

    With many of his old friends and neighbors, I attended the last rites to pay a tribute to the respect to our departed friend who was beloved by all who knew him best. At the Maughlin and Howerton funeral parlor where it was held, the casket was banked with many beautiful wreaths of flowers, his inanimate form reposing among them as if only asleep. A fitting eulogy was given by Rev. Phil Deschner, pastor of the First Methodist Church, while the music by the ladies quartet was beautiful and appropriate.

    Six of his grandsons were the pall bearers, a splendid tribute by these young men to their grandfather. Their names, Orville Wiebener, Anadarko, Okla., Paul Wiebener, Alva, John Nighswonger, Alva, Hal Cowan, Woodward, Burt Wenel, Hardtner, Kan., Bob Selman, Woodward. There was one grandson, J. Wiley Cowan whose home is in Glendale, Calif., who could not be present at his grandfather's funeral. His remains were laid to rest by the side of his wife in the beautiful A.O.U.W. cemetery overlooking the city.

    Many old time cowboys, gone on before,
    Await his coming on that golden shore.
    To him they extend a welcome hand,
    A reunited and happy band. ~~ T. J. DYER ~~ View/Write Comments (count 1)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Delhotal-Murrow Wedding - 1943

    Vol 5, Iss 10 Oklahoma - Delhotal-Murrow Wedding - 1943 -- "Yes, these are my kinfolk. Clay Murrow was a longtime county clerk. Clay and Blanche were siblings of my grandfather, Lute Murrow, who was Woods and later Woods/Woodward County Representative to the Oklahoma House of Representatives from 1956 to 1966 (he preceded Lewis Kamas in that office). Other siblings included Frank Murrow of Alva and Lionel Murrow of Waynoka (two other children died very young, in 1892 and 1906). My grandparents owned Murrow Grocery in Dacoma (now Whittet's Grocery and Cowboy Grill) ... they built the State of the art refrigeration plant there in the mid-1940s, just after WWII ended. The locker plant operation opened in 1947, I believe. Besides my grandparents and parents all working there, Laura Pierce and Winifred Allen were also employees at the time the locker plant opened. Somewhere in the archives, I have a large photo of the grand opening. Max's brother, Raymond, became Chief of Police in Wichita, Kansas. Max and Raymond are both now deceased. Our aunt Blanche was married to Walter Bergersen (not Ferguson) and they lived just a few miles south of Capron until the 1960s when they moved into Alva. It was Uncle Walt's parents who were the subject of the inquiry I sent to you a week or two ago (Nels and Anne Bergersen). View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Wiley H. Cowan Obit

    Vol 5, Iss 2 Oklahoma - "I got this from Joy Cameron Sherman (Tom Dyer's granddaughter). I will send it your way at this time." -- Jim

    -- On Monday morning, November 11, 1935, the news was broadcast throughout our city and county that another of the old-time pioneers had answered the last roll call, and that great reveille had tolled for our old time friend, Wiley Cowan.

    -- Perhaps it would be more fitting to say that he was a pioneer of pioneers having spent the major portion of his long life on the early frontier of what was called The Great American Desert. He was born in the state of Illinois in October, 1847. At the age of 15 years he left the parental home to seek adventure in the west. His first venture was from Westport Landing near Kansas City, where he engaged himself as a teamster to drive an ox team in one of those overland freighters caravans over the old Santa Fe Trail to Santa Fe, New Mexico. This was in the year 1863, more than 72 years ago.

    -- While on a visit to his eldest daughter, Mrs. Hazel Wiebner (sic) and husband, Fred Wiebner (sic), who at that time were living in Springer, N. M., Wiley located the place where the old trail had been over which he had traveled more than half a century before. After his experience as a teamster and freighter, Wiley Cowan chose the life of a cowboy, and in the following year made five trips from Texas, across the wild wastes of the Indian Territory to the wide expanse of Kansas prairies, and the markets of Kansas towns. Two of the trips were with herds of cattle and three were made with herds of horses. At this time he was in the employ of a man named Col. Leroy M. T. Pope, who by the way was the grandfather of one of our genial fellow-townsmen, Roy Day, manager for the Kavannaugh (sic) and Shea Hardware Company. This man Pope was an old trail driver who followed the business for years, and who also owned a ranch in Sedgwick County, Kansas on the Ninnescah and Cowskin near Mount Hope.

    It has been suggested to me that it was at this ranch where Wiley first met the girl who in later years became his wife and companion. About the year 1874 he came to Old Kiowa in Barber County to engage in the cattle business. These were perilous days in that part of the country, Indians were on the warpath, stockades were being built at old Kiowa and Medicine Lodge to protect the white settlers who had come to Barber County to find homes. He had associated with him the late Clark Bunton, with whom he had worked on ranch and trail, sharing each others trials and hardships, they became life-long friends.

    -- Wiley Cowan, the cowboy, none better I'll own,
    Astride a cayuse, has ever been known,
    He started out in his youthful years,
    To follow the droves of long-horn steers,
    In the early spring when the grass was green,
    From San Antonio up to Abilene,
    Across rivers, mountains, through woodland and vale,
    He traversed the famous old Chisholm Trail,
    And many times, on his trusted steed,
    He pointed the herd in a wild stampede.

    -- On December 22, 1882, he was united in marriage to Manda Day near Anthony, Kansas. It was a happy union of congenial lives. Life took on a more serious side as the problems of life confronted them. Five children came to bless this union, three of whom are still living: John Cowan, of Buffalo, Okla., and Mrs. Hazel Wiebner (sic) and Mrs. Opal Nighswonger of Alva, Oklahoma.

    -- After their marriage they followed the vocations of ranch life in the year 1883. The Salt Fork and Eagle Chief pool was organized, its personnel was composed of the following members: D. R. Streeter, M. J. Lane, Frank Shelly, Billy Powell, Charles Moore, A. W. Rumsey, Charles Stowell, Major Moderwell, D. Donovan, Wiley Cowan, Clark Bunton, Henry Wick and Frank Stacy. Wiley Cowan was chosen as foreman of the organization. He (sic) remained in the cattle business until the Cherokee Strip Livestock Association was disbanded, and the cowmen driven out of the Cherokee Outlet.

    At the opening of the Outlet to settlement in 1893, Wiley Cowan secured a fine homestead in the Ashley community where the family resided for something like 12 years. Here he organized the first Sunday school in that neighborhood, and was chosen the superintendent, assisted by his good wife as co-worker in this laudable undertaking. It is related that not all of the adult population attended the school at first, but the children (God bless them) they were there, and going home gave such glowing accounts of the Sunday school that the parents were induced to go.

    It became known far and wide as the most earnest organization of its kind. It was a Union Sunday School. Wiley Cowan's philosophy of life was to do good, his creed, the Golden Rule. Whatsoever ye would that others should do unto you do ye even so to them. This was exemplified in his every day life, as many of this hold time neighbors and associates will gladly tell you when they recall the many kindly acts and liberal generosity of their old time friend, Wiley Cowan.

    -- Selling the old homestead, he bought land and established a ranch near Buffalo and Selman in Harper County, Oklahoma, and which they still own. Bereft of his wife and loving companion on February 24, 1924, he divided his time among his children. In the early part of 1927, he was stricken with paralysis at his ranch near Buffalo, at the home of his son, John Cowan. The malady did not readily respond to treatment, later he was brought to the home of his daughter, Mrs. Opal Nighswonger, at Alva. Here he spend the remainder of his life a helpless invalid until an all-wise Heavenly Father released him and said, 'Tis enough, come up higher. His age, 88 years and 14 days.

    -- Eighteen years beyond the allotted span
    The Lord accorded to mortal man
    He lived, his later years so weak and frail,
    Ere he reached the end of the long, long trail.
    'Twas in the early dawn, a fitting time,
    To leave this earth to a happier clime,
    When the angels came and wafted away
    His imprisoned spirit from its home of clay,
    The realms of that eternal day.

    -- With many of his hold friends and neighbors, I attended the last rites to pay a tribute to the respect of our departed friend who was beloved by all who knew him best. At the Maughlin and Howerton Funeral Parlor where it was held, the casket was banked with many beautiful wreaths of flowers, his inanimate form reposing among them as if only asleep. A fitting eulogy was given by Rev. Phil Deschner, pastor of the First Methodist Church, while the music by the ladies quartet was beautiful and appropriate.

    -- Six of his grandsons were the pall bearers, a splendid tribute by these young men to the grandfather. Their names, Orville Wiebner, Anadarko, Okla., Paul Wiebner, Alva, John Nighswonger, Alva; Hal Cowan, Woodward; But Wenel, Hardtner, Kans., Bob Selman, Woodward. There was one grandson, J. Wiley Cowan whose home is in Glendale, Calif., who could not be present at his grandfather's funeral. His remains were laid to rest by the side of his wife in the beautiful A.O.U.W. Cemetery overlooking the city.

    -- Many old time cowboys, gone on before,
    Await his coming on that golden shore.
    To him they extend a welcome hand,
    A reunited and happy band.
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    Obituary: Helen Lee (Snapp) London - 08/05/1912 to 06/03/2006...

    Vol 8, Iss 23 Helen Lee, daughter of Lucy (Welty) and Bunk Snapp was born in a log cabin near Packard Creek 9 miles West of Freedom, Oklahoma, August 5, 1912. She passed away at the Alva Share Medical Center on the 3 June 2006, at the age of 93 years, 9 months and 28 days. She attended the White Cloud and the Fairvalley Rural Grade Schools and graduated from the Freedom High School with the Class of 1930. She and her mother operated the Snapp Ranch after the death of her father, fixing fence, caking cattle from a wagon and what ever needed to be done. Miss Snapp was married to Levi London in Alva on May 22, 1941 making their home on the Snapp Ranch. To their marriage two children, Vilene and Jim were born. In 1978 they moved to Freedom, Oklahoma to make their home. Mr. London passed away on April 17, 1978. She was a member of the Freedom Museum and the "Freedom Old Cowhand Association" and was honored the "Old Cowhand for 2004."

    Helen (Snapp) London's mother was Freedom, Oklahoma's "1st Honored Pioneer Rancher of 1956." Mrs. Lucy Welty Snapp was chosen to be the honored Pioneer Rancher of the Freedom Rodeo celebration. Lucy and her husband Bunk started their ranching operation on a site east of Freedom, and Lucy worked on the range right along with Bunk throughout their lifetime. Bunk and two sons Frank and Jim preceded Lucy in death. During the years following their deaths, Lucy and her daughter Helen managed the ranch. Helen later married Levi London and they continued with much the same operation as Bunk and Lucy had established. A daughter, Vilene, and a son, Jim, were born and reared there. At the time of Lucy's death in 1974, she was 96 years of age. Since that time Helen continued to keep the Bar-S Brand of her parents. Today the original ranch is intact and is managed by Lucy's grandson, Jim London. He along with his wife, Deb, his son Levi, and daughter Randus, live in the same house where Lucy and Bunk began their ranching.

    Helen had always marveled on the advances from her birth to her later years in life. Mrs. London was preceded in death by her mother on July 22, 1974, her father on July 21, 1933, two brothers, Frank on July 17,1926 and Jim on September 28, 1939. Helen is survived by her daughter, Vilene Hansen of Alva and her son and his wife, Jim and Deborah of Freedom. Two grandchildren, Levi London and his wife Amy of Sachse, Texas and Randus London of Stephenville, Texas. A number of nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. Contributions may be made in her memory to the Freedom Ambulance Service or the Freedom Fire Department. -- Wharton Funeral Chapel - Helen London Obituary
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    The Rest of the Story...

    Vol 8, Iss 20 1950's Memories... "The Foreman Scotty Show and 3-D Danny were favorites of mine growing up in the 50's in Helena (Alfalfa County), Oklahoma. The Helena kids were all so excited when 3-D Danny and another character, Hog Waller, appeared at the Helena Fair one year in the 50's as part of our Saturday evening entertainment, along with WKY Radio Disc Jockey Dale Webha. Danny was also the early morning Disc Jockey at WKY and mom would turn up the kitchen radio very loud at 7 AM weekdays as Danny was proclaiming he was the "Rockin' Bird" and it was time to "rise and shine". This was our wake up call to get up and come to breakfast so we could get ready for school. We also looked forward each Saturday night @ 10:30 PM to watch Danny Williams on Channel 4's Championship Wrestling. My grandpa (Glenn Dague), who lived next door, just made sure we were up early for Sunday School the next morning if we did stay up late. For the past several years, Danny was my clock radio wake up call on KOMA radio, the other favorite Oklahoma radio station from the 50's. Now, 50 years later, Danny doesn't get up early enough for my 4:30 AM alarm, but I still listen to him today on KOMA radio during my morning commute to work each day in OKC @ 5:30 AM. I can even listen to DJ Ronnie Kaye on KOMA and my favorite golden oldies on the drive home, and remember the fun we had at the sock hop dances Ronnie hosted in the 60's. Thanks to Danny and Ronnie still hanging around playing my favorite tunes of the 50's and 60's, I don't feel "quite" so old. They help keep the wonderful memories of growing up in rural Northwest Oklahoma fresh in my mind."

    ..."Dan D. Dynamo was at the Red Bud Supermarket on east Flynn where Marshall Funeral Home is now. I got his autograph there in the 50's. They also had a large hoola hoop contest in the parking lot there. Speaking of kids shows does anyone remember the Popeye cartoon show starring the captain of the good ship "K-George" (KGEO)broadcast from Enid in the 50's?"

    Mabel Oakes Murder - 191... "Moman Pruiett compiled the most impressive record of success in death penalty cases of any lawyer in America. From 1900 to 1935, he defended 343 persons accused of murder as found on page 614-615 of the Loyola of Los Angeles Law Review when he was excluded as a candidate for Lawyer of the Century. Three-hundred four of his clients were acquitted-not one was executed. Why did he help prosecute N.L. Miller? Were his clients part of bands like the Southern Tenant Farmers Union? Also See Gerald F. Uelmen, Moman Pruiett, Criminal Lawyer, CRIMINAL DEFENSE, May-June 1982, at 35. See also Pruiett's autobiography, MOMAN PRUIETT, CRIMINAL LAWYER (1944). Do you have any information about the Oakes' land North of Alva, OK? Who owned land near there and who owns Oakes' and the surrounding land now?

    ..."That''s an interesting question. Who owned land near Oakes' north of Alva? AND... Who owns the Oakes' land now? Why did Moman Pruiett took the side of the prosecution? I am not quite sure of that yet, but suspect that his father-in-law (Hon. August T. Sniggs) whom was living in Alva, Oklahoma, Woods County during that time. The "Law Enforcement League" made Pruiett an offer he couldn't refuse. The League was one of Pruiett's chief hecklers. During the defense of Jim Stevenson, Judge Maben, and Agnes Gilbert, Moman had broken the morale of the League. The League persuaded that they couldn't beat Moman Pruiett, decided to enlist him (Pruiett) and made Pruiett an offer of $3,000 in cash back in 1910, to engage him to go to Woods to act as special prosecutor in the N. L. Miller vs. State of Oklahoma murder trial. This information came from a book written about Moman Pruiett (He Made It Safe To Murder - The Life of Moman Pruiett) by Howard K. Berry, pages 346-352. Moman and his 2nd-wife, Leda Sniggs Pruiett were married on July 7, 1903 in Leda's hometown of Alva, Oklahoma -- their marriage lasted forty-one years until her death in 1944. Leda Sniggs was the daughter of August T. Sniggs of Alva, Oklahoma Territory, and the sister of his junior law partner Victor Sniggs.

    Apple Blossom Time In the Valley... "Howdy! It is chilly up here in NE KS. Today's high was 70 with the overnight low forcasted to be in the low to mid 40s, but who is complaining? I just wanted you to know that our hummingbirds have returned. Last week I saw one Ruby-Throated hummer visiting our nectar/sugar water station. Our Columbine is in bloom and that usually tells us it is time for the little fellows to arrive, so we put out our feeding stations. Of course all feather of other birds find it tasty, Baltimore Orioles, Bluejays, and others. Cheers!"

    Old Opera House Murder - The Preliminary... "Why did Claud McCrory resign in such a hurry as prosecuting attorney when public sentiment had arisen that he might be stalling -- had to do one or the other ... resign or prosecute the defendant Miller for the murder of young, innocent Mabel Oakes? Why was the League depleting it's treasury with it's runners and detectives during the September, 1911 trial looking for the whereabouts of ex-county attorney Claud McCrory? Where did Claud McCrory vanish after he resigned as county attorney and prosecutor of the Miller murder case?
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    In Memory of Jessie Beulah (Clark) Meyer....

    Vol 7, Iss 2 Jessie Beulah (85 years), older sister of J. L. "Bud" Clark and the daughter of Ida Cloe (Heaton) and Joseph Lawrence Clark, passed away January 11, 2005, Wednesday, at the Perry memorial Hospital in Perry, Oklahoma. Services were held Jan. 15, 2005, Wharton Funeral Chapel. Jessie was born on Oct. 16, 1919 northwest of Alva.She attended the Panama and Pleasant Hill Rural Grade Schools and helped her family on the farm. Jessie Clark was married to Leo August Meyer on September 14, 1941 at her parents home east of Alva. To their marriage, three children: John Clark, Kenny Leo and Sharon LeVerne were born. Leo passed away on Oct. 28, 2001. Some of you might remember Jessie as a familiar face around the downtown square in Alva. Jessie was a salesperson in several different stores for many years. She enjoyed sewing and baking. You can read more about the Meyer families in The First 100 Years of Alva, Oklahoma, pg. 547 thru 548. -- Jessie B. Meyer's Obituary View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    1/4/1924 Obituary - Osborne Family

    Vol 9, Iss 16 While we were at the news archives in the Oklahoma History Center earlier this week we found this obituary in the January 10, 1924, The Daily Alva Review-Courier. That and the news stories of the fire were easy to find even though we only had the year (1924) to go by.

    OBITUARY... Harvey Osborne was born at Cofferville, Indiana, November 9, 1878 and departed this life on January 4, 1924, at the age of 45 years, 2 months and 27 days.

    Alice Opal Osborne was born near Alva, March 20, 1909 and died January 4, 1924, at the age of 14 years, 9 months and 15 days.

    George Galen Osborne was born near Alva, February 26, 1912 and died January 4, 1924.

    James Oscar Osborne died at the Alva hospital Sunday January 6, at the age of 13 years and three months. Oscar, it will be remembered, was badly burned with his father, sister, and brother, who died Friday morning. he was very patient in his condition, and while his father, sister, and brother were being laid to rest besides his other brothers and sisters, Saturday afternoon, January, little Oscar lay patiently awaiting the return of his relatives and friends to be at his bedside. He never complained and was pleased with all that was being done for him.

    Harvey Osborne joined the Methodist Episcopal church at the age of 18. At the age of 22 he married Miss Minnie Perks, and to this union was born ten children, of whom two daughters survive. One year after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Osborne came to Oklahoma, and settled on a claim 18 miles northwest of Alva, where he resided for nearly 15 years. Then moving to Missouri for one ywar they decided to come back to the old homestead. The family then moved to Hardtner, Kansas, on a wheat farm where they resided for three years. In the fall of 1923 the family moved back to the old homestead, where they remained until the death of Mr. Osborne, and three of the children in a sad accident.

    Mr. Osborne and his three children have joined the other five children in the Great Beyond. They leave to mourn, a mother and wife, Mrs. Minnie Osborne, two sisters and daughters, Mrs. Ira Maxwell and Mrs. Ralph Maxwell, and a host of relatives and friends.

    The entire community and the people of the surrounding neighborhood sympathize with the bereaved family.

    Card of Thanks -- We wish to express our sincere gratitude tot he people of the neighborhood and ocunty for the many kindnesses they have shown us in these terrible hours of sorrow. We also wish to thank the merchants and business men, and the clubs of the different towns, who so kindly came to our aid. Mrs. Harvey Osborne, Mr. and Mrs. Ira Maxwell, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Maxwell.
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    Pioneer Pauline Estella (Johnson) Whitney - 02/04/1917-03/27/2008

    Vol 10, Iss 13 Obit - Pauline Whitney (February 4, 1917 - March 27, 2008) VIEW/SEND CONDOLENCES Another great pioneer of Northwest Oklahoma passed away March 27, 2008, at Waynoka, Oklahoma, at the age of 91 years, 1 month, and 23 days.

    Sandie, this NW Okie and McGill family is sending an "In Memory Donation..." for Pioneer Pauline Estella (Johnson) Whitney. One of her sons, Everette & Louise Whitney, and family, have been one of the greatest influences of this NW Okie's life.

    Pauline Estella (Johnson) Whitney's funeral services will be held at 2:00 p.m. Monday, March 31, 2008, at the Waynoka First United Methodist Church with Rev. Don Hull officiating. Interment will be in the Waynoka Municipal Cemetery under the direction of Marshall Funeral Home of Waynoka, LLC.

    Pauline Estella Whitney, daughter of the late Anderson W. and Lenola Ethel (Norman) Johnson, was born February 4, 1917, in Southeastern Woods County, Oklahoma, and passed away March 27, 2008, at Waynoka, Oklahoma, at the age of 91 years, 1 month, and 23 days.

    Pauline attended Twin Oakes rural school through the eighth grade and graduated from Waynoka High School in 1934 as the Salutatorian of her class. On May 27, 1935, she was united in marriage to Vernon Everette Whitney at Alva. They made their home on the family farm until moving to Waynoka in 1959. She worked awhile at Miller's Cafe and then at Thrift-T-Wise Supermarket for 12 years. After that she helped her husband on the farm until her health began to fail. Vernon passed away April 28, 2001.

    Pauline loved to sing and with her brother, Paul, who played the guitar, entertained at many rural school programs, nursing homes, and senior citizen affairs.

    Besides her parents and her husband, she was preceded in death by five sisters, Tena Miller, Essie Strong, Ruby Unruh, Irene Webster, and Edna Mease; and three brothers, Harry, Paul, and Bill Johnson.

    Pauline is survived by three sons, Everette Whitney and his wife, Louise, of Waynoka, Lowell Whitney and his wife, Ladonna of Waynoka, and John Whitney and his wife, Jane, of Angleton, Texas; one daughter, Janice Earhart and her husband, Howard, of Alva, Oklahoma.

    Also surviving are 12 grandchildren and their spouses: Angela Pearson and Dennis of Buffalo, Vernon Whitney and Mary of Clinton, Chris Whitney of Seattle, Washington, Mike Whitney and Connie of Burleson, Texas, Brian Whitney and Gwen of Waynoka, Brett Earhart of Waukomis, Lora Bromley and Gerald of Gardner, Kansas, Jeff Earhart and Stacy of Savannah, Georgia, Drew Earhart of Oceanside, California, Jill Craft and Ben of Lockhart, Texas, Jay Whitney and Tracy of Manville, Texas, and Jacquie Hornback and Bobby Joe of Lake Jackson, Texas; other relatives and friends.

    Memorial contributions may be made through the funeral home to the Waynoka Nursing Home Activity Fund or the Waynoka First United Methodist Church."
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    1948 - Old School Bell & DeGeer's

    Vol 10, Iss 43 1948 - Old School Bell & DeGeer's The Oklahoman, dated May 2, 1948, page 16, mentioned this headline, Old Bell Rings Out Memories.

    The Oklahoman, 1948 -- "Some 46 years ago (1902) Mrs. Samuel G. Welles, then Miss Mab DeGeer, rang the bell at Mirable school, Woods county, for what she thought was the last time.

    "The young teacher turned her back on the school to marry a young Episcopal minister, who had been sent into the cherokee strip as a missionary.

    "A few days ago on Mrs. Welles 70th birthday she and Mrs. Frank L. Humphrey, 1925 NW 40, 'had fun' ringing the old school bell. This time it was mounted on a special tower at Buttonwood farm. Mrs. Welles present home 11 miles out of Trenton, N.J.

    "Mrs. humphrey met Welles when he was on the staff of a church in Cincnnati. Mrs. Humphrey's parents came to Oklahoma in 1911 and a year later Welles and his new wife came back. They had been married in Wichita a few years earlier.

    "Mrs. Welles taught school at Mirable several years before her marriage. The school was on the homestead of her aunt, Miss Hessie Renfrew, who staked claim there in the strip opening of 1893.

    "Welles advanced through the Episcopal clergy until at the time of his death about 10 years ago (1938) he was canon of the cathedral at Trenton.

    "When the old school near Alva was torn down recently Mrs. Welles children joined in presenting the 300-pound iron bell to her.

    "The tower was designed by her daughter, Mrs. Charles Owen, Storrs, Conn., college art instructor. The bell was purchased and delivered by a son, Samuel G. Jr., associate editor of Time magazine.

    "A cousin, Renfrew I. DeGeer, Alva, handled the acquisition at the Oklahoma end.

    Other Welles children are Edward, dean of the Episcopal cathedral, Buffalo, N. Y.: Mary Pauline, freelance writer, and muriel, wife of Ted Hall, editor of the Milburn, N. J., newspaper.

    "Mrs. Humphrey went to New Jersey to be with Mrs. Welles on her birthday and spent the day at the palatial home ringing the old bell and talking over old times. She stopped in Cincinnati to visit friends and relatives before coming back to Oklahoma City."
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    Pioneer John J. Whitney, Woods County, OK

    Vol 10, Iss 13 This bio was written by Pauline Whitney for the Pioneer Footprints Across Woods County history book, published 1976, and appeared on page 748.

    John J. Whitney left his home in Iowa in 1890. After spending some time in Texas and Kansas he came to Woods County. In 1901 he settled on a claim east of Waynoka in the Galena Township.

    On December 21, 1902 John Whitney was married to Cloy McCray at the old town of Augusta. Cloy McCray had come to the Galena area with her parents in 1890. She had attended Northwestern Normal School and had taught school at Griever and Twin Oaks before her marriage. They established a home on the claim, NE1/4 of Section 19-24-14. John and Cloy Whitney had three daughters, Edna, Cecile and Mildred and a son, Vernon.

    Later the Whitney's bought the SE1/4 Section 19 and this half section of land was owned and operated by their son. The Whitney's also bought the SE1/4 Section 18 across the road from the original claim from Walter Cope and this land was owned and operated by Edna and her husband.

    In 1939 they also bought another quarter of land which was NW1/4 Section 21-24-14. This place was owned by Cecile and her husband. All the Whitney children attended Highland rural school in Woods County.

    In 1928 John and Cloy established a home in Alva. John Whitney passed away on August 4, 1959 at the age of 88 years and cloy passed away on January 18, 1970 at age of 89. Mildred lived in the home that the Whitney's bought when they moved to Alva.

    During the 1920's, Mr. Whitney built an outdoor platform at the farm place, and for several years held old time country dances. This furnished recreation and entertainment for both young and old in the surrounding communities.

    In the late 1930's jack rabbits became numerous and were destroying crops in this area. Rabbit drives were organized. Since the Whitney place was located about the center of Galena Township the hunters would form lines around the outside of the area, and armed with clubs they would drive the rabbits to the center and kill what they could. Lunch was always served when they reached the center.

    Edna Whitney married Fred Denker and after living in the Enid area, in in California, and then in the Waynoka area, they made their home in Alva. They had two children, John B. and Freda.

    Cecile Whitney married Estel Haltom and they lived in Hopeton. They had three daughters, Leatrice, Dorothy and Ava.

    Mildred Whitney married Glenn Curtis and they lived in Alva. They had one daughter, Sharon.

    Vernon Whitney married Pauline Johson and after living on the home place for several years they moved and lived in Waynoka. They had four children: Everette, Lowell, Janice and John. (written, compiled by Pauline (Johnson) Whitney).
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    Feb., 1924 - Oklahoma Marriages

    Vol 9, Iss 16 We thought you might get a kick out of the way some of these February, 1924 marriage announcements were written up in the paper. AND... If you know of someone looking for anyone listed here, send them a copy of the writeup.

    McReynolds-Groh -- "Miss Lela McReynolds, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. H. McReynolds of north of Alva, and Mr. Adolph Groh, were united in marriage Saturday evening at the home of Rev. Meyer, of the Lutheran church. The wedding came as a surprise to the many friends of the contracting parties, both of whom are residents of this city. The bride is a girl possessing a personality of lovable sincerity and charm, and has many friends in both school and business circles. She is a graduate of Alva High School, later attending the college for several terms of work. The groom is a nephew of the Rauh boys living east of Alva, and is a young man of sterling qualities. Mr. and Mrs. Groh will make their home in this city."

    Wilburg-Brace -- "Addison F. Brace, 24, and Alice Opal Wilburg, 18, both of Waynoka, were married by County Judge Glaser at his chambers in the courthouse, February 4th (1924)."

    Gandy-Hahn -- "Word has been received that Mrs. Kate C. Gandy and Royal H. Hahn were married at Placentia, California, January 26, 1924. Mr. and Mrs. Hahn are both well and favorably known in Alva and Woods county, having resided here for a number of years. The friends of the couple extend congratulations."
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    Pioneer Sandor J. Vigg - Alva, OK

    Vol 9, Iss 51 You will remember Sandor J. Vigg and the prosecuting attorney in the the 1910 murder trial of Nelson L. Miller (Old Opera House Murder of Mabel Oakes), in Woods County, Oklahoma, at Alva and later the venue was changed to Woodward, Oklahoma. We found this additional information on Sandor Vigg in the 1916 history book, A Standard History of Oklahoma, pg. 1501, Vol. 4, by Joseph B. Thoburn.

    Sandor J. Vigg was born July 22, 1879, in Austria-Hungary, and was the son of Georgia and Elizabeth (Berekszazi) Vigg. The father, Georgia, was born in 1852, in the same country, and was a small farmer in his ative land, where the family had lived for generations. he could not see any promising future before him in austria, and accordingly, in 1891, came to the United States, of the opportunities of which land he had heard so much. he was without capital, but located on a farm in Barber County, Kansas, where through economy and thrift, united with tireless labor, he managed to secure a small property, and in 1897 moved to Woods county and settled on Government land, 12-1/2 half mile northwest of Alva. here he has since developed into a successful farmer, and his career was one worthy of emulation by the youth of the land, and worthy of the respect of all who admire self-made manhood. Georgia Vigg was married in 1876 to Elizabeth Berekszazi, who a]was born in 1852 in the same locality as her husband, and they became the parents of four sons and three daughters, as follows:

  • Sandor J.;
  • Mark K., educated at Northwestern State Normal, of Alva, married in 1912, Charles Duncan, a native of New Jersey and a successful merchant at Culver City, California, and had one child, Eugene;
  • Julia, educated at Oklahoma Northwestern Normal School, taught in the public schools of Woods County, but in 1916 she was residing at Los Angeles, California;
  • There were three sons and one daughter, who were deceased by the time this history was written.

  • Sandor J. Vigg received his early education in the schools of his native land and was 12 years of age when he emigrated to the United States with his parents. later he went to the public schools of Barber County, Kansas, and completed his preparatory studies i the Oklahoma Northwestern Normal School, at Alva, where he was graduated in the class of 1906. At that time he entered upon the study of law, i the legal department of the University of Kansas, and graduated there in 1908, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, and June 4th of that year was admitted to the bar of Oklahoma, after successfully passing an examination before the Supreme Court. He took up his professional duties at Alva, where he opened an office and continued in a general practice until 1910, when he was elected prosecuting attorney of Woods County. In 1912 he received the re-election. In October, 1915, Sandor was appointed county attorney of Woods County, Oklahoma, to fill a vacancy occasioned by the removal of the regularly elected county attorney of Woods County.

    Sandor Vigg was a republican and took a keen interest in the success of his party. He was connected with the local lodges of the Masons, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Modern Woodmen of America.

    On June 25, 1910, at Cherokee, Oklahoma, Sandor was married to Nettie A. Paul, daughter of Otto and Callie (Davis) Paul, natives of Franklin, Indiana. Callie was born in June, 1884, at Franklin, Indiana, and graduated from Oklahoma Northwestern Normal School in 1908, and before her marriage was for 4 years a teacher in the Cherokee High School. 3 children had been born to Sandor and Cllie Vigg:
  • harriet, born September 15, 1911;
  • Paul, born January 14, 1914;
  • Karl, born October 25, 1915.

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    Pioneer John B. Doolin, Sr. - Alva, OK

    Vol 10, Iss 3 "On July 3, 1913, at Pawhuska, Oklahoma, he was united in marriage with Miss Leo Museller. To this union came two children, to-wit, John B., Jr., born May 25, 1918, and James Museller, born June 24, 1920. The widow and both sons survived him. He died on December 30, 1939, interment at Alva." -- SBW - OkieLegacy Comment
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    Frieda W. Wiersig (105), Alva, OK - Obituary

    Vol 10, Iss 19 Frieda W. Wiersig (105), Alva, OK - Obituary -- Frieda Wilhelmine, daughter of Lena (Detmer) and Benjamin Meier was born near Lincoln, Kansas, on October 29, 1902. She passed away at the Alva Share Medical Center on 9 May 2008, at the age of 105 years, 6 months and 11 days. She attended the Elkhorn Township School and the Lutheran School near Lincoln, Kansas, where she learned German. In 1920 the family moved to Broken Arrow, Oklahoma.

    Miss Meier was married to G.H. Wiersig at the Lutheran Church in Broken Arrow on August 21, 1927. To their marriage three children, Hubert, Arlene and Virgil were born. G.H. passed away on November 25, 1975.
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    Obit - ARMOR, Keith Ann

    Vol 9, Iss 31 "Keith Ann Armor, 76, died on July 27, 2007, at Mercy Hospital in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma after a long illness. She was born to Jesse and Daphne Plank in Enid, Oklahoma, on June 9, 1931. She was raised in Fairview, Oklahoma, and graduated from Fairview High School in 1949.

    She was united in marriage to George William 'Bill' Armor on August 16, 1954. The couple had been married for more than fifty-two years at the time of her death. Keith Ann taught English Literature and United States Government, among other subjects, at Laverne High School from 1959 to 1993.

    Governor Nigh appointed her to several state educational boards, including the curriculum and block grant boards. She also served on the OEA professional standards board. In 1991 she received the Oklahoma Academic Bowl Coach of the Year Award. In her later years, she remarked that she had the opportunity to teach three generations of Laverne students.
    ,br> She was so well respected by her fellow teachers and administrators that when she announced her retirement in 1991, the school board asked her to teach part-time for another two years, which she accepted.

    She earned her Bachelors of Arts in English Literature from the University of Oklahoma in Norman in 1954, where she was a member of Delta Gamma. While at OU, she played piccolo for the Pride of Oklahoma Marching Band, and played the flute in the OU Symphony Orchestra. She was one of the 'Top Ten Senior Women' at OU.

    She received her Masters of Arts in Education from Northwestern Oklahoma State University at Alva in 1965.

    Keith Ann began her teaching career in Rio Linda, California, near Sacramento, in 1958 where she taught special education and English, after Bill received orders to begin his active JAG officer service at McClellan Air Force Base.

    From 1956 to 1958 the couple lived in Europe where Bill was first stationed at Furstenfeldbruck Air Force Base in Germany and later at Ellinikon Air Force Base in Athens, Greece.

    She showed great courage and perseverance in a country that had just ended a bloody civil war, and she had many intriguing Cold War stories from her life in Greece.

    Because the Air Force had no hospital in Athens, she gave birth to their first child, Camille, at the NATO base in Izmir, Turkey.

    She was active in the Delphian Club (where she served as the state literacy chairman), the United Methodist Women, Delta Kappa Gamma, and she served on the board of directors for the Woodward Plains Indian and Pioneer Museum. She was a faithful communicant of the United Methodist Church.

    She is survived by her husband Bill and four children: Camille Dowers and husband John of Blanchard; Clark Armor and wife Gina of Norman; Vance Armor of Oklahoma City; and Jess F. Armor and wife Becky of Edmond; six grandchildren-Graham, Michael, Madeline, Matthew, Zachary, and Andrew; three step-grandchildren-Emalie, Evan, and Erron; and one step great-grandchild-Hailey. She is also survived by her sister, Jean Clendening of Richardson, Texas, and her brother, Charles R. Plank of New York City." -- Published in The Oklahoman on 7/30/2007.
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    Ancestors of Ida Belle Barnett...

    Vol 7, Iss 39 "Charles Cook sent us this information concerning the Ancestors of Ida Belle Barnett. Here is a sample of that information that you will find RE: Joseph E. & Wealthy Ann (BROWN) BARNETT

    2. Joseph E. BARNETT, born 06 December 1850 in Bedford County, Pennsylvania; died 04 September 1922 in Waynoka, Woods County, Oklahoma. He was the son of 4. David Carl BARNETT and 5. Elizabeth EVANS. He married 3. Wealthy Ann BROWN, 24 October 1872 in Lucas County, Iowa.

    3. Wealthy Ann BROWN, born 23 November 1853 in Frankfort, Peoria County, Illinois; died 26 December 1935 in Waynoka, Woods County, Oklahoma. She was the daughter of 6. James Henry BROWN and 7. Elvira FOSTER.

    Children of Joseph BARNETT and Wealthy BROWN:
    1 i. Ida Belle BARNETT, born 07 October 1873 in Lucas County, Iowa; died 03 December 1940 in Dacoma, Woods County, Oklahoma; married Hugh MARTIN, Jr. 02 April 1895 in Reno County, Kansas.

    ii. James Almont BARNETT, born 20 March 1875 in Reno County, Kansas; died 19 July 1959 in Woods County, Oklahoma. Notes for James Almont Barnett: He never married. James Almont Barnett was Buried in Waynoka Cemetery, Woods County, Oklahoma

    iii. Clyde William BARNETT, born 02 October 1877 in Reno County, Kansas; died 16 August 1953 in Woods County, Oklahoma. Notes for Clyde William Barnett was never married. Clyde was buried in Johnson Cemetary, Waynoka, Oklahoma

    iv. Lemuel BARNETT, born 15 March 1880 in Reno County, Kansas; died in Reno County, Kansas, As infant.

    v. Samuel BARNETT, born 15 March 1880 in Reno County, Kansas; died in Reno County, Kansas, As an infant.

    vi. Hannah Alvira BARNETT, born 01 July 1881 in Reno County, Kansas; died 05 December 1969 in Cimarron County, Oklahoma; married Edward Everet KILLOUGH 03 October 1906 in Ziegler, Woods County, Oklahoma Territory; born 05 December 1885 in Dexter, Kansas; died 27 February 1976 in Boise City, Cimarron County, Oklahoma. Notes for Hannah Alvira Barnett: Hannah''s future husband, four years younger than she, was one of her students at Cottonwood. Hannah Alvira Barnett's Occupation: 1901, School teacher, Cottonwood School, Woods County, Oklahoma Territory

    vii. Carl David BARNETT, born 02 December 1883 in Reno County, Kansas; died 28 January 1949 in Kansas City, Missouri; married (1) Golden Welsh 28 July 1909 in Alva, Woods County, Oklahoma; married (2) Louise SHORT 20 July 1924. Notes for Carl David Barnett: Had no known children. His death was from complications caused by exposure to mustard gas during WWI. Carl David Barnett's Military service: WW I veteran; Occupation: Manager of a Fred Harvey Restaurant

    viii. Daisy Sophia BARNETT, born 01 December 1888 in Reno County, Kansas; died 29 October 1955 in Waynoka, Woods County, Oklahoma; married William TALKINGTON 03 August 1925 in Woodward, Oklahoma; born 1866; died 10 October 1927 in Waynoka, Woods County, Oklahoma. Notes for William Talkington: A widower at the time of their marriage. William Talkington's Occupation: Owned general store in Waynoka, Oklahoma." View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Obituary - Wanda Jean (Jeanie) Leamon...

    Vol 8, Iss 6 Wanda Jean (Jeanie) Leamon, 75, daughter of the late John William and Violet Grace (Newman) Whittet, was born March 10, 1930, at Dacoma, Oklahoma, and passed away February 7, 2006, at Alva, Oklahoma. After Jeanie graduated from Dacoma High School with the Class of 1948, she attended Enid Beauty College. On September 3, 1948, she was united in marriage to Wayne A. Leamon at Dacoma, Oklahoma, where they made their home. Jeanie worked for a short time at the ASCS office, Central National Bank, and Merle Norman in Alva. Jeanie was a member of the Dacoma United Methodist Church where she served as the choir director for many years. Besides her parents, she was preceded in death by one sister, Maybel Reynolds; and two brothers, Charles (Bud) Whittet and Billy Wayne Whittet. Jeanie is survived by her husband Wayne, of Dacoma; three daughters, Connie Mitchel and her husband, Mike, of Alva, Cathy Hickman and her husband, Steve, of Cherokee, and Christa Hughes and her husband, Dean, of Carmen; seven grandchildren, Representative Jeffrey Hickman of Dacoma, Jeremy Hickman of Enid, Mikela Jean Mitchel of Norman, Jay Mitchel of Edmond, Jared Mitchel of Edmond, Andrea Jean Hughes of Oklahoma City, and Aaron Hughes of Grove; two sisters-in-law, Floy Whittet of Dacoma, and Velma Whittet of Alva; other relatives and many friends. Read/Leave Condolescences at Marshall Funeral Home website View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    Pioneer George A. Harbaugh - Alva, OK

    Vol 10, Iss 1 George A. Harbaugh was what some might call back in those early days of Alva, Oklahoma as, "the sterling and popular citizen ..... whose is distinctively one of the representative and influential business men of the thriving little City of Alva, county seat of Woods County, needs no further voucher than the statement that he is here president of the Central State Bank and also of the Alva Roller Mills, which represent two of the most important business enterprises in Woods County."

    This and the following information was derived from the 1916 history book of Oklahoma, A Standard History of Oklahoma, pg. 1530, by Joseph Thoburn.

    George A. Harbaugh was born on the homestead farm of his father in Washington County, Iowa, on August 27, 1870. His parents were among the pioneers of Iowa, Eli and Catherine (Engle) Harbaugh, both natives of Ohio. Eli Harbaugh was born in 1825 and Catherine Engle was born in 1827. Both Eli and Catherine were educated in the old Buckeye State and their marriage was solemnized in the year 1848. They were early settlers in Washington County, Iowa, where they established their home in 1850, when that section was on the very frontier of civilization, and where the death of Eli's wife, Catherine, occurred in 1872.

    Eli Harbaugh learned in his youth the trade of cabinetmaker in Ohio. After his removal to Iowa, within about two years after his marriage, he found demand for his services as a skilled artisan at his trade. In 1884 Eli removed to Barber County, Kansas, where he purchased a farm and he continued his residence until his death, in 1907, at the age of 82 years.

    George A. Harbaugh acquired his education in the schools of his native county and was a lad of about 14 years at the time of the family moved to Barber County, Kansas, where he was reared to adult age on the homestead farm and continued his studies in the public schools. George worked with his father in the management of the home farm until 1893, when he participated in the "run" into the Cherokee Strip Outlet of Oklahoma Territory. George entered a claim to a tract of government land 7 miles from the present City of Alva, Oklahoma and gained the distinction of becoming one of the pioneer settlers of Woods County. George acquired another section of land nearby and established one of the extensive stock ranches of the county. In 1898 George Harbaugh moved from is ranch to Alva, where he engaged in the live stock and grain business and became one of the leading representatives of this line of enterprise in this northwest section of the territory. In 1916 George Harbaugh was still the owner of one of the largest and valuable land estates in Woods County.

    George was a a staunch supporter of movements advanced to obtain statehood for the territory and in the meanwhile gained precedence as a steadfast and influential business man and public spirited citizen.

    In 1906 Geore Harbaugh purchased the controlling interest in the Alva Roller Mills, which he was president and had maintained the active management. In 1914 this corporation purchased and shipped 3,500,000 bushels of wheat, handled from its chain of thirty elevators, at eligible points in Oklahoma, Kansas and Texas. The Alva Roller Mills were essentially modern in equipment and facilities. The products found a wide demand and were known for superiority, and the business, as conjoined with the extensive grain trade controlled by the operating company, represented one of the most important industrial enterprises of Northern Oklahoma.

    In 1913 George became associated with Henry E. Noble and others in the organization of the Central State Bank of Alva, of which he had been president and of which Mr. Noble was cashier.

    In politics George A. Harbaugh was aligned as a staunch supporter of the cause of the democratic party, but he was essentially a business man and had manifested "no predilection for the honors or emoluments of political office."

    At Alva, Oklahoma Territory, on November 1, 1899, George A. Harbaugh solemnized his marriage to Miss Mary Devin, who was born at Princeton, Gibson County, Indiana, in which state were also born her parents, Alexander N. and Melissa Devin. George and Mary Harbaugh had three children:

  • Paul A., born September 7, 1901;
  • melissa kathryn, born October 8, 1905;
  • Helen E., born February 2, 1912.

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    1944- Hopeton News

    Vol 10, Iss 17 This July, 1944 article in the Woods County News was written by Mrs. Frank Rolf concerning the news of Hopeton, in northwest Oklahoma.

    Mr. and Mrs. Tony Hass and famly of madison, Wisc., came Tuesday morning via train to visit at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Haas, and mr. and Mrs. Fred Haas and other relatives.

    cpl. James Nusser will report back to Temple, texas, Saturday after spending several weeks with his parents, mr. and Mrs. Charles Nusser and family and his wife's parents mr. and Mrs. Crate Heaton north of Alva. James was granted a month's leave from the hospital at Temple to help in the harvest here. Mrs. Nusser and small daughter are making their home with Jams while he is stationed in Texas.

    Pfc. Jake Haas, Jr., Marries California girl. A recent announcement has been made of the marriage of Pfc. Jake Haas, Jr., to Miss Betty Hunt of California, which occurred July 11 (1944), at Camp Beale, Calif. where Pfc. Haas has been stationed.

    He is the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Haas of Hopeton community and his many friends here are happy to offer congratulations and best wishes. Walter Hufford and Everette Nelson delivered a combine to boise city one day last week.

    Miss Willa Walker is spending a few days with her sister and husband, Mr. and Mrs. Chester Alexander.

    Stanley and Eugene Hufford visited Wed. afternoon with Billie Percival. Gary Nelson is visiting this week with his grandmother, Mrs. Ezra Butler of Byron. mack nelson spent two weeks there recently.

    Bill Haltom was an Oklahoma City visitor this week. Mrs. Otis Haltom left last week for San Diego to visit her husband, who is stationed with the navy at that place.

    Mrs. Everette Haltom and Marva Janelle are visiting this week with Everette at Corpus Christi, Texas. He is at naval training at that place.

    Kenneth Deinlein is doing relief work at the Depot in Dacoma this week. Mrs. Deinlein is attending to depot interests here during his absence. Everyone is pleased with the rain which fell in Woods county Sunday. it brought relief from the sweltering heat of last week and will enable farmers to plow wheat ground. Prospects for a feed crop are much better than last year.

    Bundle threshing was in full swing last week. Alfred Haltom has been threshing in this community.

    Leslie Eckels had the misfortune of having a vein in his arm pierced by a pitchfork tine while he was pitching with the threshing machine. The accident necessitated his taking tetanus serum.

    cpl. marvin Haltom, son of Mr. and Mrs. Wes Haltom, who is a radio operator on a bomber, was among the first in the Pathfinder group to carry paratroopers to France during the invasion on D-Day.

    Chester Alexander is recovering from an emergency appendectomy last week. A fire on the ernest Gottsch' place, which originated when J. N. W. Haltom was burning the wheat stubble in a field nearby, did considerable damage to trees about the farm site. The fire occurred the afternoon of July 4 (1944). Several neighbors helped in extinguishing the fire.

    Among those attending the races at Woodward July 4 were Claude Lisman, Frank Kolf, Roy Baxter and Harry Whittet.

    Mr.a nd Mrs. Homer Hofer and family of Hutchinson spent a few days last week with Mrs. Hofer's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wes Haltom. Billy Hofer who has been visiting his grandparents for some time returned home with them. Evelyn Ensor visited Thrusday and Friday with Marva Janelle Haltom.

    Bonnie Baines was a guest last week in the home of her grandparents, mr. and Mrs. Jim Baxter.

    Mr. and Mrs. Dale Percival and son; Mr. and Mrs. Chet Percival and son; Mr. and Mrs. Monroe Cabb and sons Billy and Roland and Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Quinn who are all employed in defense work at Wichita have returned there after spending the harvest in this community.

    Mr. and Mrs. Bob Zacher have moved into their home in Hopeton which they purchased from Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Abbott who have moved into the Martin property.

    Dr. Ensor is at his office again after attending the Republican convention last week in Chicago.

    Trouble at the POW camp reached into the Hopeton community last week when one of the escaped prisoners found his way to the Lancaster home. He was said to have cut the ground wire of their telephone to prevent their calling help.
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    Pioneer Joseph Lamar Griffitts - Buffalo, OK

    Vol 10, Iss 8 During the 20 years since his admission to the bar in Tennessee, 15 of which had been spent in Oklahoma, Joseph L. Griffitts had employed his talent and abilities in such a way as to place him among the front rank of Oklahoma lawyers, and he had the chief practice in his home town of Buffalo, Harper County.

    Joseph Lamar Griffitts was born at Friendsville, Tennessee, July 23, 1864, and represented the old and prominent family stock of that state. His parents were John W. and Mary Elizabeth (Donaldson) Griffitts. His grandfather, Manuel Griffiths, was a native of Virginia, and married a Georgia girl.

    John W. Griffitts, was born in Kentucky, June 13, 1831, and died December 18, 1909, spent his active lifetime as a farmer in Tennessee. He was also prominent in local affairs, and for twenty years was a member of the County Court of Loudon county, Tennessee, having filled that office up to the time of his death. He served as an elder in the Presbyterian Church forty years. He was married in 1856 to Mary Elizabeth Donaldson, who was born February 3, 1839, in Tennessee, and died January 16, 1897.

    Mary Elizabeth Donaldson became the mother of eight children, five sons and three daughters:

  • James Henry, born July 16, 1857;
  • Nancy Elizabeth, born September 15, 1859, married in 1886 to Samuel S. Hutsell, and in 1916 was a resident at Sweetwater, Tennessee;
  • Thomas Nelson, born September 26, 1861, a farmer at Lenoir City, Tennessee;
  • Joseph L.;
  • Stephen Alexander, born January 22, 1866, died August 18, 1913;/li>
  • Jacob Lafayette, born May 20, 1868, a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church South at Cedar Keys, Florida;
  • Lucinda Jane, born July 11, 1875, died November 28, 1903;
  • Nora Blanche was born March 20, 1877, and was still single in 1916.

  • Joseph Lamar Griffitts completed his early education in Maryville College at Maryville, Tennessee. His early life was taken up with varied labors and employments, until he realized his ambition to study law. He read his text books at Loudon, Tennessee, until 1895, and was then admitted to practice in all the courts of the state.

    From Tennessee he came to Oklahoma in 1900, and began practice at Tonkawa. While there he served as police judge until 1905 and was elected city attorney in 1907. However, in the same year, he resigned that office and moved to Buffalo, and after statehood was elected the first county judge of Harper County. That office he filled with distinction and credit for three years and two months.

    Since then he had applied all his time and energies to his large private practice at Buffalo. He was a Democrat, and was affiliated with the Masonic Order.

    At Alva, Oklahoma, February 5, 1909, Judge Griffitts married Miss Grace Pennington. She was born February 11, 1880, in Wabaunsee County, Kansas, a daughter of J. W. and Catherine Pennington, who were natives of Illinois. Grace (Pennington) Griffitts prior to her marriage was for four years a teacher in the public schools of Dewey County, Oklahoma.

    To this Griffitts reunion were born three daughters and one son: Guendolen Grace, Josephine L., Cassius Lamar and Muriel Elaine. -- Vol. V, pg. 1813, A Standard History of Oklahoma, by Joseph B. Thoburn
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    Pioneer Henry E. Noble - Alva, OK

    Vol 10, Iss 1 Remember the first hardware business in Alva, Oklahoma? According to A Standard History of Oklahoma, pg. 1523, by Joseph Thoburn, we have found out a little bit more of Noble's Hardware business and about H. "Henry" E. Noble. Henry E. Noble was a representative business man, popular citizen, cashier of the Central State Bank, and was well known figure in financial circles in the northwest section of the state. He served as a member of the city council during the first four years after the municipal government was carried forward under the city charter.

    H. E. Noble was one of the organizers of the bank of which he was cashier. He established his home at Alva in 1893, when he came to Woods County as one of the pioneer settlers upon the opening of the Cherokee Strip. He opened the first hardware establishment in the ambitious young village of Alva, in Oklahoma Territory and during the intervening years he had not only kept pace with but had been a recognized leader in the work of development and progress in Alva.

    Henry E. Noble was born at Albany, Green County, Wisconsin, on October 13, 1856, a son of Edmond B. and Nancy B. (Throop) Noble. Edmond Noble was born in Wyoming County, New York, on September 10, 1828, and his parents were natives of New England. Edmond Noble was raised educated in his native state and there he continued his residence until he became a pioneer of Wisconsin. There he followed mercantile pursuits until 1876, when he moved with his family to Kansas and became one of the pioneer settlers of Harper County, where he secured a tract of government land and where he was actively concerned in the formal organization of the county. He developed one of the excellent farms of that section of Kansas and continued his residence upon his old homestead until 1888, when he moved to Medicine Lodge, the judicial center of Barber County, where he engaged in the mercantile business.

    In 1900 Edmond Noble came to Woods County, Oklahoma, and purchased a farm 5 miles West of Alva, where he passed the residue of his life and where he died on March 13, 1912, at the age of 83 years and six months. Edmond's political allegiance had been given to the republican party.

    In 1851 Edmond B. Noble and Nancy B. Throop, who was born in Wyoming County, New York, in 1832, and whose death occurred at Albany, Wisconsin, on October 10, 1876, her father, Daniel H.Throop, was a native of Warsaw, Wyoming county, New York. Edmond B. and Nancy Noble had four children:

  • Frank, died in infancy;
  • Henry E;
  • Flora May, who was born May 31, 1862, at Albany, Wisconsin, married in 1881, James H. McKeever, their place of resident being in Wichita, Kansas, and their two children being Gertrude and Edmond H.;
  • Millie R., who was born at Albany, Wisconsin, on March 4, 1868, became the wife of Huston H. Case, in 1891, her death occurred, without child, on July 4, 1893, in Kansas City, Missouri, her remains being interred in the cemetery at Medicine Lodge, Kansas.

  • In 1878 Edmond B. Noble contracted second marriage, when he wedded Mrs. Betsie J. Hoyt, and the two children of this union, Rena and Walter, survived their father, as did also their mother.

    Henry E. Noble was indebted to the public schools of his native village for his early educational training, which was effectively supplemented by a course in the Worthington Business College, at Madison, the capital city of Wisconsin. It was in this institution he graduated in 1875 and while attending the same he employed his otherwise leisure hours by serving an apprenticeship to the tinner's trade, which he thereafter followed, as a journeyman, for two years, in the State of Iowa. He then went to Auburn, New York, where he assumed the position of bookkeeper in the mill machinery manufacturing establishment of his uncle, Gardiner E. Throop.

    After retaining this incumbency two years he returned to the West, in 1880, in which year he became bookkeeper for an agricultural implement establishment at Winfield, Kansas, where he remained engaged for a period of five years. In 1885 he moved to Medicine Lodge, where he engaged in the hardware and implement business in an independent way and continued his operations in this line until he found better opportunities, incidental to the opening to settlement of the Cherokee Strip in Oklahoma Territory, in 1893.

    As a pioneer of Alva, he opened the first hardware store in the new town, on the West side of the downtown square. You can still read the name of H. E. Noble Hardware on the building today. Henry Noble retired from the hardware and farm implement business in 1912, and in the following year he became associated with G. A. Harbaugh, Thomas G. Fennessey and others in the organization of the Central State Bank of Alva, of which he had been cashier. Through his straightforward and careful executive policies this bank had become one of the stable and popular financial institutions of Northern Oklahoma, with deposits somewhat in excess of $320,000 at the opening of the year 1915.

    Henry E. Noble became a member of Alva's first municipal council, and of this position he continued the incumbent four years. Besides his banking association, he was exclusive agent for the Buick automobiles in Woods County, Oklahoma. He completed the circle of York Rite Masonry, and attained to the 32nd degree in the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite.

    It was on January 15, 1882, at Montezuma, Iowa, that Henry E. Noble married Miss Ida A. Norris, who was born in Ohio, on January 24, 1858, who was a popular figure in the social activities of her home community, besides being a zealous member of the Christian church. Henry and Ida Noble had three children:
  • Mary Edith, born at Winfield, Kansas, on March 7, 1883, was afforded the advantages of Northwestern State Normal School, at Alva, Oklahoma, and Hardin College, at Mexico, Missouri. In 1910 she became the wife of Edward J. Hampton, and they had one child, Noble D., born May 31, 1912;
  • Ethel J., born at Medicine Lodge, Kansas, November 21, 1887, graduate of same schools as Mary Edith, and wife of Frank D. Crowell;
  • Henry Elbert, Jr., born December 2, 1899, graduate of Alva public schools and of Missouri Military Academy of Mexico, Missouri.

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    OkieLegacy Guestbook

    Vol 10, Iss 18 4/24/2008 -- POW Camp at Alva, OK... "I am attempting to get information on this subject. My father was stationed at the camp at the time of his marriage to my mother. Any info would be greatly appreciated." -- Patricia Allen - Email: patricia113045@yahoo.com

    4/24/2008 -- Chester, OK... "I attended the Chester Grade School and lived 1 mile West and 1/2 mile North of Chester." -- Larry D. Classen - Email: larrydclassen@yahoo.com

    4/23/2008 -- Ingersol, OK... "I have been looking for this town for a long time. My father was born in Ingersoll its nice to know it acctually exited." -- LINDA TUTTLE - Email: rodlin68@myway.com

    4/22/2008 -- Dixie Sherman... "Unfortunately, the Dixie Sherman hotel in Panama City, Florida was destroyed in 1970. There had been other plans for a building on that site but they were not realized and now it's a bank parking lot. The person in charge of that decision is said to have "been sick" about how things turned out.

    4/20/2008 -- Oscar Weathers... "Hi! Thanks for your website. I am looking for information on my great-grandfather, Oscar Weathers. He was a barber in Ames in the early part of 20th century. Many thanks." -- Sasha Pringle, Ontario, Canada - Email: marksash@sympatico.ca

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    Pioneer Lindsey Lowder Long, M.D. - Cimarron Territory

    Vol 10, Iss 8 It was in that historic section of Western Oklahoma that was designated as "No Man's Land" and organized into Cimarron Territory in a local way prior to the opening of Oklahoma Territory to settlement.

    It had become of the vital and prosperous sections of the state, and one of the important counties is Beaver, in which Doctor Long controlled a large and important practice as a physician and surgeon and had gained precedence as one of the representative members of his profession in Western Oklahoma.

    Dr. Long maintained his residence and professional headquarters at Beaver, the county seat, and was one of the progressive and loyal citizens of the town and county.

    Dr. Lindsey Lowder Long was born on a farm in Neosho County, Kansas, on September 22, 1875, a date that clearly demonstrates that his parents were numbered among the pioneers of that section of the Sunflower State. Lindsey Long was a son of David and Jeanette (Lowder) Long, the former a native of North Carolina and the latter of Indiana, in which latter state their marriage was solemnized in 1850.

    David Long was born in North Carolina on October 15, 1824, and his parents claimed the Old Dominion State of Virginia as the place of their nativity, the respective families having been founded in the colonial era of our national history. In 1828, when he was a child of about four years, the parents of David Long moved from North Carolina and became pioneer settlers in the wilds of Greene County, Indiana, where they passed the remainder of their lives and where the father reclaimed a farm from the wilderness.

    In Greene County, David was reared under the conditions and influences of the early pioneer days, in the meanwhile availing himself of the advantages of the schools of the locality and period, and in 1850, when about 25 years of age, he married Jeanette Lowder, who was born in Lawrence County, Indiana, on July 2, 1832, a daughter of John R. and Aesah (Hodson) Lowder, pioneers of that county, to which they moved from their native State of North Carolina.

    After his marriage Mr. Long continued his activities as a farmer in Greene County, Indiana, until 1871, when he moved with his family to Kansas and became one of the pioneer settlers in Neosho County. He purchased a tract of land two miles south of old Osage Mission, and there reclaimed a productive farm.

    He became one of the substantial and representative citizens of Neosho County and continued to reside on his fine homestead farm until his death, which occurred on March 7, 1896. His widow survived him by nearly fifteen years and was a resident of Erie, the judicial center of Noesho County, when she died November 25, 1910.

    Their children were:

  • Rev. Matthew T., born October 16,1851, a clergyman of the Methodist Episcopal Church, maintained his home in Oklahoma. In 1875 he wedded Etta Noble, and they had four children: Stella, Frederick, Ethel and Ruth. The eledest daughter, Stella, being the wife of Rufus O. Renfrew, a prominent capitalist and influential citizen of Woodward, Oklahoma.
  • Linda A., born November 9, 1853, wife of John J. Fields, editor and publisher of the Sentinel Leader at Sentinel, Washita County, Oklahoma. Their marriage was celebrated in 1875, and they had four children: Robert, Cornelius, David and May. Cornelius, was born March 6, 1855, and died on March 13.
  • Finley, born March 30, 1857, died December 20, 1908.
  • Henry, born January 22, 1861, a leading lawyer in Ottawa, Kansas.
  • John R., born February 23, 1864, a prosperous farmer of Neosho County, Kansas.
  • Rolla E., born April 27, 1869, superintendent of the city schools of Galena, Kansas.
  • May M., born March 28, 1871, a successful and popular teacher in the public schools of the City of Sherman, Texas
  • Lindsey Lowder Long, youngest of nine siblings.

  • Lindsely Lowder Long passed the days of his childhood and early youth on the homestead farm in Neosho County, Kansas. He acquired his preliminary education in the district schools and thereafter attended the public schools of Erie, the county seat, where he was graduated in the high school as a member of the class of 1895.

    In the meanwhile he had formulated definite plans for his future career, and in the year that marked his completion of his high school course he entered the University Medical College at Kansas City, Missouri, in which institution he was graduated March 19, 1898, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine.

    Immediately after his graduation in the medical college, Dr. Long came to Oklahoma Territory, and, on April 20 of the same year, he opened an office at Alva, judicial center of Woods County, where he continued in the successful practice of his profession during the ensuing eight years.

    Dr. Long then took an effective post graduate course in one of the leading medical institutions of the City of Chicago, and in May, 1906, he established his home at Beaver, Oklahoma, where he had since been engaged in active general practice and where he had secure prestige as the leading representative of his profession in Beaver county.

    Dr. Long served as mayor of Beaver, besides holding other local offices of minor order, and had shown a lively interest in all that touches the welfare and progress of his home town and county.

    While a resident of Alva he served as a member of the city council and also of the board of education, besides which he did effective service as county health officer of Woods County. He held membership in the Oklahoma State Medical Society and the American Medical Association, had completed the circles of both York and Scottish Rite Masonry, in the latter of which he had received the thirty-second degree, besides being affiliated with the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine and the Knights of Pythias.

    On September 10, 1899, Dr. Long marriage was solemnized to Maude Beegle of Alva. She was born in Kingman County, Kansas, on March, 13, 1875, and was a daughter of Adam and Elizabeth Jane (Crottzer) Beegle, both natives of Pennsylvania and both honored pioneers of Kansas.

    Mr. Beegle was born in 1836 and his death occurred June 10, 1908. His wife was born in 1832 and died on December 25, 1911. Prior to her marriage Maude (Beegle) Long had been a successful and popular teacher. Her work in the pedagogic profession having continued for three years after she had completed a course of study in the Colorado State Normal School at Greeley.

    Doctor and Mrs. Long had one child, Lenore Madge, who was born at Alva, Oklahoma, on November 12, 1902. -- Vol. V, pg. 1818, A Standard History of Oklahoma, by Joseph B. Thoburn
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    Pioneer Rufus O. Renfrew

    Vol 9, Iss 48 [This information came from the history book, A Standard History of Oklahoma, compiled by Joseph Thoburn, 1916.]

    Rufus O. Renfrew had liberal, progessive policies and clear vision that characterized his signally successful business career. He brought much initiative energy, resourcefulness and mature judgment to bear in connection with the development of the substantial and important business controlled by the Renfrew Investment Company, of which he was president. The headquarters were maintained in the city of Woodward, judicial center of the county of Woodward. He was one of the public-spirited citizens and progressive business men of Oklahoma and he was entitled to special recognition in the history of the state of his adoption.

    Rufus Renfrew was born in Caldwell county, Missouri, on 6 July 1872, the place of his nativity having been the homestead farm of his parents, James P. and Ella (Black) Renfrew.

    His early education was acquired in public schools of his native county and those of Barber county, Kansas, in which latter the family home was established when he was about fourteen years of age, in 1886.

    In 1894 he was graduated in the commercial department of the Central Normal College at Great Bend, Kansas, and devoted three years to teaching in schools of Barber county, Kansas and Woods county, Oklahoma to which latter county his parents removed in the year 1893.

    In 1894-95 he served as deputy treasurer of Woods county, under the administration of his father, who held the office of treasurer of the county two years.One year after retiring from the position, Rufus was engaged in the wholesale produce business at Alva, judicial center of Woods county.

    From 1897 to 1899 he was a salesman in a retail mercantile establishment at that place. During the following 5 years he was associated with his brother-in-law, Dyas Galbois, in the furniture and undertaking business at Alva, and soon after severing his connection with this enterprise he removed, in March 1905 to Woodward, where he established himself in the abstract, loan and investment business, the enterprise was a roving success from the time of its initiation and rapidly expanding in scope and importance.

    In 1912 the organization of Renfrew Investment Company, which incorporated under the laws of the state, with a paid-up capital of $25,000, the home office of the company being maintained at Woodward and being under the direct supervision of Renfrew, who was the president of the company from the time of incorporation.

    The Renfrew Investment Company controlled an extensive farm-loan business through northwestern Oklahoma and was rated as one of the leading concerns of its kind in the entire western part of the state, with a reputation that constitutes its best asset and gave to it invioable claim of confidence and support. Renfrew was a vigorous, aggressive executive and was the dominant force in directing the large affairs of the company which beared his name and which owes its high prestige and large success mainly to his effective policies and able administration.

    Jan. 1, 1916 renfrew was elected president of Woodward Commercial Club for one year. He and his wife held membership in the Presbyterian church in their home city and were active and liberal in the support of the various departments of its work.

    It was in a pioneer sod house near Alva, Woods County, Oklahoma, where he solemnized, on 13 Feb. 1898, the marriage of Rufus Renfrew to Miss Stella Long. Stella Long was born at Columbus, Kansas, on the 14 Nov. 1885, and her parents were, Rev. Matthew T. and Etta (Noble) Long, who were born in Indiana and became pioneers in both Kansas and Oklahoma. Rev. Long being a clergyman of the Methodist Episcopal church. The Renfrew's had one child, Edith Lillian, who was born April 14, 1900.
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    Obituary: Kent Mauntel Johnson - 03/21/1923-02/21/2006...

    Vol 8, Iss 8 Kent Mauntel, son of Grace Elizabeth (Mauntel) and Kent Wilbur Johnson was born on March 21, 1923 at Boulder, Colorado. He passed away at the Alva Beadles Nursing Home on the 21st of February at the age of 82 years and 11 months. He attended the Alva School System and graduated from high school with the class of 1939 and graduated from the University of Colorado in Boulder in 1943 with a B.S. in Chemical Engineering. He enlisted in the Army Airforce on February 28, 1944 serving in the Asiatic pacific theater in Alaska and was discharged on June 25, 1948 at the Great Falls Airforce Base at Great Falls, Montana as a First Lieutenant. On February 25, 1944 he was married to Lorraine (Lorrie) H. Bowman in Chicago. To their marriage three children, Karen Lynn, Gwenell and Kent Mauntel Jr. were born. Following their marriage they made their home in Ft. Leavenworth. Kansas, Cheyenne, Wyoming and Great Falls, Montana. After his discharge from the Air Force, he joined his father Kent W. Johnson in the Insurance Business. He was an active Insurance Agent until his retirement in 2004. Mr. Johnson was a member of the Alva First Presbyterian Church, sang in the Choir, past President of the Alva Kiwanis Club, the past Commander of the Myer-Shiel American Legion Post # 92, Independent Insurance Agents of Oklahoma (IIAO), Phi Delta Theta Fraternity and active in the Act One Theater. He was preceded in death by his daughter, Karen Schmidt on June 29, 1995, his father on August 1, 1978, his mother on August 21, 1987 and his brother, Norville on April 19, 1982. Monty is survived by his wife, Lorrie, his two children, Gwenell and Kent both of Alva, seven grandchildren and their spouses, Pam and Rick Dilbeck, Curt and Tina Schmidt, Mark and Tami Schmidt, Jeremy and Amy Burroughs, Carly Burroughs, Michael and Aimee Griffin, and Tommy and Erica Griffin. Twelve great grandchildren, two nephews Dave Johnson and his wife Louise and Chris Johnson, other relatives and friends. In lieu of flowers, the family requests contributions be made in his memory to the Alva First Presbyterian Church. -- Wharton Funeral Chapel - Online Obits View/Write Comments (count 1)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    1920 Wedding - Weinrich-Weaver...

    Vol 7, Iss 37 [taken from Renfrew's Record, dated January 2, 1920, frontpage.] -- "On the eve of the New year Rev. E. C. Anderson of the M. E. Church pronounced the ceremony that united in Marriage Mr. Leonard Weinrich and Miss Tillie Weaver, both of Alva. The wedding took place at the home of the bride's mother, Mrs. Mary Weaver, 1015 Fifth Street, at 7:00 p.m., in the presence of a few immediate friends. A buffet lunch was served after the ceremony and the young couple left over the Santa Fe for a visit with the groom's parents at Winfield, Kansas.

    Both young people are favorably known in social and business circles. Miss Weaver was employed as clerk in Rebber's Store and Mr. Weinrich as salesman for the Haines Clothing Company. After January 15 they will be at home to their friends on Second Street, in this city." View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    1920 - Friday, November 26, Local News...

    Vol 7, Iss 38 [taken from Renfrew's Record, Friday, November 26, 1920, Alva, Woods, Oklahoma.] -- Mr. John Winzel and son Joe left Monday for Geuda Springs. They went to consult Dr. Holt regarding Joe's health.

    At Bicknell's Store... All Winter Underwear was 15 per cent discount. Winter Coats were also 20 per cent off. Outings, plain and fancy, were 29 cents per yard. All draperies reduced 20 per cent.

    Mrs. Hawkins returned to her home at McPherson, Kansas, Friday after a weeks' visit with her daughter, Mrs. O. E. Lundstrom.

    Robert Maxwell of Mineola, and Miss Rosa Tedford, of Carmen were united in marriage here on Thursday evening by Rev. C. W. Harrison at his residence on Fourth street.

    Ward and Olin Surface, two popular farmers of the Mirabile neighborhood, were business callers in Alva Monday. Ward called on the Record while in town.

    Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Wyatt and Mr. and Mrs. R. O. Renfrew of Woodward, stopped in the city between trains, Friday, to visit the Renfrews while returning from Masonic Conservetory at Guthrie and Oklahoma City.

    Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Arrowsmith returned last week from MOntana and Idaho, where they spent the past six months.

    Lewis Simmons has returned from the Mayo Brothers Sanitarium at Minneapolis very much benefitted by his stay.

    Deputy Sheriff Deaton and County Attorney Bob Lasley spent Monday in Waynoka, but didn't say what the trouble was. View/Write Comments (count 0)   |   Receive updates (0 subscribers)  |   Unsubscribe


    October 4, 1905 - Welles-DeGeer Wed

    Vol 9, Iss 21 We found the following marriage of Welles-DeGeer in the October 6, 1905, The Alva Pioneer, Alva, O.T.

    Welles-DeGeer... "Married, at the Episcopal Church in Wichita, Kansas, Wednesday, October 4, 1905, Rev. S. G. Welles of Cincinnati, Ohio, and Miss Mable DeGeer of Wichita, Kansas, with Bisop F. K. Brooke of Oklahoma City, officiating.

    The groom was at one time rector of the Episcopal church at this place and is a man of high moral character and is now rector of a church in Cincinnati.

    The bride is the daughter of Mrs. L. W. DeGeer formerly of Alva, and a niece of the editor of the Record. She is a lady of rare accomplishments and refinement. The happy couple left for Kansas City where they will spend a few days with Mrs. Welles' brother, Dahl DeGeer and wife, and then go to Cincinnati, where they will make their future home.

    The Record joins their numerous friends in Alva and vicinity in wishing them peace, prosperity and plenty as they journey through life -- Record."
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    Albert "Hap" Pearson Obit - 10/7/1907-06/2/2008

    Vol 10, Iss 24 Albert Brant "Hap" Pearson, a long time Woods County, Oklahoma resident was born October 7, 1907, in Neodesha, Kansas, to Albert Francis and Elzina (Van Huss) Pearson. Hap passed away June 2, 2008, at Share Medical Center, at the age of 100 years, 7 months and 26 days.

    Hap grew up in Waldron, Kansas, where he completed the fourth grade. He came to Oklahoma in 1919 at the age of twelve. He found employment working for ranchers, farmers, and construction in the Waynoka area. While working for Jess Barker, a farmer, he was given the nickname of "Happy" by Mr. Barker because he was always singing and had a happy personality.

    In 1924 while working for Mr. Barker, Happy met his future wife, Florence Haltom. After two years of dating, they were married on September 7, 1926. During the early years of the Pearson's marriage, Happy worked in farming, railroad construction, gas stations, and the W. P. A. It was during his W. P. A. days where he began his carpentry work. The major W. P. A. project that he worked on was the Alva Swimming Pool, which is still in use. In 1941, the Pearsons moved to Alva. Happy worked as a civilian doing construction at Camp Gruber near Muskogee, the Prisoner of War Camp at Alva, the Clinton-Sherman Airbase at Burns Flat and fifteen months on the Island of Attu of the Aleutian Islands. It was after the move to Alva that Happy became Hap by his friends and co-workers.

    After Hap's return to Alva near the end of the war, he worked as a carpenter and he and Florence ran the Mitton (or... was it Minton?) Creamery and Ice Cream Store for five years. After the Mitton Family sold their business, Hap began working for Rose Brothers Construction who were building Percival Fieldhouse on the Northwestern State College Campus. Hap's main duty was the hanging of the many large mahogany doors in the building.

    After the fieldhouse was completed, Northwestern President, Sabin Percival, hired Hap for three months to build two projects. After they were completed, other projects were found for Hap to do. In 1954, new president, Dr. Brown, hired Hap as Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. In 1956, Dr. J. W. Martin, became the President of Northwestern, which was the beginning of new buildings and renovations of existing buildings and the construction of the football and baseball fields. Hap retired from Northwestern July 1, 1974.

    Hap developed a love for sports as a youngster and as a young man, he played baseball on the town teams of Greensburg, Hopeton, Dacoma, Waynoka, Alva, plus Waldron and Pratt, Kansas. In his later years, Hap loved to tube fish for bass and hunt quail. He was an avid fan and supporter of Alva and Northwestern athletics. When he had time he also enjoyed crossword puzzles, rodeos, western novels, music, dominoes, pitch, and dancing with Florence.
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